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2003-2004 CLA Catalog


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Willamette University

900 State Street
Salem, Oregon 97301

503-370-6300 voice

Course Listings

History

HIST 113 Topics in United States History: Early Period (1)

Development of American political institutions and the impact of major issues on American society and culture from the Revolutionary era through the Civil War.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Jopp, Cotlar

HIST 114 Topics in United States History: Later Period (1)

Development of the modern American state and the impact of major issues on American society and culture from Reconstruction to the present.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 115 (TH) Western Civilization to 1650 (1)

A survey of the cultural, intellectual, political and socioeconomic developments of Western society. It examines ancient Near Eastern, Greek and Roman societies, the rise of Christianity, the Medieval period, the Renaissance and Reformation and the Age of Absolutism. Among the fundamental aims of the course is to identify the defining characteristics of different phases of Western historical development and to study the factors that precipitate long- and short-term historical change. The course is very broad in scope and seeks to provide students with a sense of how Western ideas, social relations and institutions have changed over time and how these changes are interrelated. It also aims to acquaint students with different approaches to historical inquiry.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Duvall, Lucas, Smaldone

HIST 116 (TH) Western Civilization since 1650 (1)

A survey of the cultural, intellectual, political and socioeconomic developments of modern Western society, including the scientific revolution of the 17th Century, the Enlightenment, the age of democratic revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of nation-states, totalitarianism, two world wars, the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet system. Among the fundamental aims of the course is to identify the defining characteristics of different phases of Western historical development and to study the factors that precipitate long- and short-term historical change. The course is very broad in scope and seeks to provide students with a sense of how Western ideas, social relations and institutions have changed over time and how these changes are interrelated.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Duvall, Lucas, Smaldone

HIST 117 (TH) East Asian Civilization to 1800 (1)

An introduction to the rich histories of China and Japan from early prehistory to the eve of the arrival of the West in the early 19th century. Despite their geographic proximity, China and Japan followed different patterns of development during much of their history and this course will seek to examine those patterns, with an explicitly comparative approach, in the intellectual, socioeconomic and institutional realms. Readings emphasize literature and historical documents in translation.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 118 (TH) East Asian Civilization Since 1800 (1)

An introduction to the histories of China, Korea and Japan from the early 19th century to the present. This course will examine the experience of East Asian civilizations in their encounters with the West and the problems of modernization which followed. Despite their geographic proximity, China, Korea and Japan followed different patterns during much of their history and this course will seek to examine those patterns, with an explicitly comparative approach, in the intellectual, socioeconomic and institutional realms. Readings emphasize literature and historical documents in translation.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 120 (TH) An Introduction to the History of Science (1)

This course offers a general survey of scientific thought from the philosophies of ancient Greece to modern physics and molecular biology.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Jackson

HIST 122 Introduction to the History of Technology (1)

This course is an undergraduate survey dealing with the history of technology and its complex relationship to society from ancient Greece to the present. Topics include the Industrial Revolution, the history of the computer, optical technology, the role of technology during World Wars 1 & 2, and the role of nuclear arms technology.

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Jackson

HIST 131 (TH) Historical Inquiry (1)

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of historical inquiry. Through the exploration of a specifically defined topic, the course will examine primary documents, issues of change and continuity in time, theories of causation, historical interpretation and argument, and the importance of historical thinking for human experience in the world.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

Prerequisite: Freshmen and Sophomores only. May be repeated for credit one time if the topic is different.

  • Offering: Every Semester
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 233 (TH) History and Culture along the Silk Road

[Crosslisted with REL 233]

The goal of this course is to help students develop their understanding of a region of the world that has played an enormously important role in both world and Asian history. Stretching from China to the Mediterranean world, the Silk Road has for thousands of years been alive with dynamic interactions among various Asian cultural groups. It also has served as a vital link in the economic and cultural exchanges that occurred among the civilizations of Eastern Asia, Central Asia, the Middle East, and Western Europe. The course will specifically focus on the roles played by the natural environment, historical events, and individuals in the origins of and changes in Silk Road cultural forms.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Zhou

HIST 240 (TH) Introduction to the History of Western Medicine(1)

This course offers a survey of the development of Western medicine from the French Enlightenment to the present. Topics include gender and medicine, the social construction of disease, medicine and the state, and medicine and death.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically; Death Cluster

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Jackson

HIST 248 (W, TH) Drugs in World History (1)

This comparative history seminar will be an exploration of the various ways that psychoactive substances have influenced social and political life during the past four hundred years. We will cover a range of topics, including the medicinal and “recreational” roles of drugs in various non-Western societies; the trade in and consumption of habit-forming substances in the West; the eighteenth and nineteenth century international narcotics trade, along with its connections to the structures and processes of European imperialism and its historical implications for the countries of Asia and elsewhere; and the twentieth-century expansion of the global drug trade, particularly the rise of the Asian and Latin American narco-traffickers. The course will end with a look at the history of the US “war on drugs” and the implications of drug consumption and drug policy for American society.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-Centered

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate Springs
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 254 20th-Century Europe (1)

This course surveys the history of Europe in the 20th century. Focusing on social and political developments, it examines the phenomenon of nationalism, total war, the Russian Revolution, the Depression, the rise of fascism and bureaucratic collectivism, and the Holocaust. In the post-WWII period, the course will focus on the division of Europe and of Europe in the Cold War, the decline of the European empires and on the contradictory forces that are pushing Europe toward economic and political unity on the one hand (most markedly in the West) and toward dissolution and conflict (especially in the East).

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 256 Colonial Latin America (1)

A study of the history of Latin America from the pre-colonial period to independence. Emphasis will be placed on the development of Latin America's economy, culture and political life. Special attention will be given to the encounter between the Spanish conquistadors and indigenous peoples, as well as to the background of the movements for independence.

  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Jopp

HIST 258 Modern Latin America (1)

This course examines the significant social, political, economic and cultural developments in Latin America from the 19th century movements for independence through the 20th century. Special emphasis will be given to Mexico, Cuba, and Central America as well as selected South American states including Brazil. The role of the United States in the region will also receive much attention.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 262 American Women's History (1)

This class will present an overview of the history of women in the United States. The course will explore the shifting nature of gender systems, focusing on the following topics: the nature of women’s work, sexuality and reproduction, education, social reform and feminism. The course will emphasize the diversity of American women’s lives in terms of class, ethnic, racial and regional background.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 263 American Colonial History (1)

American colonial history in the 17th and 18th centuries; trans-Atlantic economic, cultural and intellectual ties; the development of distinctly American institutions in the colonial period, the movement toward rebellion and the nature of the revolutionary struggle.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Coltar

HIST 265 (TH) Late Imperial China (1)

This course examines the social and cultural history of China during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). Topics include the political structures of imperial rule; the social and cultural institutions that organized local society; the economic trends that produced the pre-modern world's largest and most advanced civilization; and the ways in which all of the above were transformed by China's 19th-century encounter with Western imperialism. This period provides an excellent case study of nationalism and modernization in a non-Western context.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 282 (TH) Twentieth-Century China: The Search for Modernity (1)

This course provides a broad survey of political history and social change in China from the fall of the imperial order to the “market socialism” of today. Topics include: state and society in late imperial China; the turmoil of civil war and Japanese invasion; the rise of Chairman Mao and the Chinese Communist Party; the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution disasters; the economics reform of Deng, Xiaoping; and the political crisis posed by student pro-democracy demonstrators in 1989.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 301 (W) Themes in American Social History (1)

A study of the major themes in American social history. The methods and central debates of this movement to study history "from the bottom up" will be analyzed. Topics include mobility, the work and residential patterns of African-Americans and immigrants and poverty.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 302 Foundations of American Thought (1)

A study of the changing climate of opinion and representative intellectuals from the colonial period to the 20th century. Emphasis will be placed on Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism and the development of Pragmatism.

  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 305 The United States During the Cold War (1)

An examination of social, political and economic development in America since the Second World War. Major themes include anticommunism, race and gender relations, urban development and presidential politics.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 306 History Through Biography (1)

The aim of this course is to study the life of a major historical figure. Through the use of biographical and autobiographical works, students will examine the subject’s life, the historical context in which the person lived, and his or her historical significance. In addition to these aims, the course will also survey a range of biographical approaches..

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 307 American Immigration History (1)

This course will explore the major themes and debates in American immigration history. Topics will include key migration waves, immigration policy, acculturation and attitudes towards immigrants, with an emphasis on the post-Civil War period. Methodological issues in researching immigrant history will also be explored.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 308 American Legal History (1)

A study of the history of American law from its origins in the colonial period to its contemporary condition. This course will use the law that we study as a window on the economic, political and social forces that mold law and examine the role of law in American society. The ultimate objective is to come to some conclusions about the relationship between ourselves and our legal system.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Jopp

HIST 309 History of American Radicalism (1)

This course surveys the history of egalitarian radicalism in America from the revolutionary era until the present. Topics to be covered include agrarian populism, feminism, the abolitionist movement, anarchism, labor activism and socialism, the civil rights movement, and the changing role of artists in radical movements. Students will engage with a wide range of primary and secondary sources which illuminate the different, intertwining strands of American radical thought, the historical moments when progressive ideas gained more or less widespread acceptance, the interaction between radical movements and state authority, the interplay between international politics and American activism, and the conflicts within and between American social movements.

Prerequisite: One American History class or permission of instructor

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 313 Greece and the Hellenistic World (.5)

The course will deal with Homeric Greece, early Sparta and Athens, the rise of tyrannies and their fall to democratic forces at the time of the Peloponnesian War. Further, the course will deal briefly with the cultural ascendancy of Athens as reflected in its philosophy and theater and the growing disillusionment in the decline of the 4th and 3rd centuries. Lastly, it will cover the diffusion of Greek culture in the East following the conquests of Alexander the Great.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Lucas

HIST 314 Ancient Rome (.5)

Primitive Italy and the founding of Rome; its expansion, the Punic Wars, social discontent and the Gracchi; the civil wars and the decline of the Republic; Julius Caesar and Octavian; the Julio-Claudian dynasty; the Flavians; philosophies of resignation, religions of hope.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Lucas

HIST 315 Early Middle Ages (.5)

The barbarian invasions, the decline of the Roman empire and the rise of Christianity and its new moral norms, institutions and hierarchies. The Frankish Empire and the threats of Byzantine, Moslem and Viking civilizations.

  • Offering: Alternate Years, Fall
  • Instructor: Lucas

HIST 316 High Middles Ages (.5)

Western Europe from the 11th through the 13th centuries, revival of economic and urban life, the Investiture Controversy, the 12th-century Renaissance, the crusades, the rise of the feudal monarchies, scholasticism, Gothic art and architecture, literature of the period and the secularization of Europe in the 13th century.

  • Offering: Alternate Years, Spring
  • Instructor: Lucas

HIST 317 The Renaissance (.5)

The breakdown of the medieval order, Great Schism, Black Death and the unique Italian microcosm. Machiavelli and other commentators on the age. The Renaissance papacy and its enemies; the rise of the centralized powers of France and Spain.

  • Offering: Alternate Years, Fall
  • Instructor: Lucas

HIST 318 The Reformation (.5)

Basically a course in 16th century Europe, recognizing religion as the central driving force of the period. Luther and German nationalism, the Tudors and English nationalism, international Calvinism, witchcraft, the Catholic response. Toleration and criticism of Erasmus, Montaigne and Rabelais.

  • Offering: Alternate Years, Spring
  • Instructor: Lucas

HIST 320 European Intellectual History: The Enlightenment (1)

Major trends in European thought during the 17th and 18th centuries, particularly the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and the rise of Romanticism. Not available to freshmen.

  • Offering: Every third semester
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 321 European Intellectual History: The 19th-Century (1)

Major trends in European thought from Hegel to Nietzsche and Freud, including Marxism, Liberalism and Positivism and its rejection. Not available to freshmen.

  • Offering: Every third semester
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 322 European Intellectual History: The 20th-Century (1)

Major trends in European thought from Nietzsche, Freud and Wittgenstein to the present, including phenomenology, relativism, existentialism and postmodern discourse. Not available to freshmen.

  • Offering: Every third semester
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 323 (W) Advanced Topics in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine (1)

This course offers an advanced-level seminar on the history of science, technology, and medicine from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Topics include: the politics of the French revolution, optical artisans, technology during the French Enlightenment, the history of venereal disease, and the concept of the gene.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-Centered

Prerequisite: One course in History.

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Jackson

HIST 361 African American History 1619-1865 (1)

This course examines the experience of African Americans in the United States from 1619 to the end of the Civil War. Course topics will include the Atlantic Slave Trade, the relationship between slavery and racism, the development of free black communities in the North and South, slave religion, patterns of slave resistance and accommodation, the emergence of a shared African-American culture in the 18th century, and the African-American role in both the abolitionist movement and the Civil War.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 362 African American History 1865-Present (1)

[Crosslisted with AES 362]

This course examines the experience of African Americans in the United States from Reconstruction to the present. Course topics will include Reconstruction, the Jim Crow period, the Great Migration, the urban experience, the Civil Rights Movement, and African American leadership.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 367 The American Revolution (1)

This course examines the causes and consequences of the American Revolution. Course materials explore the events of 1763 to 1789 from many different perspectives--as a set of diplomatic and military encounters which fractured a long-standing colonial relationship, as a pivotal moment in the history of Anglo-American political thought, as part of the expansion of a market-oriented economy in North America, and as a socially transformative event in the lives of the laboring men, women, African-Americans, and Native Americans who took part in the war. Students will engage with a wide range of primary and secondary sources which will enable them to assess in what ways the American War for Independence was or was not a revolutionary war.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 371 History of Modern England (1)

From the Stuarts, institutional, political, economic, social, religious and cultural aspects of the development of English life and British contributions to the modern world.

  • Offering: Alternate Years, Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 372 History of Modern Russia (1)

The uniqueness of Russian civilization, the Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union. The emancipation period, revolutionary thought and action, the constitutional monarchy, the 1917 revolutions and the establishment of the Soviet regime, the development of agriculture and industry and the evolution of the Communist Party.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 373 History of Modern France (1)

From the Revolution of 1789 to the present, considering the revolutionary tradition and its impact, and the difficulties of France culturally, socially and economically in making the adjustment to the 20th century.

  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 376 Latin American Revolutions (1)

[Crosslisted as POLI 376]

This course examines selected 20th-century Latin American revolutions. Historical and comparative approaches to the causes and outcomes of revolution are used.

Prerequisite: One of HIST 258, POLI 362 or 375 (may be taken concurrently). Not open to Freshman.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Dash

HIST 377 Modern Mexico (1)

[Crosslisted as POLI 377]

This course explores the history and politics of modern Mexico, from its war of independence to the present. The primary focus of the course is on major social, political and economic trends that have led to the transformation of state and society.

Prerequisite: One of HIST 256 or 258, or one of POLI 362 or 375 (may be taken concurrently)

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Dash

HIST 380 History of Traditional Japan (1)

A course on Japanese history from early time to approximately 1800. The primary focus will be on major political and social trends that led to the transformation of the state and society. Attention will also be given to religious belief, rituals, art and literature.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 381 (TH) History of Modern Japan (1)

This course examines the history of modern Japan from the late Tokugawa period (1800) through the Meiji Restoration (1868) and Japan's first industrial revolution, the rise of militarism and the road to Pearl Harbor, and Japan's remarkable growth and development in the postwar era. The emphasis will be on coming to terms with the nature and process of change in Japan's modern historical experience.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Loftus

HIST 383 Mao's China 1949-1979 (1)

Examination of the major events which took place during Mao's era, 1949-1976, and political and economic reforms during Deng Xiaoping's era. The issues will be focused on the structure of the CCP, its ideology, its left-oriented policies, its foreign policies and the power struggles within the leadership. Assessment of the role of Mao Zedong will provide a basis for understanding Chinese politics and society.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 384 History of Chinese Medicine (1)

This discussion seminar will explore the nearly three thousand year history of medicine in China. We will begin with an overview of the study of medicine generally and then move on to cover the basic foundations of Chinese medicine in ancient science and philosophy. The remaining classes will systematically introduce students to the most important periods of Chinese medical history, the major theories concerning health and disease, and the primary tools that Chinese physicians have used over time to combat illness. We will conclude the course with a consideration of traditional medicine as practiced in China and the West today.

Prerequisites: Previous course in History of Medicine/Asian Studies recommended.

  • Offering: Alternate Falls
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 389 (TH) Physics and society (1)

This course treats the history of physics from 1700 to the present. We shall investigate how sociocultural factors influence physics and, conversely, how physics has influenced culture and society.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Jackson

HIST 390 (W, 4th Sem Lang Req) Germany from Bismarck to Hitler (1)

This course surveys the making of modern Germany from the creation of the Hohenzollern Empire under Bismarck until the collapse of the Third Reich in 1945. It examines the key social, economic, cultural, and political developments that led to the Empire's collapse at the end of the First World War, the founding of the Weimar Republic, and the rise and fall of Nazism.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered; Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 391 (4th Sem Lang Req) Germany Since 1945 (1)

This course surveys the socioeconomic, political and cultural development of Germany since the collapse of the Third Reich. It examines the postwar division of the country into West and East Germany, the impact of the Cold War on two frontline states and the internal and external factors that led to the country's recent "reunification." In addition, the course aims to raise questions about the essential features of the "democratic-capitalist" West and the "totalitarian-socialist" East and the ways in which these factors shape contemporary German society.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 392 (TH) Biology and Society (1)

This course explores the relationship between the biological sciences and society from Enlightenment France until the present. Topics include: the role of gender in 18th century classifications of plants, Darwin’s theory of evolution and its political and religious implications, eugenics and the Human Genome Project.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically

Prerequisite: One semester Biology or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Jackson

HIST 440 (W; TH) History of Modern Socialism (1)

A study of the socialist responses to the industrialization of Europe and to the development of modern society. The study will begin with utopian socialists and then special emphasis will be given to Marxism. Consideration will also be given to the relationship of revisionist socialist, Leninist, Stalinist and Maoist thought to orthodox Marxism.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 442 (W) The Holocaust (1)

This course examines the Holocaust as a central issue in modern history. The origins of the Holocaust, the implementation of the Final Solution, resistance to the Nazis and the legacy of the Holocaust will be studied from the perspective of both German and Jewish history.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Eisenberg, Smaldone

HIST 444 (W) Seminar in Historiography and Philosophy of History (1)

Major trends, assumptions and problems in the writing of European and American history as related to the changing intellectual milieu from the Enlightenment to the present.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 445 Postwar Japan (1)

This course will examine Japan’s historical experience since the end of World War II. How did the Allied occupation shape the development of contemporary Japan? How has Japan evolved since the end of the occupation into a modern economic superpower? How is modern Japan governed and how do modern Japanese define themselves in terms of their own culture and in relation to the rest of the world? Using novels and films along with a variety of other readings, this course will explore these and other questions, which will help us understand how contemporary Japan sees itself and its relationship to the modern world.

Prerequisite: HIST 118, HIST 381 or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Instructor: Loftus

HIST 450 Advanced Topics in American History (1)

Special topics course to be offered when circumstances warrant, focusing on a particular problem, issue or theme in American history in accordance with faculty interest and expertise.

Prerequisite: Two courses in American history

  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 452 (W) Topics in Chinese/Japanese History (1)

A special topics course to be offered when circumstances warrant, focusing on a particular problem or issue in either Chinese or Japanese history in accordance with the faculty member's special interest and area of expertise.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: HIST 380 or 381 or consent of instructor. Closed to first-year students.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 453 (W) Social History Practicum: Local History (1)

This course aims to develop students' skills as social historians through development of research projects on Salem's history. Students will explore themes and issues in the practice of local history. They will learn to locate and use primary sources, frame historical questions, and place their findings within a broader historical context.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: One 300 level history course

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 491 Independent Study in American History (.5 or 1)

Directed reading and/or research in some aspect of American history for advanced students. Open only to juniors or seniors who have completed two credits in American history.

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 492 Readings in European History (1)

Intensive individual reading in the field of modern European history, offering interested students the opportunity to probe beyond the advanced survey level of HIST 320, 321 and 322.

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 499 (W) Senior Tutorial (1)

The History Senior Tutorial consists of a program of directed reading, research and writing in an area or topic of the student's own choice, in consultation with members of the department. As the tutorial is the culmination of the student's History major, it is expected that the tutorial topic will be from the student's area of concentration within the major and will build on course work completed by the student in that area. The tutorial project may be a research project involving the use of primary and secondary source materials, or a project that is a historiographical in nature.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: History major, senior standing

  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff