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Willamette University

900 State Street
Salem, Oregon 97301

503-370-6300 voice

Art and Art History View this department's website

The program in Art encompasses the closely related pursuits of creative studio art and art history. Both emphasize the rich diversity of human experience as it is expressed in visual form. The transmission of personal and cultural values through objects is a phenomenon that can be observed around us constantly in daily life; it is also something that happens over time, through space and across cultures. Indeed, our need to make, experience and comprehend art is as old and as profound as our need to speak. It is through art that we can understand ourselves and our potential and it is through art that we will be understood and remembered by those who will come after us.

The Department of Art and Art History offers two majors: one with a concentration in creative studio art and one with a concentration in art history. Both majors, as part of the broad liberal arts tradition, foster the development of analytical skills, engagement with ideas and the exploration of social and personal values. Consequently, students majoring in Art and Art History have found their study a good point of departure for careers in education, professional art, advertising, communications, architecture, art criticism and museum work, as well as law, business and government.

Through creative work, Studio Art courses develop skills that emphasize visual perception and articulation, conceptual and practical problems, and technical skills in a variety of media and processes. Foundation courses in basic design and composition prepare students for creative work in courses dealing with particular media or processes, such as painting, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, drawing, mixed media, electronic media, and photography.

The courses in Art History survey all periods from the Stone Age to the present in the Ancient Mediterranean region, Europe and North America, with limited offerings in contemporary art and in the art of China and Japan. Some of these courses range widely over a broad region and through a long period (Monuments and Themes of Western Art History, for instance), while others are more focused on a special art form or tradition (like Photography in America), a unique locale (as in Roman Art and Architecture, or Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art) or a single individual or monument (Michelangelo). In many of these courses, the University's art collections provide special opportunities both for class research projects and for individual study. Art History students are also strongly advised to study French or German as their foreign language. Further, they are encouraged to work in disciplines closely related to Art History (e.g., Classics, English and Comparative Literature, History, Religious Studies and Anthropology). Finally, Art History students are encouraged to take advantage of the many opportunities for travel and foreign study offered by Willamette programs in China, France, Greece, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, England and Spain.

The Art Building is located on the northwest corner of the campus at State and Winter Streets. Built in 1905 as a medical school and later used as the science building and then the College of Music, the building was completely renovated for use by the Department of Art and Art History in 1977, and remodeled with a 6,600 square foot addition in 2002-2003. The building includes studios for ceramics, drawing and design, painting, printmaking, photography, and digital imaging; an Art History seminar room and classroom; a student gallery; and faculty and administrative offices. The sculpture studio is located in a nearby building. The department is well equipped with a large slide collection, a growing digital image collection, and studio equipment needed to make works of art in a variety of media. The Germaine Fuller Japanese Garden adjacent to the building is another educational and aesthetic resource.

Integral to the program in Art and Art History is the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, one block from the Art Building. The museum enriches both the Art History and Studio Art programs, offering opportunities to study, firsthand, works of American, European, Asian and Native American art, to conduct research projects on particular objects or groups of objects in the University's growing collection and to study curatorial practices in anticipation of possible careers in museum work. Many Art History classes meet in the Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the museum.

The Department of Art and Art History offers two majors, one in Studio Art and one in Art History. While students may not double major in Studio Art and Art History, they may have a major in one and a minor in the other.

Requirements for the Studio Art Major (12 Credits)

One course from the following Foundation courses (to be completed in first semester of major) (1)

One course from the following Art History courses (1)

  • ARTH 215 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History I: Prehistoric to Gothic (1)
  • ARTH 216 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History II: 1300 - 1600 (1)
  • ARTH 217 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History III: 1600 - 1900 (1)

One course from the following Two Dimensional Media: Painting courses (1)

  • ARTS 235 Painting (1)
  • ARTS 236 Contemporary Painting Techniques and Concepts (1)

One course from the following Two Dimensional Media: Printmaking courses (1)

One course from the following Three Dimensional Media courses (1)

  • ARTS 210 (CA) Introduction to Sculpture (1)
  • ARTS 244 (CA) Topics in Sculpture (1)
  • ARTS 245 Introduction to Ceramics (1)

Additional Advanced Studio Art and Art History courses required

  • ARTH 357 Twentieth Century Art (1)
  • ARTS 241 Figure Drawing (1)
  • ARTS 381 Advanced Media and Design (1)
  • ARTS 440 (W) Writing for Artists (1)
  • ARTS 496 Senior Seminar (1)
  • Two additional credits in Studio Art above 100-level courses (2) (Both credits to be in either Two Dimensional Media or Three Dimensional Media)

Requirements for Studio Art Minor (5 Credits)

Requirements for Art History Major (10 Credits)

Core courses

  • ARTH 215 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History I: Prehistoric to Gothic (1)
  • ARTH 216 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History II: 1300 - 1600 (1)
  • ARTH 217 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History III: 1600 - 1900 (1)

One course from the following (1)

  • ARTH 212 (IT; TH) History of the Art of Asia (1)
  • ARTH 213 (IT; TH) History of the Art of China (1)
  • ARTH 214 (IT; TH) History of the Art of Japan (1)
  • ANTH 303 Museum Studies Seminar (1)
  • ANTH 341 Art, Culture and Power (1)
  • IDS 421 Studies in Florence (1)
  • PHIL 242 (AR) What is Art? (1)
  • PHIL 343 Philosophy and the Arts (1)
  • REL 237 (W) Introduction to Syro-Palestinian Archaeology (1)
  • REL 337 Archaeological Methodology (1)
  • RHET 125 (CA) Creating Visual Rhetoric (1)
  • RHET 361 Visual Rhetoric: Memory and Memorials (1)
  • WGS 258 (TH) Women in the Arts (1)

One course from the following (1)

Additional courses required

  • Three credits in upper level Art History courses (numbered above 250). (At least one of these courses must be in Ancient or Medieval Art History, and one must be in Renaissance, Modern, or American Art History.)
  • One elective credit in Art History or Studio Art (1)
  • ARTH 496 (W) Senior Seminar and Thesis (1)

Requirements for Art History Minor (5 Credits)

Faculty

  • Ann M. Nicgorski, Professor of Art History, Chair
  • Michael Boonstra, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art
  • Andries Fourie, Assistant Professor of Art
  • Kevin Greenwood, Instructor of Art History
  • Heidi Grew, Associate Professor of Art
  • Elizabeth Hudson, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art
  • Roger P. Hull, Professor of Art History
  • Alexandra Opie, Assistant Professor of Art
  • Guiseppe Scavizzi, Visiting Professor of Art History
  • James B. Thompson, Professor of Art

Course Listings

ARTH 212 (IT; TH) History of the Arts of Asia (1)

A selective survey of the visual arts of Asia, with an emphasis on major monuments and themes. The course includes broad developments in the arts of South Asia (India, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan), Southeast Asia (Myanamar, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia), Central Asia (Tibet, Mongolia), and East Asia (China, Korea and Japan) from prehistory of the present, with an emphasis on the influential artistic traditions of India, China and Japan. The arts in Asia will be examined and discussed from various perspectives in order to understand their significance in their cultural contexts.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 213 (IT; TH) History of the Art of China (1)

This course is the first in a two-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Asian art. History of the Art of China covers the period from approximately 6000 BCE to about 1800 CE. Special attention will be paid to how the art of China was created and viewed, how art functioned in relation to society and religion and how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Alternate Springs
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 214 (IT; TH) History of the Art of Japan (1)

This course is the second in a two-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Asian art. It covers the period from approximately 10,000 BCE to about 1900 CE in Japan. Special attention will be paid to how the art of Japan was created and viewed; how art functioned in relation to society and religion and how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Alternate Springs
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 215 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History I: Prehistoric to Gothic (1)

This course is the first part of a three-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Western art and architecture. It covers the period from approximately 25,000 BCE to about 1300 CE and explores the cultures of Prehistoric Europe, the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Etruria, Rome and Byzantium, as well as Early Christian and Medieval Europe. Special attention will be paid to how art was created and viewed; how art functioned in relation to society and religion; how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter; how power is invested in painting, sculpture and architecture; and how these important monuments affect us today.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 216 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History II: 1300-1600 (1)

This course is the second part of a three-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Western art and architecture. It explores the cultures of late Gothic and Renaissance Europe, with an emphasis on contrasts between Italian and Northern European art of this period. Special attention will be paid to how art was created and viewed; how art functioned in relation to society and religion; how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter; how power is invested in painting, sculpture and architecture; and how these important monuments affect us today.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 217 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History III: 1600-1900 (1)

This course is the third of a three-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Western art and architecture. It explores the cultures of Western Europe from the Baroque period to the twentieth century with some attention paid to American developments of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Course emphasis is on painting. Discussion focuses on how the art of the period 1600-1900 was created and viewed; how it functioned in relation to society, politics and (though less persistently than before) religion; how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter; how power is invested in painting; and how these important monuments affect us today.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Spring
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 251 Leonardo da Vinci (1)

This course will cover all major areas of Leonardo's interests and activity from the time of his apprenticeship in Verrocchio's workshop to his last years in France, focusing on the way the artist infused traditional iconography with new ideas and philosophical concepts, creating a style which later flourished in the work of such artists as Raphael and Michelangelo. It will also explore issues of methodology concerning the relationship between Leonardo's personality and his creativity.

  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Professor: Scavizzi

ARTH 252 Michelangelo (1)

This course is an introduction to the work of Michelangelo, one of the major artists of the 16th century. The activity of the artist will be surveyed from his beginnings in Ghirlandaio's workshop in Florence to the late frescoes of the Pauline Chapel in the Vatican. Special attention will be given to his most important cycles, namely the frescoes of the Sistine Chapel and the sculptures of the Medici Tombs. Although the focus of the course will be on the paintings, sculptures, and drawings by the artist, other areas of creativity such as architecture, poetry, and aesthetics will be touched upon. The course will also provide students with an understanding of major historical movements, like the artistic world of the High Renaissance and the spirituality of the Catholic Reformation.

  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Professor: Scavizzi

ARTH 257 (TH) Architecture in America (1)

This course presents a history of the development of American architecture from Colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on architectural styles and the relationship of style of historical periods and cultural assumptions. Focus is on the interplay of European architectural history with New World developments and transformations. The second half of the course heavily emphasizes late 19th and 20th century developments in Chicago, one of this nation's great architectural centers.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 258 Photography in America (.5)

The history of photography as a documentary and artistic medium in the U.S. Emphasis on the role and place of photography in American culture. (Not a technical study of photography.)

  • Offering: Periodically, second-half semester
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 259 (W; TH) Western Medieval Art and Architecture (1)

This writing-centered course explores the development of the mostly Christian art and architecture of Western Europe during the Medieval period from its beginnings in the last Roman Empire to its most grandiose expression in the great Gothic cathedrals. Emphasis will be placed on the social and political context of this artistic development, and important related issues, such as the role of women, patronage, and the development of the monastery and the university, will be discussed. Special topics that will be covered include Early Christian and Hiberno-Saxon manuscript illumination, the Bayeux Tapestry, the pilgrimage church of St. Pierre at Moissac, and the sculptural program of Chartres Cathedral.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 265 (TH) Baroque Art and Architecture in Europe (1)

This course offers to the general student a comprehensive picture of the most important artistic trends and personalities in Europe during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio, Rubens, Velazquez, Rembrandt, Vermeer, J.H. Mansard and Watteau are among the great Baroque and Rococo artists and architects who will be introduced in this course. Special topics that will also be explored include the new art and architecture created by the Catholic Church in Rome at the time of the Counter Reformation, the development of Realism in Italy and the new secular art in Holland, the completion of the Louvre and Versailles palaces in France and the beginning of the Rococo style.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 270 (TH; 4th Sem Lang Req) Roman Art and Architecture (1)

This course offers a comprehensive study of Roman civilization through its artistic and architectural monuments beginning with its roots in the Etruscan and Greek past, through the varied stylistic idioms of the Empire, to its gradual transformation in the Constantinian era, the prelude to the new Christian civilization of Byzantium. Topics include the Villa of the Mysteries, the Ara Pacis Augustae, the column of Trajan, Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli and the Arch of Constantine. A special emphasis will also be placed on art historical methodology (i.e., which questions are posed, what evidence is cited and how meaning is construed) and on exploring issues of gender and private patronage as well as imperial propaganda and social policy.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 271 (IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Greek Art and Architecture (1)

This course explores the development of historical Greek sculpture, painting, and architecture from its beginnings (ca 1200 B.C.E.) to the end of the Hellenistic period (31 B.C.E.). Central themes include the Greek interest in mythological narrative, and the pursuit of idealism, naturalism, and ultimately, the expression of raw emotion. The classic expressions of Greek architecture, in their stylistic unity and variety, will also be studied, especially the way buildings serve different functions with a very limited architectural language. The course will address the role of archaeology in providing these artifacts with physical contexts and chronologies that enhance our knowledge of the material and our understanding of ancient Greek culture. Ancient literary sources will also be examined in order to place this material in its full religious, social, and political context.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 335 Major Artists/Monuments (.5 or 1)

This course explores the works of a major artist (or artistic group) or a major art-historical monument in the context of the appropriate period and milieu. Artists and monuments that are studied will vary with the interests of students and faculty.

Prerequisite: ARTH 215, 216 or 217 or consent of instructor.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 344 (W) American Art and Culture (1)

This museum-centered course explores the development of art and its changing significance in American culture from colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. Emphasis is on painting and prints (and to a lesser extent sculpture) as these developed from English colonial roots. Course themes include the effect of artistic domination of England and Europe on the colonial arts, the development of an "American approach" to creating and appreciating art and the de-emphasis but gradual acceptance of the arts as a means to "define" America, to romanticize (or criticize) its expansion, to celebrate its past, or to offer an introspective alternative to public, patriotic reality.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 345 Special Topics in Art History (1)

Specialized study in an area of art history not normally available as part of the curriculum. Possible topics that might be offered include Illuminated Manuscripts, Women in Art, and Contemporary Art. Consult the class schedule for the current topic. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 355 Italian Renaissance Art (1)

Painting, sculpture and architecture of the Italian Renaissance, with emphasis on 15th-century Florence.

Prerequisite: ARTH 216 recommended

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 356 Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art (1)

Painting and sculpture of the 15th through the 17th centuries primarily in Flanders, France, Germany, Spain and Holland.

Prerequisite: ARTH 216 recommended

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 357 Twentieth Century Art (1)

Painting and sculpture of the 20th century in Europe and America. Emphasis on the nature of modernism and the role of the avant garde in Europe. American developments after 1940.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 372-373 Independent Study in Art History I and II (.5 or 1)

Reading and conference for advanced students in art history.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 496 (W) Senior Seminar and Thesis (1)

Required for senior Art majors. Group seminars as well as advanced independent work with an individual major professor. Includes preparation of a senior project. This is offered as a single, year-long course. The credit is divided 0.5 in the Fall and 0.5 in the Spring. You must register for it each semester.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: Courses leading to the status of senior Art major.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Staff

ARTS 112 (CA) Color and Composition (1)

Studio demonstrations are given concerning the processes used to produce two-dimensional images which utilize color as the primary visual medium. A series of studio problems is used to provide direct experience with the instruments and materials employed to produce color surfaces.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 113 (CA) Fundamentals of Design (1)

Lectures and creative work in the theoretical and practical use of basic principles underlying the structure of the visual arts through studio practice in handling the elements of color, volume, space, line and texture in various media.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 114 (CA) Three-Dimensional Design (1)

This course introduces the fundamental sculptural principles of space, line, shape, mass, texture, unity, balance, emphasis and scale. The processes of linear, planar, modular and plastic construction will be undertaken. Emphasis will be on students discussing and understanding the principles of three-dimensional design as well as executing studio projects characterized by quality craft and successful composition.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Fourie

ARTS 116 (CA) Ways of Drawing (1)

Studio demonstrations are given concerning the processes used to produce drawings on two-dimensional surfaces. A series of studio problems is used to provide direct experience with the instruments and materials employed to produce drawing surfaces. Demonstrations and lectures.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Triennially in fall
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 117 (CA) Exploring Visual Art (1)

Students will create works of art utilizing a variety of techniques. They will begin with two-dimensional media such as drawing, painting, and/or collage, and progress to three-dimensional media including clay and other materials. Independent research, visits to the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, and occasional lectures by guest artists or art historians outside of class required.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 131 Etching I (1)

Studio demonstrations are given in the use of tools and materials that are required to produce etchings. Black and white printing techniques are introduced with an emphasis on drawing systems and design. Open to beginning printmakers.

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 210 (CA) Introduction to Sculpture (1)

This course will introduce students to the fundamental sculptural processes of addition, subtraction and substitution. Emphasis will be on students executing, understanding and discussing quality craft, successful composition, productive conceptualization and creative problem solving. Students will explore various sculptural methods including steel fabrication, wood construction, plaster construction, assemblage and mold-making.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Fourie

ARTS 211 Digital Media (1)

This class surveys and exposes the basic concepts of two dimensional image making in the electronic realm. A central theme of the course is the use of computer technology to generate visual points of view and to express precise thoughts through image and text. Students will be instructed in the basic operation of software programs and encouraged to go beyond the traditional applications of each software package.

Prerequisites: ARTS 112, 113, 116, 117, or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 216 Video Art I (1)

This class explores the communicative and expressive potentials of single camera digital video production and editing. Students will gain a basic theoretical understanding of video as an art form and its relationship to film as an image making apparatus. Technical aspects of the course include lighting, sound, digital editing and the organization and planning involved in a video project.

Prerequisite: ARTS 112, 113, 114, 116, 117, or consent of instructor.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 231 Etching II (1)

Studio demonstrations are given in the use of tools and materials needed to produce etchings. Color printing techniques are introduced with an emphasis on modern and contemporary techniques.

Prerequisite: ARTS 131 or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 232 Black and White Photography I (1)

Technical and visual aspects of shooting and developing black and white film will be pursued. Darkroom printing will address technique and composition. Periodic student presentations and critiques of work will occur.

Prerequisite: ARTS 112, 113, 114, 116117 or consent of instructor. A 35mm SLR camera with a 50mm lens is required.

  • Offering: Every Semester
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 233 Black and White Photography II (1)

Technical and visual aspects of shooting, developing and printing black and white film will continue to be pursued. Emphasis will be on experimentation with altered images that may occur in both shooting and printing. Infrared and Technical Pan films will be explored. Experimentation with printing techniques will be with contact, photograms, altered images by collage, drawing on negatives, sandwiching negatives and toning.

Prerequisite: ARTS 232 and/or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 235 Painting (1)

A series of studio problems using systems of design, composition and techniques that study past and modern problems in painting. Demonstrations are presented to show the integration of past drawing systems in the making of paintings. Open to beginning students.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 236 Contemporary Painting Techniques and Concepts (1)

A series of studio problems using systems of design, composition and techniques that study current problems in contemporary painting. Open to beginning students.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 241 Figure Drawing (1)

Lectures and creative work in drawing from the human figure for beginning students. Various media: charcoal, ink, pastel, oil.

Prerequisite: ARTS 100 level course or ARTS 240 recommended

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 242 Woodcuts and Collagraphs (1)

A series of studio problems introducing students to the materials and tools needed to produce woodcuts and collagraphs printed in both black and white and color. Demonstrations, assignments and lectures stress the relief nature of the printing surfaces. Offered to beginning and advanced-level printmakers.

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 243 Monoprinting (1)

A series of studio problems introducing students to the materials and tools needed to produce monoprints. Monoprints are images that are not reproduced in an edition and thus are unique prints. Demonstrations are given in black and white and color printing. Stress is placed on integrating drawing and painting ideas in the prints. Offered to beginning and advanced-level printmakers.

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 244 (CA) Topics in Sculpture (1)

This course allows students to conduct an in depth, focused exploration of topics, genres and modes of expression not covered by the regular sculpture curriculum, and could address such areas as: sculptural installation, site specific sculpture, the sculpture of the body/figure, multi-media sculpture, environmental sculpture, sculpture and the preformative aspect, and the found object in sculpture. The class will focus on one assigned topic, and the topic will vary from semester to semester. An experimental, innovative approach to the topic will be encouraged. May be repeated for credit if the topics varies.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Fourie

ARTS 245 Introduction to Ceramics (1)

The use of various clays will be explored in two-dimensional and three-dimensional design. Handbuilding, wheel work, glaze application and firing techniques will be pursued.

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 311 Web Art and New Media (1)

This course investigates the conceptual and technical potential of electronic media and how it might extend other areas of art making. Topics covered include how the machine might extend what the artist and historian already know and do, the strengths of the machine and how they may be applied to enhance the individual's approaches, and how an idea transcends technique. Projects/exercises are designed to aid in answering such questions by exploring various techniques and concepts pertinent to new technologies and the computer as an image driving tool. Image manipulation, the computer and time based issues, internet art and web publishing, as well as the necessary software needed for these investigations, will be presented.

Prerequisite: ARTS 211

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 316 (CA) Video Art II (1)

Video Art II focuses on the use of video as an artistic medium. Students are encouraged to work experimentally and are expected to achieve a level of technical competence and confidence necessary to undertake ambitious creative work. Technical demonstrations expand students' knowledge of image/sound manipulations, capture, and editing techniques. The class views and discusses key contemporary works and related critical writings.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 216

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 340 Concepts of Sculpture (1)

This course focuses on the relationship between idea, form and material. Students will be required to produce a series of sculptures that explore one specific idea, concept, personal or social issue of their choice. Metaphor and symbolism will be examined and used as a vehicle for communicating meaning. Emphasis will be placed on the unity of the body of work being produced as well as on clarity, craftsmanship and presentation. Students will also be expected to analyze critically the use of conceptual content in contemporary sculpture.

Prerequisite: ARTS 114 or ARTS 210

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Fourie

ARTS 341 Material Exploration in Sculpture (1)

This course requires students to pick a specific sculptural material and to examine thoroughly its inherent meaning, physical properties, qualities and characteristics for three-dimensional expression. The structure of the course will allow the student to produce a unified body of work that reflects his/her specific interest. Emphasis will be on experimentation, the development of technical skill, and creative problem solving. The course will also involve a critical analysis on the use of materials by prominent contemporary sculptors.

Prerequisite: ARTS 114 or ARTS 210

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Fourie

ARTS 346 (CA) Ceramic Vessel Construction (1)

This studio course will devote equal time to handbuilding and wheel throwing as methods of vessel construction. The course will focus on form, design, function, and craftsmanship.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 245

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 347 (CA) Ceramic Sculpture (1)

This course introduces students to sculptural ideas executed in various hand construction techniques including slab, coil, press mold, etc. Students will explore how the unique physical characteristics of clay can contribute to the content of the work. Emphasis will be on process, exploration, and discussion.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 245

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 349 (CA) Ceramic Surface Techniques (1)

This course provides a variety of approaches to surface techniques including relief, drawing, printing, slip painting, texturing, and advanced glaze application. The course is open to students interested in vessels or sculpture.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 245

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 360-377 Independent Projects (1)

For advanced art students. Individual study and work in areas of the Art major's special interest. Printmaking (360 and 361), Painting (362 and 363), Drawing (364 and 365), Ceramics (366 and 367), Sculpture (368 and 369), Design (370 and 371), Jewelry (372 and 373), Photography (374 and 375), and Electronic Media (376 and 377).

  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 381 Advanced Media and Design (1)

Advanced studio work to permit the student to achieve a high level of competence in a selected area of interest. The student is expected, in consultation with the instructor, to identify and solve specific problems which will develop in depth an understanding and appreciation of the tools, materials and ideas used.

Prerequisite: Art Studio majors with junior standing, or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 440 (W) Writing for Artists (1)

This writing-centered course explores the variety of ways that artists need to communicate verbally for success as a developing professional. Topics will include writing an artist statement, reviews of work, grant and project proposals, research and discussion of issues directly relating to artists, and personal reflection upon the creative process. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues in the arts. Special topics will develop from guest artists and professionals in art administration, museums, galleries, and non-profit organizations.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: Senior Art Studio Majors only.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Grew, Fourie, Opie

ARTS 496 (CA) Senior Seminar (0.5 Fall; 0.5 Spring)

The Senior Seminar is the culminating experience in the Studio Art major program. The seminar is devoted to all aspects of conceptualizing and preparing a major work or series of work for final exhibition in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Students work on their senior projects independently throughout fall and spring semesters with supervision of one or more studio faculty advisor. Special guest lecturers and topics also presented. This is offered as a single, year-long course. The credit is divided 0.5 in the Fall and 0.5 in the Spring. You must register for it each semester.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: Senior Art Majors only

  • Offering: Fall/Spring
  • Instructor: Grew, Fourie, Thompson, Opie