Support WU
A-Z Index

2008-2009 CLA Catalog


Quick Links

Jump to a Discipline

Jump to a Specific Course

Willamette University

900 State Street
Salem, Oregon 97301

503-370-6300 voice

Course Listings

Art and Art History: Art History

ARTH 212 (IT; TH) History of the Arts of Asia (1)

A selective survey of the visual arts of Asia, with an emphasis on major monuments and themes. The course includes broad developments in the arts of South Asia (India, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan), Southeast Asia (Myanamar, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia), Central Asia (Tibet, Mongolia), and East Asia (China, Korea and Japan) from prehistory of the present, with an emphasis on the influential artistic traditions of India, China and Japan. The arts in Asia will be examined and discussed from various perspectives in order to understand their significance in their cultural contexts.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 213 (IT; TH) History of the Art of China (1)

This course is the first in a two-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Asian art. History of the Art of China covers the period from approximately 6000 BCE to about 1800 CE. Special attention will be paid to how the art of China was created and viewed, how art functioned in relation to society and religion and how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Alternate Springs
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 214 (IT; TH) History of the Art of Japan (1)

This course is the second in a two-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Asian art. It covers the period from approximately 10,000 BCE to about 1900 CE in Japan. Special attention will be paid to how the art of Japan was created and viewed; how art functioned in relation to society and religion and how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster

  • Offering: Alternate Springs
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 215 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History I: Prehistoric to Gothic (1)

This course is the first part of a three-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Western art and architecture. It covers the period from approximately 25,000 BCE to about 1300 CE and explores the cultures of Prehistoric Europe, the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Etruria, Rome and Byzantium, as well as Early Christian and Medieval Europe. Special attention will be paid to how art was created and viewed; how art functioned in relation to society and religion; how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter; how power is invested in painting, sculpture and architecture; and how these important monuments affect us today.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 216 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History II: 1300-1600 (1)

This course is the second part of a three-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Western art and architecture. It explores the cultures of late Gothic and Renaissance Europe, with an emphasis on contrasts between Italian and Northern European art of this period. Special attention will be paid to how art was created and viewed; how art functioned in relation to society and religion; how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter; how power is invested in painting, sculpture and architecture; and how these important monuments affect us today.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 217 (IT; TH) Monuments and Themes of Western Art History III: 1600-1900 (1)

This course is the third of a three-semester study intended to introduce the major monuments and themes of Western art and architecture. It explores the cultures of Western Europe from the Baroque period to the twentieth century with some attention paid to American developments of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Course emphasis is on painting. Discussion focuses on how the art of the period 1600-1900 was created and viewed; how it functioned in relation to society, politics and (though less persistently than before) religion; how meaning is inherent in both style and subject matter; how power is invested in painting; and how these important monuments affect us today.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts; Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Spring
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 251 Leonardo da Vinci (1)

This course will cover all major areas of Leonardo's interests and activity from the time of his apprenticeship in Verrocchio's workshop to his last years in France, focusing on the way the artist infused traditional iconography with new ideas and philosophical concepts, creating a style which later flourished in the work of such artists as Raphael and Michelangelo. It will also explore issues of methodology concerning the relationship between Leonardo's personality and his creativity.

  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 252 Michelangelo (1)

This course is an introduction to the work of Michelangelo, one of the major artists of the 16th century. The activity of the artist will be surveyed from his beginnings in Ghirlandaio's workshop in Florence to the late frescoes of the Pauline Chapel in the Vatican. Special attention will be given to his most important cycles, namely the frescoes of the Sistine Chapel and the sculptures of the Medici Tombs. Although the focus of the course will be on the paintings, sculptures, and drawings by the artist, other areas of creativity such as architecture, poetry, and aesthetics will be touched upon. The course will also provide students with an understanding of major historical movements, like the artistic world of the High Renaissance and the spirituality of the Catholic Reformation.

  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 257 (TH) Architecture in America (1)

This course presents a history of the development of American architecture from Colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on architectural styles and the relationship of style of historical periods and cultural assumptions. Focus is on the interplay of European architectural history with New World developments and transformations. The second half of the course heavily emphasizes late 19th and 20th century developments in Chicago, one of this nation's great architectural centers.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 259 (TH) Western Medieval Art and Architecture (1)

This writing-centered course explores the development of the mostly Christian art and architecture of Western Europe during the Medieval period from its beginnings in the last Roman Empire to its most grandiose expression in the great Gothic cathedrals. Emphasis will be placed on the social and political context of this artistic development, and important related issues, such as the role of women, patronage, and the development of the monastery and the university, will be discussed. Special topics that will be covered include Early Christian and Hiberno-Saxon manuscript illumination, the Bayeux Tapestry, the pilgrimage church of St. Pierre at Moissac, and the sculptural program of Chartres Cathedral.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 263 (TH) Baroque and Neoclassical Visual Culture (1)

This course will explore the development of visual arts, architecture, and the increasing circulation of different kinds of images in Europe, as well as in other continents, from the beginning of the seventeenth century until the late eighteenth century. Particular attention will be dedicated to the analysis of specific artistic phenomena (for instance, the influential diffusion of Caravaggio's style in Europe, the appearance of new religious iconographies in the colonial areas, and the growing activity of European artists in other geographic regions, such as China and Japan). The course will also investigate the emergence of a new concept of art in the second half of the eighteenth century in relation to the poetics of Neoclassicism and the debates inaugurated by the theories of the Picturesque and the sublime.

Prerequisites: A 100 level art history course recommended.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 267 (TH) Renaissance Visual Culture (1)

This course will cover important topics related to the production, reception and circulation of artworks, as well as other typologies of images, from the fourteenth century to the beginning of the seventeenth century, in the attempt to analyze significant problems connected to the making of Renaissance visual culture. By following recent methodological approaches such as Postcolonial criticism, Semiotics, and Gender Studies, this course will intentionally extend the geographic boundaries usually adopted by Renaissance scholars in order to explore the world of art and the increasing process of visual dissemination on a more global scale. The objects of the historical investigations, therefore, will not be exclusively centered in the forms of art produced in Europe, but also centered in the visual culture present in different colonial areas.

Prerequisite: A 100-level art history course recommended

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 270 (TH; 4th Sem Lang Req) Roman Art and Architecture (1)

This course offers a comprehensive study of Roman civilization through its artistic and architectural monuments beginning with its roots in the Etruscan and Greek past, through the varied stylistic idioms of the Empire, to its gradual transformation in the Constantinian era, the prelude to the new Christian civilization of Byzantium. Topics include the Villa of the Mysteries, the Ara Pacis Augustae, the column of Trajan, Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli and the Arch of Constantine. A special emphasis will also be placed on art historical methodology (i.e., which questions are posed, what evidence is cited and how meaning is construed) and on exploring issues of gender and private patronage as well as imperial propaganda and social policy.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 271 (IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Greek Art and Architecture (1)

This course explores the development of historical Greek sculpture, painting, and architecture from its beginnings (ca 1200 B.C.E.) to the end of the Hellenistic period (31 B.C.E.). Central themes include the Greek interest in mythological narrative, and the pursuit of idealism, naturalism, and ultimately, the expression of raw emotion. The classic expressions of Greek architecture, in their stylistic unity and variety, will also be studied, especially the way buildings serve different functions with a very limited architectural language. The course will address the role of archaeology in providing these artifacts with physical contexts and chronologies that enhance our knowledge of the material and our understanding of ancient Greek culture. Ancient literary sources will also be examined in order to place this material in its full religious, social, and political context.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 335 Major Artists/Monuments (.5 or 1)

This course explores the works of a major artist (or artistic group) or a major art-historical monument in the context of the appropriate period and milieu. Artists and monuments that are studied will vary with the interests of students and faculty.

Prerequisite: ARTH 215, 216 or 217 or consent of instructor.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 344 (W) American Art and Culture (1)

This museum-centered course explores the development of art and its changing significance in American culture from colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. Emphasis is on painting and prints (and to a lesser extent sculpture) as these developed from English colonial roots. Course themes include the effect of artistic domination of England and Europe on the colonial arts, the development of an "American approach" to creating and appreciating art and the de-emphasis but gradual acceptance of the arts as a means to "define" America, to romanticize (or criticize) its expansion, to celebrate its past, or to offer an introspective alternative to public, patriotic reality.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 345 Special Topics in Art History (1)

Specialized study in an area of art history not normally available as part of the curriculum. Possible topics that might be offered include Illuminated Manuscripts, Women in Art, and Contemporary Art. Consult the class schedule for the current topic. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 351 (W) Christian Iconography (1)

This writing-centered seminar presents a global overview of the development of Christian iconographic themes in artworks from the Early Christian period up to the present day. Diverse media including painting, sculpture, installation work, etc., will be considered in the study of selected themes such as the Nativity, the Crucifixion, and St. Nicholas. Includes classic readings by the foremost scholar of iconographic studies (e.g., Andre' Grabar, Emile Male, Erwin Panofksy, Gertrude Schiller, Kurt Weitzman, Aby Warburg) and readings in primary texts (e.g., the New Testament and the Christian apocrypha). Emphasis on writing (including a final research paper) as well as discussion and presentation skills.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-Centered

Prerequisite: A 100 or 200 level art history course recommended

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 357 Twentieth Century Art (1)

Painting and sculpture of the 20th century in Europe and America. Emphasis on the nature of modernism and the role of the avant garde in Europe. American developments after 1940.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 362 (W) Theories and Methodologies of Art History (1)

This course seeks to provide an overview of the history of art history. Its main subject will be art history as a specific field of research in the attempt to understand its epistemological boundaries as well as its ramified network of connections with other disciplines, such as Literary Criticism, Anthropology, Semiotics, Social History, Philosophy, Gender Studies, and Film Studies. The course will thereby survey the various methodological approaches to art history in an interdisciplinary way, starting with a close examination of traditional art historical tools and concepts of analysis: style, form, iconography. It will explore art history as a literary genre since the sixteenth century and as an academic discipline from the nineteenth century until the so-called "linguistic turn" in the 1960s. Particular focus will also be dedicated to theoretical questions that arise in the interpretation of contemporary art and culture. Case studies will provide a set of concrete examples of practical applications of each method, in order to introduce specialized terminologies and to explore critical ways of thinking.

Prerequisite: A 200-level art history course

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-Centered

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Professor: de Mambro Santos

ARTH 372-373 Independent Study in Art History I and II (.5 or 1)

Reading and conference for advanced students in art history.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 496 (W) Senior Seminar and Thesis (1)

Required for senior Art majors. Group seminars as well as advanced independent work with an individual major professor. Includes preparation of a senior project. This is offered as a single, year-long course. The credit is divided 0.5 in the Fall and 0.5 in the Spring. You must register for it each semester.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: Courses leading to the status of senior Art major.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Staff