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Willamette University

900 State Street
Salem, Oregon 97301

503-370-6300 voice

Art and Art History View this department's website

The program encompasses the closely related pursuits of creative studio art and art history. Both emphasize the rich diversity of human experience as it is expressed in visual form. The transmission of personal and cultural values through objects is a phenomenon that can be observed around us constantly in daily life; it is also something that happens over time, through space, and across cultures. Indeed, our need to make, experience, and comprehend art is as old and as profound as our need to speak. It is through art that we can understand ourselves and our potential, and it is through art that we will be understood and remembered by those who will come after us.

The Department of Art and Art History offers two majors: one with a concentration in creative studio art and one with a concentration in art history. Both majors, as part of the broad liberal arts tradition, foster the development of analytical skills, engagement with ideas, and the exploration of social and personal values. Consequently, students majoring in Art and Art History have found their study a good point of departure for careers in education, professional art, advertising, communications, architecture, art criticism, and museum work, as well as law, business and government.

Through creative work, Studio Art courses develop skills that emphasize visual perception and articulation, conceptual and practical problems, and technical skills in a variety of media and processes. Foundation courses in basic design and composition prepare students for creative work in courses dealing with particular media or processes, such as painting, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, drawing, mixed media, electronic media, and photography. Upper level courses develop students' conceptual and artistic skills needed for successful completion of a final thesis project highlighted in the annual Senior Show at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art.

The courses in Art History survey all periods from the Stone Age to the present in the Ancient Mediterranean region, Europe, and North America, with limited offerings in contemporary art and in the art of China and Japan. Some of these courses range widely over a broad region and through a long period (Monuments and Themes of Western Art History, for instance), while others are more focused on a special art form or tradition, a unique locale, or a single individual or monument. In many of these courses, the University's art collections provide special opportunities both for class research projects and for individual study. Art History students are also strongly advised to study French or German as their foreign language. Further, they are encouraged to work in disciplines closely related to Art History (e.g., Classics, English and Comparative Literature, History, Religious Studies, and Anthropology). Finally, Art History students are encouraged to take advantage of the many opportunities for travel and foreign study offered by Willamette programs in China, France, Greece, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, England, and Spain.

The Art Building is located on the northwest corner of the campus at State and Winter Streets. Built in 1905 as a medical school and later used as the science building and then the College of Music, the building was completely renovated for use by the Department of Art and Art History in 1977, and remodeled with a 6,600 square foot addition in 2002-2003. The building includes studios for ceramics, drawing and design, painting, printmaking, photography, and digital imaging; an Art History seminar room and classroom; a student gallery; and faculty and administrative offices. The department is well equipped with a large slide collection, a growing digital image collection, and studio equipment needed to make works of art in a variety of media. The Germaine Fuller Japanese Garden adjacent to the building is another educational and aesthetic resource.

Integral to the program in Art and Art History is the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, one block from the Art Building. The museum enriches both the Art History and Studio Art programs, offering opportunities to study, firsthand, works of American, European, Asian, and Native American art, to conduct research projects on particular objects or groups of objects in the University's growing collection, and to study curatorial practices in anticipation of possible careers in museum work. Many Art History classes meet in the Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the museum.

Beginning in 2009, classes in digital and installation art are offered in Ford Hall, the new state-of-the-art classroom and studio building on campus. Ford Hall is adjacent to historic Gatke Hall, which houses an updated sculpture studio on the lower level. These facilities together with the Art Building itself and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art provide a variety of spaces and settings for the study of Art and Art History.

While students may not double major in Studio Art and Art History, they may have a major in one and a minor in the other.

Requirements for the Studio Art Major (12 Credits)

One course from the following Foundation courses (to be completed in first semester of major) (1)

  • ARTS 112 (CA) Color and Composition (1)
  • ARTS 113 (CA) Fundamentals of Design (1)
  • ARTS 114 (CA) Three-Dimensional Design (1)
  • ARTS 116 (CA) Ways of Drawing (1)
  • ARTS 117 (CA) Exploring Visual Art (1)
  • ARTS 121 (CA) New Media Art Fundamentals (1)

One course from the following Art History courses (1)

  • ARTH 115 (IT) Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art History (1)
  • ARTH 116 (IT) Introduction to Renaissance and Early Modern Art History (1)
  • ARTH 117 (IT) Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art History (1)

One course from the following Two Dimensional Media: Painting courses (1)

  • ARTS 235 Painting (1)
  • ARTS 236 Contemporary Painting Techniques and Concepts (1)

One course from the following Two Dimensional Media: Printmaking courses (1)

One course from the following Three Dimensional Media courses (1)

  • ARTS 210 (CA) Introduction to Sculpture (1)
  • ARTS 244 (CA) Topics in Sculpture (1)
  • ARTS 245 Introduction to Ceramics (1)

Additional Advanced Studio Art and Art History courses required

  • ARTH 357 Twentieth Century Art (1)
  • ARTS 241 Figure Drawing (1)
  • ARTS 381 Advanced Media and Design (1)
  • ARTS 440 (W) Writing for Artists (1)
  • ARTS 496 Senior Seminar (1)
  • Two additional credits in Studio Art above 100-level courses (2) (Both credits to be in either Two Dimensional Media or Three Dimensional Media)

Requirements for Studio Art Minor (5 Credits)

  • 1 credit in an introductory Studio Art course (ARTS 112, 113, 114, 116, 117,or 121)
  • 3 credits in Studio Art at the 200 or 300 level
  • 1 credit in introductory Art History

Requirements for Art History Major
(11 Credits: 10 credits in Art History, 1 credit in Studio Art)

Core courses (5)
(It is recommended that the 100-level introductory courses be taken in the intended chronological sequence)

  • ARTH 115 (IT) Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art History (1)
  • ARTH 116 (IT) Introduction to Renaissance and Early Modern Art History (1)
  • ARTH 117 (IT) Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art History (1)
  • ARTH 362 (W) Theories and Methodologies of Art History (1)
  • ARTH 496 (W) Art History Senior Seminar (1)

One course in Early or Asian Art History from the following (1)

  • ARTH 113 (IT) Introduction to Chinese Art History (1)
  • ARTH 114 (IT) Introduction to Japanese Art History (1)
  • ARTH 259 (TH) Western Medieval Art and Architecture (1)
  • ARTH 270 (TH) Roman Art and Architecture (1)
  • ARTH 271 (IT) Greek Art and Architecture (1)
  • ARTH 351 (W) Christian Iconography (1)

One course in Early Modern Art History from the following (1)

  • ARTH 263 (TH) Baroque and Neoclassical Vistual Culture (1)
  • ARTH 267 (TH) Renaissance Visual Culture (1)
  • ARTH 275 (IT) Art Literature and Criticism (1)

One course in Modern and Contemporary Art History from the following (1)

One Course in Studio Art (1)

  • One elective in Studio Art

Two additional courses in Art History (2)

  • Two electives in Art History

Requirements for Art History Minor (5 Credits)

Three Introductory Art History courses, from the following (3)

  • ARTH 113 (IT) Introduction to Chinese Art History (1) 
  • ARTH 114 (IT) Introduction to Japanese Art History (1)
  • ARTH 115 (IT) Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art History (1)
  • ARTH 116 (IT) Introduction to Renaissance and Early Modern Art History (1) 
  • ARTH 117 (IT) Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art History (1)

Two electives in Art History at the 200-level or above (2)

FACULTY

  • Roger P. Hull, Professor of Art History, Chair
  • Michael Boonstra, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art
  • Ricardo de Mambro Santos, Assistant Professor of Art History
  • Andries Fourie, Assistant Professor of Art
  • Kevin Greenwood, Instructor of Art History
  • Heidi Preuss Grew, Associate Professor of Art
  • Alexandra Opie, Assistant Professor of Art
  • Ann M. Nicgorski, Professor of Art History
  • James B. Thompson, Professor of Art

Course Listings

ARTH 113 (IT) Introduction to Chinese Art History (1)

This course is intended to introduce major protagonists, monuments and themes of Chinese art, architecture and visual culture. The chronological scope is vast, from prehistory to the present, and it is therefore a selective survey focusing on particular artistic traditions in depth, chosen from the major periods of Chinese history. Examples include prehistoric art, bronze ritual vessels, the renowned terra-cotta army, Buddhist sculpture, landscape painting, imperial architecture, scholars' gardens, Tibetan Buddhist art, art of the Cultural Revolution, and contemporary experimental art. The creation, reception and diffusion of selected art forms over time will be examined and interpreted using various analytical perspectives (such as formal, functional, iconographic, and expressive) in order to better appreciate their significance in a Chinese cultural context, and in relation to the history of Western interaction with Chinese art.

 Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 114 (IT) Introduction to Japanese Art History (1)

This course is intended to introduce major protagonists, monuments and themes of Japanese art, architecture and visual culture. The chronological scope is vast, from prehistory to the present, and it is therefore a selective survey focusing on particular artistic traditions in depth, chosen from the major periods of Japanese history. Examples include prehistoric art, Shinto architecture, early Buddhist art and architecture, art of Heian court, narrative handscroll painting, Kamakura Period sculpture, Zen and the arts, castles, gardens, Ukiyo-e prints, Meiji period decorative arts and Nihonga, and experimental art. The creation, reception and diffusion of selected art forms over time will be examined and interpreted using various analytical perspectives (such as formal, functional, iconographic, and expressive) in order to better appreciate their significance in a Japanese cultural context, and in relation to the history of Western interaction with Japanese art.

 Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: Greenwood

ARTH 115 (IT) Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art History (1)

This course is the first in a three-semester series intended to introduce the major protagonists, monuments and themes of Western art, architecture and visual culture. Chronologically, it will explore the production of architecture and artworks in diverse media from approximately 25,000 BCE to about 1300 CE, from the Paleolithic to the Gothic period. The course explores the visual cultures of prehistoric Europe, and Ancient Near East Egypt, Greece, Eturia, Rome and Byzantium, as well as Early Christian and Medieval Europe. The course will provide foundational skills of visual analysis as well as archaeological and historical interpretation in order to critically locate and understand the creation, reception and diffusion of visual codes, styles and techniques in an era prior to the modern conception of fine art. Some specific themes that will be explored include the representation of fertility and the female form. the commemoration of the dead, the employment of portraiture to convey political power, the creation of images of the divine, the use of the human body as a vehicle of expression, and the construction of sacred spaced.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 116 (IT) Introduction to Renaissance and Early Modern Art (1)

This course is the second in a three-semester series intended to introduce the major protagonists, monuments and themes of Western art, architecture and visual culture. Chronologically, it will explore the production and reception of artworks from the 14th to the end of the 18th century from the Early Renaissance to the Napoleonic period, the age of Neoclassicism. Special attention will be paid to formal, compositional and structural analysis of important artworks, in an attempt to establish a critically-based connection between styles, techniques and historical conditions. The course will also explore critical issues such as how art functioned in relation to religion or under the different systems of power, or why certain iconographies were more prominent than others in specific social contexts. Given the introductory approach of this class, the artistic production of certain masters (such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, and Canova) will be examined in a more detailed way, in order to examine the complex interplay of personal choices and normative patterns related to the process of creation of a visual artwork.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 117 (IT) Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art (1)

This course is the third of a three-semester series intended to introduce the major protagonists, monuments and themes of Western art, architecture and visual culture. Chronologically, it will explore the production and reception of artworks from the beginning of the 19th century to the beginning of the 21st century, from Romanticism to Post-Modernism. It will explore the increasing proliferation of images and the new ways they are conceived and diffused in different historical contexts, from the visions of German Romanticism to the aesthetic challenges addressed by contemporary artists working in a new, global scale. A substantial part of the class will be dedicated to the historical analysis of significant movements of European avant-gardes in the early 20th century, from the visual redefinitions of time-and-space inaugurated by Cubism to the exploration of the new territories of art and psychology undertaken by Surrealist masters. Discussions will also focus on the articulate ways in which art functions in relation to society, popular culture, and mass media in order to better understand how the dominions of creativity and visual communication affect us today.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 225 Monographic Studies in Art History (1)

The course will be organized according to one of three different modalities: first, to explore the works of a single artist belonging to a specific context; second, to analyze the characteristics of a certain period or movement in Art History in order to critically examine historiographical categories (such as "Gothic," "Renaissance," or "Modernism"); third, to investigate in detail a monument or a complex of monuments from structural, material and historical viewpoints. Conceived as a 200-level course, the class will focus on advanced lecture-based meetings as well as on group discussions in which various methodologies (from Iconology to Semiotics) will be applied. Consequently, one of the central goals of the course will be to provide a more sophisticated set of hermeneutic tools and an appropriate terminology of research to students. The choice among artists, movements and monuments will vary in accordance with the interests of student and faculty. This class may be repeated for credit with different topics.

Prerequisite: A 100-level art history course

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 257 (TH) Architecture in America (1)

This course presents a history of the development of American architecture from Colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on architectural styles and the relationship of style of historical periods and cultural assumptions. Focus is on the interplay of European architectural history with New World developments and transformations. The second half of the course heavily emphasizes late 19th and 20th century developments in Chicago, one of this nation's great architectural centers.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 259 (TH) Western Medieval Art and Architecture (1)

This course explores the development of the mostly Christian art and architecture of Western Europe during the Medieval period from its beginnings in the late Roman Empire to its most grandiose expression in the great Gothic cathedrals. Emphasis will be placed on the historical, social and political context of this artistic development. Issues to be considered include the impact of Western Medieval art of Byzantine art and culture, of the Crusades and the pilgrimage routes, and of the emergence of the monastery and the university. The role of patronage and women in the art and architecture of this period will also be discussed.  Other specific topics that will be covered include the art of the Early Christian catacombs, Hiberno-Saxon manuscript illumination, Charlemagne's palace chapel at Aachen, the Bayeus Tapestry, the pilgrimage church of St. Pierre at Moissac, and the sculptural program of Chartres Cathedral.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 263 (TH) Baroque and Neoclassical Visual Culture (1)

This course will explore the development of visual arts, architecture, and the increasing circulation of different kinds of images in Europe, as well as in other continents, from the beginning of the seventeenth century until the late eighteenth century. Particular attention will be dedicated to the analysis of specific artistic phenomena (for instance, the influential diffusion of Caravaggio's style in Europe, the appearance of new religious iconographies in the colonial areas, and the growing activity of European artists in other geographic regions, such as China and Japan). The course will also investigate the emergence of a new concept of art in the second half of the eighteenth century in relation to the poetics of Neoclassicism and the debates inaugurated by the theories of the Picturesque and the sublime.

Recommended: A 100-level art history course.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 267 (TH) Renaissance Visual Culture (1)

This course will cover important topics related to the production, reception and circulation of artworks, as well as other typologies of images, from the fourteenth century to the beginning of the seventeenth century, in the attempt to analyze significant problems connected to the making of Renaissance visual culture. By following recent methodological approaches such as Postcolonial criticism, Semiotics, and Gender Studies, this course will intentionally extend the geographic boundaries usually adopted by Renaissance scholars in order to explore the world of art and the increasing process of visual dissemination on a more global scale. The objects of the historical investigations, therefore, will not be exclusively centered in the forms of art produced in Europe, but also centered in the visual culture present in different colonial areas.

Recommended: A 100-level art history course.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 270 (TH; 4th Sem Lang Req) Roman Art and Architecture (1)

This course offers a comprehensive study of Roman civilization through its artistic and architectural monuments beginning with its roots in the Etruscan and Greek past, through the varied stylistic idioms of the Empire, to its gradual transformation in the Constantinian era, the prelude to the new Christian civilization of Byzantium. Topics include the Villa of the Mysteries, the Ara Pacis Augustae, the column of Trajan, Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli, and the Arch of Constantine. A special emphasis will also be placed on art historical methodology (i.e., which questions are posed, what evidence is cited and how meaning is construed) and on exploring issues of gender and private patronage as well as imperial propaganda and social policy.

Mode of Inquiry: Thinking Historically

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 271 (IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Greek Art and Architecture (1)

This course explores the development of historical Greek sculpture, painting, and architecture from its beginnings (ca. 1200 B.C.E.) to the end of the Hellenistic period (31 B.C.E.). Central themes include the Greek interest in mythological narrative, and the pursuit of idealism, naturalism, and ultimately, the expression of raw emotion. The classic expressions of Greek architecture, in their stylistic unity and variety, will also be studied, especially the way buildings serve different functions with a very limited architectural language. The course will address the role of archaeology in providing these artifacts with physical contexts and chronologies that enhance our knowledge of the material and our understanding of ancient Greek culture. Ancient literary sources will also be examined in order to place this material in its full religious, social, and political context.

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 275 (IT) Art Literature and Criticism (1)

This course will provide a set of interpretive tools and hermeneutic principles in order to critically analyze textual sources directly related to the dominion of Art History, from Antiquity to Modern period. The class will focus primarily on the study of significant primary sources, such as Vitruvius' influential book on Architecture or the Natural History by Pliny the Elder, as well as on different medieval treaties on art. The central part of the course, however, will be dedicated tot he philological analysis and the historical exegesis of Renaissance art treaties written by either humanists or artists such as Leon Battista Alberti, Cennino Cennini, Leonardo de Vinci and Giorgio Vasari. The class will also explore later sources (from seventeenth century France and Holland to eighteenth century England and Germany), in the attempt to establish the basis for an epistemological distinction between Art Literature and Art Criticism as complementary fields of research, equally indispensable for any historically-based investigation on art and visual culture.

Prerequisite: ARTH 100-level course

Mode of Inquiry: Interpreting Texts

  • Offering:
  • Professor: De Mambro Santos

ARTH 344 (W) American Art and Culture (1)

This writing-centered course explores the development of art and its changing significance in American culture from colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. Emphasis is on painting and prints (and to a lesser extent sculpture) as these developed from English colonial roots. Course themes include the effect of artistic domination of England and Europe on the colonial arts, the development of an "American approach" to creating and appreciating art and the de-emphasis but gradual acceptance of the arts as a means to "define" America, to romanticize (or criticize) its expansion, to celebrate its past, or to offer an introspective alternative to public, patriotic reality.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 345 Advanced Topics in Art History (1)

This course will provide specialized study in areas and themes of art history from different periods that are usually not included in the curriculum, or directly addressed in other courses (for instance, the representation of human body in Renaissance art, the development of the art market in 18th century England, falsifications and restorations in the art, etc.). As a 300-level class, the course will be primarily concerned with the development of more articulated methods of analysis and historical interpretation in order to allow students, on the one hand, to enlarge significantly their critical terminology and, on the other hand, to develop their metacritical skills. In other words, the acknowledgement of previous scholarly publications and a deeper recognition of current theories of art criticism will become central issues within their course, in the attempt to increase students' awareness of the historicity and the epistemological grounds of their own work. This class may be repeated for credit with different topics.

Prerequisite: A 100- or 200-level art history course.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 347 Islamic Law in Theory and Practice (1)

This course introduces students to the basics of Islamic Law; its history, its derivation, and efforts toward legal reform in the modern period. This course seeks to deconstruct Western depictions of Muslim law as rigid and coercive. It addresses the questions: Are there mechanisms for adaptation and reform in the face of changing times and varying geographical contexts? How does Islamic Law relate to Muslim conceptions of morality and spirituality?

  • Offering: Annually
  • Professor: Khan

ARTH 351 (W) Christian Iconography (1)

This writing-centered seminar presents a global overview of the development of Christian iconographic themes in artworks from the Early Christian period up to the present day. Diverse media including painting, sculpture, film, etc., will be considered in the study of one or more selected themes such as the Nativity, the Crucifixion, or St. Nicholas. Includes classic readings by the foremost scholar of iconographic studies and Christian art (e.g., Erwin Panofsky, Gertrude Schiller, Thomas Mathews, Hans Belting, David Freeberg, Margaret Miles, etc.) as well as readings in primary texts (e.g., the New Testament, the Christian apocrypha, and mystical literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance). Emphasis on writing (including a final research paper) as well as discussion and presentation skills.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-Centered

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: Nicgorski

ARTH 357 Twentieth Century Art (1)

Painting and sculpture of the 20th century in Europe and America. Emphasis on the nature of modernism and the role of the avant garde in Europe. American developments after 1940.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Professor: Hull

ARTH 362 (W) Theories and Methodologies of Art History (1)

This course seeks to provide an overview of the history of art history. Its main subject will be art history as a specific field of research in the attempt to understand its epistemological boundaries as well as its ramified network of connections with other disciplines, such as Literary Criticism, Anthropology, Semiotics, Social History, Philosophy, Gender Studies, and Film Studies. The course will thereby survey the various methodological approaches to art history in an interdisciplinary way, starting with a close examination of traditional art historical tools and concepts of analysis: style, form, iconography. It will explore art history as a literary genre since the sixteenth century and as an academic discipline from the nineteenth century until the so-called "linguistic turn" in the 1960s. Particular focus will also be dedicated to theoretical questions that arise in the interpretation of contemporary art and culture. Case studies will provide a set of concrete examples of practical applications of each method, in order to introduce specialized terminologies and to explore critical ways of thinking.

Prerequisite: A 200-level art history course

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-Centered

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Professor: de Mambro Santos

ARTH 372-373 Independent Study in Art History I and II (.5 or 1)

Reading and conference for advanced students in art history.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Professor: Staff

ARTH 496 (W) Art History Senior Seminar  (1)

This course is exclusively devoted to the process of research and writing of the final thesis for Art History majors. It is, therefore, the epistemological continuation of ARTH 362W (Theories and Methodologies of Art History). The class will consist of weekly meetings in which students will discuss topics, methods and interpretive issues directly related to the writing of their thesis, in order to acknowledge the gradual advancement of their individual research. To that purpose, students will be required to prepare, within specific deadlines, drafts of their work to be read and critiqued by their thesis advisors. As a logical consequence of this pedagogical agenda, class meetings, as well as office hours, will be primarily dedicated to the discussion of issues relating to the preparation of the written thesis, such as bibliographical matters, historical clarifications, critical suggestions, and methodological assessments. At the end of the semester, as a formal conclusion of the course, students will be required to deliver an oral presentation of their thesis in which they are expected to critically present the most significant results of their research.

Prerequisites: ARTH 362W, Art History major, senior standing.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

  • Offering: Spring
  • Professor: Staff

ARTS 112 (CA) Color and Composition (1)

Studio demonstrations are given concerning the processes used to produce two-dimensional images which utilize color as the primary visual medium. A series of studio problems is used to provide direct experience with the instruments and materials employed to produce color surfaces.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 113 (CA) Fundamentals of Design (1)

Lectures and creative work in the theoretical and practical use of basic principles underlying the structure of the visual arts through studio practice in handling the elements of color, volume, space, line and texture in various media.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 114 (CA) Three-Dimensional Design (1)

This course introduces the fundamental sculptural principles of space, line, shape, mass, texture, unity, balance, emphasis and scale. The processes of linear, planar, modular and plastic construction will be undertaken. Emphasis will be on students discussing and understanding the principles of three-dimensional design as well as executing studio projects characterized by quality craft and successful composition.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Fourie

ARTS 116 (CA) Ways of Drawing (1)

Studio demonstrations are given concerning the processes used to produce drawings on two-dimensional surfaces. A series of studio problems is used to provide direct experience with the instruments and materials employed to produce drawing surfaces. Demonstrations and lectures.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Triennially in fall
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 117 (CA) Exploring Visual Art (1)

Students will create works of art utilizing a variety of techniques. They will begin with two-dimensional media such as drawing, painting, and/or collage, and progress to three-dimensional media including clay and other materials. Independent research, visits to the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, and occasional lectures by guest artists or art historians outside of class required.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 121 New Media Art Fundamentals (1)

New Media Art Fundamentals introduces creative research strategies that are project- and concept-centered. Introductory approaches to video art, installation, performance and sound are explored. Students combine the study of many media to explore the representation of their ideas. Informed by the history and theoretical tenets of the medium and with the help of faculty-directed asignments, students learn to generate creative ideas, connect form to content, and realize studio projects.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 131 Etching I (1)

Studio demonstrations are given in the use of tools and materials that are required to produce etchings. Black and white printing techniques are introduced with an emphasis on drawing systems and design. Open to beginning printmakers.

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 210 (CA) Introduction to Sculpture (1)

This course will introduce students to the fundamental sculptural processes of addition, subtraction and substitution. Emphasis will be on students executing, understanding and discussing quality craft, successful composition, productive conceptualization and creative problem solving. Students will explore various sculptural methods including steel fabrication, wood construction, plaster construction, assemblage and mold-making.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Fourie

ARTS 216 Video Art I (1)

This course introduces video as a medium for artistic expression, personal and social inquiry. Students gain an understanding of the video art-making process and develop proficiency with video equipment, using single-camera shooting and non-linear editing. Assigned work will guide students in exploration of video as an art-making tool. Theoretical texts and work by video artists will be viewed and discussed.

Prerequisite: ARTS 112, 113, 114, 116, 117, 121

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 231 Etching II (1)

Studio demonstrations are given in the use of tools and materials needed to produce etchings. Color printing techniques are introduced with an emphasis on modern and contemporary techniques.

Prerequisite: ARTS 131 or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 232 Photography I (1)

This course introduces technical and conceptual uses of black and white photography. Students explore technique through shooting, developing and darkroom printing of 35mm film. Periodic student presentations and critiques of artwork address uses of photography as an art form to communicate ideas. A 35mm SLR camera with fully manual settings and a 50mm lens is required.

Prerequisite: ARTS 112, 113, 114, 116, 117 or 121.

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 235 Painting (1)

A series of studio problems using systems of design, composition and techniques that study past and modern problems in painting. Demonstrations are presented to show the integration of past drawing systems in the making of paintings. Open to beginning students.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 236 Contemporary Painting Techniques and Concepts (1)

A series of studio problems using systems of design, composition and techniques that study current problems in contemporary painting. Open to beginning students.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 240 Life Drawing (1)

Lectures and creative studio work in drawing from the figure and still life. The figure's role in the evolution of artistic expressions and as inspiration to the many periods in the art of Western civilization. Various media: pencil, ink, pastel.

Recommended Prerequisite: ARTS 100 level course

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 241 Figure Drawing (1)

Lectures and creative work in drawing from the human figure. Various media: charcoal, graphite, ink, and conte.  Previous drawing experience strongly recommended.

Prerequisite: ARTS 100 level course

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Grew

ARTS 242 Woodcuts and Collagraphs (1)

A series of studio problems introducing students to the materials and tools needed to produce woodcuts and collagraphs printed in both black and white and color. Demonstrations, assignments and lectures stress the relief nature of the printing surfaces. Offered to beginning and advanced-level printmakers.

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 243 Monoprinting (1)

A series of studio problems introducing students to the materials and tools needed to produce monoprints. Monoprints are images that are not reproduced in an edition and thus are unique prints. Demonstrations are given in black and white and color printing. Stress is placed on integrating drawing and painting ideas in the prints. Offered to beginning and advanced-level printmakers.

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 244 (CA) Topics in Sculpture (1)

This course allows students to conduct an in depth, focused exploration of topics, genres and modes of expression not covered by the regular sculpture curriculum, and could address such areas as: sculptural installation, site specific sculpture, the sculpture of the body/figure, multi-media sculpture, environmental sculpture, sculpture and the preformative aspect, and the found object in sculpture. The class will focus on one assigned topic, and the topic will vary from semester to semester. An experimental, innovative approach to the topic will be encouraged. May be repeated for credit if the topics varies.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Fourie

ARTS 245 Introduction to Ceramics (1)

The use of various clays will be explored in two-dimensional and three-dimensional design. Handbuilding, wheel work, glaze application and firing techniques will be pursued.

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 315 Installation Art (1)

This course introduces students to installation art studio practices. This course explores installation art in all media. Students will incorporate a variety of media including video, performance art, photography, painting, projected light, sound, and sculptural materials in works that expand the physical boundaries of art beyond the discrete object. The class views and discusses key contemporary works and related critical writings.

Prerequisite: ARTS 216, 232, 236 or 244

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 316 (CA) Video Art II (1)

Video Art II focuses on the use of video as an artistic medium. Students are encouraged to work experimentally and are expected to achieve a level of technical competence and confidence necessary to undertake ambitious creative work. Technical demonstrations expand students' knowledge of image/sound manipulations, capture, and editing techniques. The class views and discusses key contemporary works and related critical writings.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 216

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 340 (CA) Concepts of Sculpture (1)

This course focuses on the relationship between idea, form and material. Students will be required to produce a series of sculptures that explore one specific idea, concept, personal or social issue of their choice. Metaphor and symbolism will be examined and used as a vehicle for communicating meaning. Emphasis will be placed on the unity of the body of work being produced as well as on clarity, craftsmanship and presentation. Students will also be expected to analyze critically the use of conceptual content in contemporary sculpture.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Fourie

ARTS 341 (CA) Material Exploration in Sculpture (1)

This course requires students to pick a specific sculptural material and to examine thoroughly its inherent meaning, physical properties, qualities and characteristics for three-dimensional expression. The structure of the course will allow the student to produce a unified body of work that reflects his/her specific interest. Emphasis will be on experimentation, the development of technical skill, and creative problem solving. The course will also involve a critical analysis on the use of materials by prominent contemporary sculptors.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Professor: Fourie

ARTS 346 (CA) Ceramic Vessel Construction (1)

This studio course will devote equal time to handbuilding and wheel throwing as methods of vessel construction. The course will focus on form, design, function, and craftsmanship.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 245

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 347 (CA) Ceramic Sculpture (1)

This course introduces students to sculptural ideas executed in various hand construction techniques including slab, coil, press mold, etc. Students will explore how the unique physical characteristics of clay can contribute to the content of the work. Emphasis will be on process, exploration, and discussion.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 245

  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 349 (CA) Ceramic Surface Techniques (1)

This course provides a variety of approaches to surface techniques including relief, drawing, printing, slip painting, texturing, and advanced glaze application. The course is open to students interested in vessels or sculpture.

Mode of Inquiry: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: ARTS 245

  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 357 Photography II (1)

This course extends and elaborates on the skills developed in ARTS 232. Through a series of individual projects of increasing complexity, the student will be introduced to alternative and experimental techniques in black and white photography. Use of color digital photography will also be explored. Emphasis on the photographic process as a creative medium will be stressed throughout the course as students are encouraged to develop personal imagery.

Prerequisites: ARTS 232

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Opie

ARTS 360-377 Independent Projects (1)

For advanced art students. Individual study and work in areas of the Art major's special interest. Printmaking (360 and 361), Painting (362 and 363), Drawing (364 and 365), Ceramics (366 and 367), Sculpture (368 and 369), Design (370 and 371), Jewelry (372 and 373), Photography (374 and 375), and Electronic Media (376 and 377).

  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

ARTS 381 Advanced Media and Design (1)

Advanced studio work to permit the student to achieve a high level of competence in a selected area of interest. The student is expected, in consultation with the instructor, to identify and solve specific problems which will develop in depth an understanding and appreciation of the tools, materials and ideas used.

Prerequisite: Studio Art majors with junior standing, or consent of instructor

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Thompson

ARTS 440 (W) Writing for Artists (1)

This writing-centered course explores the variety of ways that artists need to communicate verbally for success as a developing professional. Topics will include writing an artist statement, reviews of work, grant and project proposals, research and discussion of issues directly relating to artists, and personal reflection upon the creative process. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues in the arts. Special topics will develop from guest artists and professionals in art administration, museums, galleries, and non-profit organizations.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: Senior Art Studio Majors only.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Grew, Fourie, Opie

ARTS 496 (CA) Senior Seminar (0.5 Fall; 0.5 Spring)

The Senior Seminar is the culminating experience in the Studio Art major program. The seminar is devoted to all aspects of conceptualizing and preparing a major work or series of work for final exhibition in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Students work on their senior projects independently throughout fall and spring semesters with supervision of one or more studio faculty advisor. Special guest lecturers and topics also presented. This is offered as a single, year-long course. The credit is divided 0.5 in the Fall and 0.5 in the Spring. You must register for it each semester.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Creating in the Arts

Prerequisite: Senior Studio Art Majors only

  • Offering: Fall/Spring
  • Instructor: Grew, Fourie, Thompson, Opie