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Willamette University

900 State Street
Salem, Oregon 97301

503-370-6300 voice

General Education

The curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts and its extracurricular activities are intended to help students achieve three basic goals: (1) to acquire by means of scholarship a rich knowledge of facts and concepts; (2) to enhance one's capacity for tolerance, for responsibility toward the natural world, and for judgment in ethics and the arts; and (3) to develop intellectual curiosity and lifelong habits of independent learning.

The intellectual atmosphere at Willamette University, including classroom and extracurricular activities, fosters all three goals and encourages a sense of community that nourishes intellectual inquiry, multicultural awareness, environmental responsibility, and moral sensibility.

Major requirements ensure depth as well as breadth of study. Sustained inquiry in a major allows students to learn material in greater depth and detail than is possible in introductory courses, and to achieve competence in specific research methodologies and in oral and written communication skills.

To complement the depth of study in the major, the General Education Program is designed to develop students' ability to apply overlapping forms of scholarship and investigation in responding to the world around them, solving problems, and establishing the habits of mind and intellectual framework necessary for a lifetime of learning.

The College Colloquium

The College Colloquium is a one-semester seminar required of all entering first-year students. Taught by faculty across the curriculum and encompassing a wide diversity of topics, each seminar provides a challenging and engaging introduction to the liberal arts curriculum by focusing on close reading, writing, discussion, and critical thinking.

Seminars are small, averaging 12 to 14 students. The seminar teacher is also the academic advisor to each student in his or her seminar.

Three Writing-Centered Courses

All entering students become part of the writing culture at Willamette through a series of writing-centered courses taken throughout their college careers. The program, which was initiated in 1995-96, has two central goals: the use of writing to develop understanding of course content across the disciplines, and the progressive development of fluency in writing for a variety of audiences, both general and disciplinary.

The Writing Center, housed in Matthews Hall, supports the program by providing opportunities for students at all levels to confer individually with faculty and peer consultants about their writing.

For single majors, additional courses will include a writing-centered credit in the major, a writing-centered credit outside the major, and a writing-centered credit in any field (inside or outside the major). At least one of these credits must be an upper-division course at the 300 or 400 level. For double majors, additional courses will include a writing-centered credit in the first major, a writing-centered credit in the second major, and a writing-centered credit in any field (inside or outside the major). At least one of these credits must be an upper-division course at the 300 or 400 level.

Most transfer students will be required to take three writing-centered courses, as described above, provided the student has taken the equivalent of one credit of a course similar to our writing-centered course offerings. A transfer student who has had no equivalent course will be required to take four writing-centered courses.

Students transferring in as juniors may request transfer credit for a writing-centered course by submitting a petition. This option will be extended to junior transfers during the admission process. Petition forms are available in the Registrar's Office, or on the Writing Center website. The deadline for exercising this option will be the end of their first semester at Willamette. Junior transfer students whose petitions are granted will be required to take two writing-centered courses, one in their major and one upper-division course outside of their major.

Writing-centered courses to be offered each semester will be designated by a W in the Schedule of Classes, and students must pass four of these with a grade of C- or higher in order to complete the Writing Program. The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet writing program requirements:

  • AES 491 (W) Independent Study in American Ethnic Studies
  • AMST 250 (W) American Cultural Perspectives
  • AMST 496 (W) Senior Seminar in American Studies
  • ANTH 356 (W) Language and Culture
  • ANTH 361 (W) Ethnographic Methods
  • ANTH 499 (W) Senior Seminar
  • ARTH 344 (W) American Art and Culture
  • ARTH 351 (W) Christian Iconography
  • ARTH 362 (W) Theories and Methodologies of Art History
  • ARTH 496 (W) Senior Seminar and Thesis
  • ARTS 440 (W) Writing for Artists
  • ASIA 499 (W) Senior Seminar
  • BIOL 210 (W; NW) Biodiversity: Discovering Life
  • BIOL 221 (W; NW) Microbes and Infectious Diseases
  • BIOL 350 (W) Molecular Genetics
  • BIOL 351 (W) Animal Physiology
  • BIOL 352 (W) Plant Systematics and Evolution
  • BIOL 353 (W) Behavioral Ecology
  • BIOL 354 (W) Advanced Microbiology
  • BIOL 356 (W) Plant Molecular Biology
  • BIOL 358 (W) Developmental Biology
  • BIOL 359 (W) Molecular Ecology
  • CHEM 495 (W) Senior Research Projects I
  • CHEM 496 (W) Senior Research Projects II
  • CHNSE 490, 491 (W) Reading and Conference
  • CHNSE 499 (W) Senior Seminar
  • CLAS 244 (W) The Greek and Roman Stage
  • CLAS 250 (W) Greeks, Romans and Barbarians
  • CLAS 496 (W) Senior Seminar in Classics
  • CLHI 497 (W) Humanities Senior Seminar
  • CS 495 (W) Senior Seminar in Computer Science I
  • CS 496 (W) Senior Seminar in Computer Science
  • ECON 444 (W) Urban Economics
  • ECON 470 (W) Advanced Topics in Economics
  • ECON 496 (W) Senior Research Seminar
  • EDUC 305 (W) Introduction to Teaching
  • EDUC 335 (W) The School, Teacher and Student
  • ENGL 116 (W; IT) Topics in American Literature
  • ENGL 117 (W; IT) Topics in British Literature
  • ENGL 118 (W; IT) Topics in World Literature
  • ENGL 119 (W; IT) Forms of Literature: The Art of Reading Poetry, Drama, Fiction
  • ENGL 134 (W) Writing Across Cultures
  • ENGL 135 (W; CA) Creative Writing
  • ENGL 137 (W) Writing Workshop
  • ENGL 202 (W; IT) Introduction to Literary Theory
  • ENGL 242 (W) The Essay
  • ENGL 254 (W) Literature of American West
  • ENGL 255 (W) Literature of the American South
  • ENGL 256 (W) Literature of the American Northwest
  • ENGL 329 (W) Creative Non-fiction
  • ENGL 355 (W) Feminist Criticism
  • ENGL 499 (W) Senior Seminar in English
  • ENVR 327 (W) Water Resources
  • ENVR 332 (W) Sustainable Agriculture for the 21st Century
  • ENVR 496 (W) Senior Seminar in Environmental Science
  • ERTH 350 (W) Environmental Geology
  • EXSCI 356 (W) Research Design in Exercise Science
  • FILM 210 (W) History of Cinema: The Rise of Classical Narrative
  • FREN 332 (W) Advanced French Composition and Discussion
  • FREN 492 (W) Research and Discussion of Selected Topics in Literature
  • GERM 331 (W) German Composition and Discussion
  • GERM 496 (W) Senior Seminar
  • GREEK 350 (W; TH; 4th Sem Req) Greeks, Romans, and Barbarians: Reading in Greek
  • HIST 301 (W) Themes in American Social History
  • HIST 390 (W) Germany from Bismarck to Hitler
  • HIST 440 (W; TH) History of Modern Socialism
  • HIST 442 (W) The Holocaust
  • HIST 444 (W) Seminar in Historiography and Philosophy of History
  • HIST 452 (W) Topics in Chinese/Japanese History
  • HIST 453 (W) Social History Practicum: Local History
  • HIST 495 (W) Medieval England and Ireland: The Age of Bede, c. 600-740
  • HIST 499 (W) Senior Tutorial
  • HUM 497 (W) Humanities Senior Seminar
  • IDS 135 (W; CA) Interdisciplinary Performance Workshop
  • IDS 165 (W) Journalistic Writing I
  • IDS 167 (W) Journalistic Writing II
  • IDS 203 (W) Intercultural Study within Cultural Immersion
  • IDS 260 (W; NW) Women Naturalists of the Western Americas
  • IDS 325 (W) Field Studies in Hawaii
  • IDS 327 (W; AR) The American Story and the Legacy of Vietnam
  • IDS 330 (W) Science Studies
  • IDS 336 (W) Field Studies in Ecuador: A Perspective on Latin America
  • IDS 351 (W) Culture of Ancient Greece
  • IDS 423 (W) Literature of Natural Science
  • INTST 499 (W) Seminar in International Studies
  • JAPN 201 (W) Modern Japanese Society and Culture
  • JAPN 314 (W; IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Japanese Literature in Translation
  • JAPN 499 (W) Senior Seminar
  • LAS 497 (W) Senior Thesis in Latin American Studies
  • LATIN 350 (W) Readings in Caesar and Tacitus: Greeks, Romans and Barbarians
  • MATH 251 (W) Foundations of Advanced Mathematics
  • MUSC 118 (W) Mozart: His Life, Times and Music
  • MUSC 241 (W; TH) Music History I
  • MUSC 331 (W) Advanced Topics in Music Theory and Analysis
  • PHIL 235 (W) Philosophical Ethics
  • PHIL 330 (W) Social and Political Philosophy
  • PHIL 360 (W) Philosophy of the Mind
  • PHIL 370 (W) Philosophy of Language
  • PHIL 492 (W) Philosophy Senior Seminar: Writing Philosophy
  • PHYS 396 (W) Advanced Techniques in Experimental Physics
  • POLI 124 (W; AR) Colloquium: Patriotism
  • POLI 213 (W; IT) Writing Political Philosophy: Individuality and Community
  • POLI 304 (W; AR) Politics of Environmental Ethics
  • POLI 311 (W; IT) Writing Political Humor
  • POLI 315 (W) Topics in Politics: Explaining Nazism
  • POLI 326 (W) Globalization and Equity
  • POLI 351 (W) Women in American Politics
  • POLI 370 (W) Europe and the International System
  • POLI 378 (W) Nations and the International System
  • POLI 480 (W) Senior Thesis
  • PSYC 252 (W; QA) Research Methods and Analysis
  • PSYC 371 (W) Topics in Psychology
  • PSYC 431 (W) Topical Seminar in Psychology
  • REL 335 (W) The Legacy of Paul
  • REL 385 (W) Theory and Method in Religious Studies
  • REL 437 (W) Archaeological Field Experience
  • REL 444 (W) Kant, Critique of the Power of Judgment
  • REL 496 (W) Directed Senior Thesis
  • REL 498 (W) Heidegger and Theology: Being and Time
  • RHET 210 (W; AR; IT) Media and the Environment
  • RHET 261 (W) Rhetorical Criticism
  • RHET 333 (W) Political Communication
  • RHET 362 (W) Media Framing
  • RHET 372 (W) Metaphor and Communication
  • RHET 496 (W) Seminar in Rhetoric and Media Studies
  • RUSS 233 (W; TH) Russian Culture: Russian Ways and Views of Russians
  • RUSS 242 (W) Great Short Stories from Russian
  • RUSS 320 (W; IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Introduction to Russian Literature in Translation
  • RUSS 490 (W) Reading and Conference
  • SOC 121 (W) Gender Roles in Society
  • SOC 132 (W, US) Sport and Society
  • SOC 430 (W) Families
  • SOC 435 (W) Group Dynamics and Organizational Culture
  • SOC 437 (W) Power in Society
  • SPAN 331 (W) Spanish Composition and Discussion
  • SPAN 497 (W) Research and Discussion of Selected Topics in Literature
  • THTR 217 (W) Theater History I
  • THTR 318 (W) Performance in the 20th Century
  • THTR 499 (W) Senior Thesis
  • WGS 353 (W) Feminist Theory

Two Quantitative and Analytical Reasoning Courses

Quantitative reasoning is a versatile and powerful way to understand the world. Graduates of Willamette University should be conversant with mathematics and quantitative reasoning, and should learn to apply quantitative reasoning to understand and solve everyday problems. Formal reasoning and logic are central to decision-making in an uncertain world and are essential to a liberal arts education.

To satisfy the Quantitative and Analytical Reasoning requirement, students will be required to receive credit for two courses. At least one of these credits must be designated by an asterisk (*) in the following list. Courses with the asterisk (*) designation are designed to expand students' quantitative boundaries and provide them with the skills necessary to interpret and apply mathematics.

The other courses designated to fulfill this requirement are those in which quantitative reasoning and/or mathematical analysis are at the core of understanding the context of the course. These courses may be disciplinary-based applications of quantitative methodology, like physics or computer science, or may be mathematics and statistics courses. Whether applied or theoretical, the key characteristic of these courses is that the concepts in them cannot be grasped without an understanding of quantitative methods.

The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet the Quantitative and Analytical Reasoning requirement (minimum grade of C- required):

  • CHEM 116 (QA) Introductory Chemistry II
  • CS 130 (QA) Computing Concepts and Problem Solving
  • CS 141 (QA*) Introduction to Programming
  • CS 145 (QA*) Images and Imagination
  • CS 241 (QA) Introduction to Computer Science: Data Structures
  • ECON 230 (QA*) Economic Statistics
  • ECON 452 (QA) Introduction to Econometrics and Forecasting
  • ERTH 333 (QA) Geographic Information Systems
  • MATH 130 (QA*) Contemporary Mathematics
  • MATH 138 (QA*) Statistics
  • MATH 141 (QA*) Calculus I
  • MATH 142 (QA*) Calculus II
  • MATH 163 (QA*) Discrete Mathematics
  • MATH 220 (QA) Mathematics for Elementary Teachers
  • MATH 249 (QA*) Multivariable Calculus
  • MATH 253 (QA) Linear Algebra
  • MATH 256 (QA) Differential Equations
  • PHIL 140 (QA) Symbolic Logic
  • PHYS 221 (QA; NW) Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 222 (QA; NW) Introductory Physics II
  • PSYC 252 (QA; W) Research Methods and Analysis I
  • PSYC 253 (QA*) Research Methods and Analysis II
  • SOC 301 (QA*) Social Statistics

Study in a language other than English

There are three ways of satisfying the Language requirement:

  1. Complete the fourth semester (L232) or higher of a foreign language course with a minimum grade of C-; or pass an examination demonstrating the equivalent of two years of college language study (e.g., achieve a minimum score of 4 on the AP exam; achieve a score of 5 or better on the higher level International Baccalaureate exam; pass an exam administered by one of the following departments: Classics, French, German and Russian, Japanese and Chinese, or Spanish); or present evidence of a primary language other than English to the Registrar's Office.
  2. Complete the second semester (or higher) of a foreign language course (L132) with a minimum grade of C-, plus one additional semester of intensive study abroad in that language (the foreign study program must be approved and must fulfill Willamette's requirements).
  3. Complete the third semester of a foreign language course (L231) with a minimum grade of C-, plus one semester of a course (possibly taught in English) that normally deals with the culture or literature of the language studied, or with linguistics. The courses below are currently approved by the faculty to meet the 4th semester language requirement.

French

  • FREN 241 (4th Sem Lang Req) Topics in French History through Film

German

  • GERM 241 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT) Topics in German Culture (in translation)
  • HIST 390 (W) Germany from Bismarck to Hitler
  • PHIL 354 (4th Sem Lang Req) Nietzche and Philosophy

Greek

  • ARTH 271 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT) Greek Art and Architecture
  • CLAS 171 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT) Love and War, Gods and Heroes: Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
  • CLAS 244 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT; W) The Greek and Roman Stage
  • CLAS 247 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT) Women in Roman Literature and Life
  • CLAS 250 (4th Sem Lang Req; TH) Greeks, Romans and Barbarians
  • CLAS 260 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT) Gender and Sexuality in Greek Society [Crosslisted/WGS 260]
  • CLAS 351 (4th Sem Lang Req; US) Greek and Near Eastern Religion
  • GREEK 350 (4th Sem Lang Req; W; TH) Greeks, Romans an Barbarians: Readings in Greek

Hebrew

  • REL 340 (4th Sem Lang Req) Hebrew Torah/Pentateuch

Japanese

  • JAPN 314 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT; W) Japanese Literature in Translation

Latin

  • ARTH 270 (4th Sem Lang Req; TH) Roman Art and Architecture
  • CLAS 171 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT) Love and War, Gods and Heroes: Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
  • CLAS 244 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT, W) The Greek and Roman Stage
  • CLAS 247 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT) Women in Roman Literature and Life
  • CLAS 250 (4th Sem Lang Req; TH) Greeks, Romans and Barbarians

Russian

  • RUSS 233 (4th Sem Lang Req; TH; W) Russian Culture: Russian Ways and View of Russia
  • RUSS 235 (rth Sem Lang Req; IT) Russian and Soviet Cinema
  • RUSS 320 (4th Sem Lang Req; IT; W) Russian Literature in Translation

Spanish

  • IDS 336 (4th Sem Lang Req; W) Field Studies in Ecuador: A Perspective on Latin America
  • SPAN 260 (4th Sem Lang Req) Hispanic Literature in Translation

Modes of Inquiry Courses

Students are required to complete work (with a minimum grade of C-) in six broadly defined Modes of Inquiry; although these six experiences can be acquired in a variety of contexts, the Willamette faculty believes they can best be learned in general education courses that are explicitly designed for all students. The range of courses available allows students a great deal of choice and flexibility in constructing their general education program. Courses satisfying the Modes of Inquiry may be confined to a single discipline, or may be interdisciplinary in their approaches as well as content. Modes of Inquiry courses may be designed and designated to satisfy one or possibly two of the six categories, but not more than two. Those designated for two categories must meet the full requirements and conditions of both Modes. Even though courses may be designated to satisfy two categories, each student must take at least five courses in satisfying the six requirements. In addition, students will not be allowed to satisfy more than two of the Modes with courses from any single department.

Following are brief descriptions of the six Modes of Inquiry. Please note that courses from a variety of disciplines will be designated to fulfill each Mode.

Understanding the Natural World (NW)

Courses satisfying this requirement apply the methodology of science to examine the natural world. These courses include a laboratory or field component in which students investigate natural phenomena. Students in these courses should:

  • learn and apply the scientific method;
  • recognize science as a creative enterprise;
  • experience science as an investigative, inquiry-driven activity;
  • acquire the skills to operate the instrumentation of laboratory and/or field;
  • understand the power of theory, models, and prediction.

The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet the Understanding the Natural World requirement:

  • BIOL 110 (NW) Principles of Biology
  • BIOL 112 (NW) Human Heredity: Principles and Issues
  • BIOL 210 (NW; W) Biodiversity: Discovering Life
  • BIOL 221 (NW; W) Microbes and Infectious Diseases
  • CHEM 110 (NW) Chemical Concepts and Applications
  • CHEM 115 (NW) Introductory Chemistry I
  • ERTH 110 (NW) Physical Geology
  • ERTH 112 (NW) Physical Geography
  • IDS 140 (NW) Introduction to Cognitive Science
  • IDS 220 (NW; AR) The Body in Science and Society
  • IDS 222 (NW) Fundamentals of Neuroscience
  • IDS 260 (NW; W) Women Naturalists of the Western Americas
  • PHYS 110 (NW) Astronomy
  • PHYS 221 (QA; NW) Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 222 (QA; NW) Introductory Physics II
  • PSYC 130 (NW) Evolutionary Psychology

Creating in the Arts (CA)

Courses satisfying this requirement seek to provide an understanding of the creative process as a means of discovery, exploration, and self-expression. Students in these courses should:

  • acquire basic experience in an artistic medium;
  • develop an understanding and appreciation for process in creative expression;
  • negotiate between conceptual ideas and spontaneous opportunity/discovery;
  • discover expression;
  • exhibit or present their work publicly, at least within the classroom.

The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet the Creating in the Arts requirement:

* To receive Creating in the Arts credit in Music Ensemble courses, students must take four compatible Music Ensemble courses.

** To complete the Creating in the Arts credit in dance classes, students must satisfactorily complete two of THTR 175, 180, 181, 182, 282, 283, 284, and 384 OR a student may repeat any one of these classes in order to fulfill the CA requirement.

Analyzing Arguments, Reasons, and Values (AR)

Courses satisfying this requirement focus on the critical analysis and evaluation of the principles of reasoned normative discourse. Students in these courses should:

  • understand the nature and structure of arguments;
  • know how to apply various criteria of evaluation to arguments;
  • recognize that it is possible to reason and draw meaningful conclusions about matters of ethical or aesthetic value.

The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet the Analyzing Arguments, Reasons, and Values requirement:

  • ANTH 351 (AR) Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights, and the Environment
  • ENGL 336 (AR) Visible Evidence: The History and Theory of Documentary Film
  • IDS 220 (AR; NW) The Body in Science and Society
  • IDS 321 (AR) Ethics in the American Tradition
  • IDS 327 (AR; W) The American Story and the Legacy of Vietnam
  • PHIL 110 (AR) Philosophical Problems
  • PHIL 150 (AR) Reason and Value in Plato's Republic
  • PHIL 242 (AR) What is Art?
  • POLI 123 (AR) Colloquium: Citizenship and Apathy
  • POLI 124 (AR) Colloquium: Patriotism
  • POLI 203 (AR) Themes in Political Theory
  • POLI 303 (AR) Topics in Political Theory
  • POLI 304 (W; AR) Politics of Environmental Ethics
  • POLI 314 (AR) Politics in Religion in the United States
  • PSYC 210 (AR) Introduction to Psychology
  • REL 115 (AR) Introduction to the Study of Religion
  • REL 334 (AR) Liberation Theology and Social Change
  • REL 370 (AR) Ethics and Vocation
  • RHET 062X (AR) Intercollegiate Debate
  • RHET 150 (AR) Public Speaking
  • RHET 160 (AR) Argumentation and Society
  • RHET 210 (W; AR; IT) Media and the Environment
  • RHET 232 (AR) Persuasion, Propaganda and Mass Media
  • RHET 244 (AR; IT) Latino/Latina Voices in the U.S.

Thinking Historically (TH)

Courses satisfying this requirement develop students' understanding of the temporal dimension of human social existence. By studying historical periods and cultures, students in these courses should:

  • understand how human consciousness, action and agency are historically embedded;
  • perceive the relation of change and continuity in human experience;
  • experience how the study of the past helps one to make sense of the present and to anticipate the future.

The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet the Thinking Historically requirement:

  • ANTH 231 (TH; US) Native North American Cultures
  • ARTH 257 (TH) Architecture in America
  • ARTH 259 (TH; W) Western Medieval Art and Architecture
  • ARTH 263 (TH) Baroque and Neoclassical Visual Culture
  • ARTH 267 (TH) Renaissance Visual Culture
  • ARTH 270 (TH) Roman Art and Architecture
  • CLAS 250 (TH; 4th Sem Lang Req) Greeks, Romans and Barbarians 
  • ENVR 326 (TH) Environmental History
  • GREEK 350 (TH; W; 4th Sem Lang Req) Greeks, Romans and Barbarians: Readings in Greek
  • HIST 113 (TH) Topics in United States History: Early Period
  • HIST 115 (TH) Western Civilization to 1650
  • HIST 116 (TH) Western Civilization since 1650
  • HIST 117 (TH) East Asian Civilization to 1800
  • HIST 118 (TH) East Asian Civilization since 1800
  • HIST 131 (TH) Historical Inquiry
  • HIST 233 (TH) Asian Empires on the Silk Road
  • HIST 255 (TH) Cities and the Making of Modern Europe: 1750 to Present
  • HIST 265 (TH) Late Imperial China
  • HIST 282 (TH) China in Revolution, 1911 - 1949
  • HIST 315 (TH) Western Civilization and Sustainability: Beginnings to 1600
  • HIST 381 (TH) History of Modern Japan
  • HIST 440 (W; TH) History of Modern Socialism
  • IDS 251 (TH) African Film Discourse
  • LAS 350 (TH; IT) Mesoamerican Civilizations
  • LATIN 350 (TH) Readings in Caesar and Tacitus: Greeks, Romans, and Barbarians
  • MUSC 241 (TH; W) Music History I
  • POLI 125 (TH) Technology, Power, and Social Change
  • POLI 212 (TH) History of Western Political Philosophy
  • POLI 372 (TH) American Foreign Policy
  • REL 113 (TH) Introduction to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
  • REL 214 (TH) Religion in America
  • REL 233 (TH) Religions Along the Silk Road
  • RUSS 233 (TH; 4th Sem Lang Req; W) Russian Culture: Russian Ways and Views of Russia [Crosslisted with HIST 233]
  • SPAN 333 (TH) Hispanic Civilization
  • SPAN 335 (TH) Cultural Institutions of Spain
  • THTR 212 (TH) Costume History
  • THTR 217 (TH; W) Theatre History I
  • WGS 258 (TH) Women in the Arts

Interpreting Texts (IT)

Courses satisfying this requirement develop students' skills in analyzing and understanding textual representations of human experience. These criteria construe the notion of "text" broadly. The texts being analyzed might include literary works, films, music compositions, rituals, performances, or ethnographies. A text for these purposes is one that reveals its meaning to or intelligibly challenges a coherent practice of interpretation. Of course, a given text may do both. Furthermore, courses that satisfy this requirement should encourage students to consider the relationship between texts discussed and particular form/s of culture they may express or help constitute. In studying these texts and the process of their interpretation, students in these courses should:

  • consider the form " for example, the various styles or genres " of textual communication;
  • study various interpretive strategies and problems;
  • examine dynamic relations among author, reader and text;
  • explore whether " and if so, in what ways " texts embody cultural values.

The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet the Interpreting Texts requirement:

  • ANTH 211 (IT) Folklore
  • ARTH 271 (IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Greek Art and Architecture
  • CHNSE 331 (IT) Third Year Chinese I
  • CHNSE 332 (IT) Third Year Chinese II
  • CLAS 171 (IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Love and War, Gods and Heroes: Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
  • CLAS 244 (IT; W; 4th Sem Lang Req) The Greek and Roman Stage
  • CLAS 247 (IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Women in Roman Literature and Life
  • CLAS 260 (IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Gender and Sexuality in Greek Society
  • ENGL 116 (IT; W) Topics in American Literature
  • ENGL 117 (IT; W) Topics in British Literature
  • ENGL 118 (IT; W) Topics in World Literature
  • ENGL 119 (IT; W) The Forms of Literature: The Art of Reading Poetry, Drama, Fiction
  • ENGL 202 (IT; W) Introduction to Literary Theory
  • ENGL 253 (IT) Diversity in American Literature
  • ENGL 319 (IT) Literary Genre and Literary Interpretation
  • FREN 340 (IT) Introduction to French Literature
  • FREN 437 (IT) Female Voices in African Literature and Film
  • FREN 440 (IT) Quebecois Literature and Cinema
  • GERM 241 (IT) Topics in German Culture (in translation)
  • IDS 129 (IT) Mythology and Symbolism
  • IDS 210 (IT) Oral Tradition and Performance in African Literature
  • IDS 322 (IT) The Idea of Europe
  • JAPN 314 (IT; W) Japanese Literature in Translation
  • LAS 350 (IT; TH) Mesoamerican Civilizations
  • LATIN 353 (IT) Latin Sources on Roman Women
  • MUSC 142 (IT) The Conception of Death in Western Classical Music
  • MUSC 210 (IT) Music of America
  • MUSC 212 (IT) Jazz: America and Beyond
  • MUSC 462 (IT) History and Literature of Art Song
  • POLI 119 (IT) Colloquium: Politics and Popular Culture
  • POLI 120 (IT) Colloquium: Political Virtue: Good and Evil in Public Life
  • POLI 213 (W; IT) Writing Political Philosophy: Individuality and Community
  • POLI 311 (IT; W) Writing Political Humor
  • REL 114 (IT) Early Christian Literature
  • REL 116 (IT) Introduction to Major Religious Texts
  • REL 256 (IT) Gooddesses and Ghosts: Images of Women in Chinese Tradition [Crosslisted with WGS 256]
  • REL 352 (IT) Shamanism
  • REL 354 (IT) Topics in Asian Religions
  • REL 420 (IT) The Bible in American Tradition
  • RHET 210 (IT; AR; W) Media and the Environment
  • RHET 244 (IT; AR) Latino/Latina Voices in the U.S.
  • RUSS 150 (IT) Tolstoy's War and Peace
  • RUSS 235 (IT; 4th Sem Lang) Russian and Soviet Cinema
  • RUSS 320 (W; IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Introduction to Russian Literature in Translation
  • RUSS 325 (IT) Topics in Russian Literature
  • RUSS 345 (IT) From Russian With Love: Family and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature
  • SPAN 340 (IT) Introduction to Spanish Literature
  • SPAN 352 (IT) Peninsular Literature I: Medieval and Early Modern
  • SPAN 353 (IT) Peninsular Literature II: Modern and Contemporary
  • SPAN 355 (IT) Latin American Literature: Conquest to Modernismo
  • SPAN 356 (IT) Latin American Literature: Modernismo to the Present
  • THTR 219 (IT) Theatre History II
  • WGS 256 (IT) Goddesses and Ghosts: Images of Women in Chinese Tradition [Crosslisted with REL 256]

Understanding Society (US)

Courses satisfying this requirement develop students' understanding of social phenomena by analyzing and explaining human behavior and social institutions and practices. Students in these courses should:

  • recognize the dynamic interplay between human agency and social structure;
  • analyze the social processes that underlie or result in specific social institutions, events or outcomes;
  • develop models or theories to explain social phenomena and evaluate those through observation and the collection of data;
  • evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the methods and theories employed.

The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet the Understanding Society requirement:

  • ANTH 150 (US) Controversies and Issues in Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH 231 (US; TH) Native North American Cultures
  • ANTH 232 (US) Peoples and Cultures in Africa
  • ANTH 233 (US) Peoples and Cultures of Asia
  • ANTH 258 (US) Selected Area Studies
  • CHNSE 252 (US) Rites of Passage in Chinese Societies
  • CHNSE 258 (US) Gender and Mass Communication in China
  • CLAS 351 (US; 4th Sem Lang Req) Greek and Near Eastern Religion
  • ECON 122 (US) Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECON 123 (US) Principles of Macroeconomics
  • GREEK 351 (US) The Religious and Ritual Context of Aeschylus' Eumenides
  • IDS 230 (US) Rites of Passage in Japan and the United States
  • IDS 350 (US) The Sociology of Science
  • POLI 121 (US) Colloquium: Work, Labor, Class
  • POLI 210 (US) American Politics
  • POLI 214 (US) International Politics
  • POLI 216 (US) Politics of Advanced Industrial Societies
  • POLI 218 (US) Political Change in the Third World
  • POLI 382 (US) Capitalism and Democracy
  • PSYC 105 (US) Ecological Psychology
  • PSYC 354 (US) Psychology of Women and Gender
  • RHET 355 (US) Gender and Communication
  • SOC 114 (US) Race and Ethnic Relations
  • SOC 121 (US) Gender in Society
  • SOC 131 (US) Sociological Inquiry
  • SOC 132 (US, W) Sport and Society
  • SOC 134 (US) Crime, Delinquency and the Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 144 (US) Social Problems and Social Justice