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Willamette University

900 State Street
Salem, Oregon 97301

503-370-6300 voice

International Studies View this department's website

The International Studies major is offered through an interdisciplinary program which integrates social, economic, political, geographic, and historical perspectives in the examination of the dramatic trends toward increased interdependence among nations. It seeks to develop an awareness of the fact that many problems or issues which have been regarded as primarily domestic can no longer be understood or resolved without consideration of the global context. The program also aims to provide majors with a recognition of the importance of cultural diversity, through grounding in a specific foreign culture and language, as an essential complement to the international courses in the curriculum.

Students who major in International Studies have the opportunity to pursue a course of study that focuses on a particular aspect of global affairs. Examples of topical focuses might include (but are not limited to) subjects such as international economics and trade, international security, foreign aid and development issues, globalization, international cultural institutions, religion in world affairs, European history and politics, Latin American society, and Asian culture and religion. Each student, in consultation with his or her major advisor, prepares a unique course of study that integrates the various disciplinary perspectives in the major into an individually designed topical focus.

The International Studies major is prepared to enter graduate training in various fields of international relations and area specialization. Careers in international business and government are often sought as well as careers in teaching, journalism and related fields. The major is good preparation for entry into law school.

Requirements for the International Studies Major (11-11.5 Credits)

Core courses (4)

Courses with a foreign language prefix (3)

All majors are required to complete three credits with a foreign language prefix (in the same language). Required courses within each individual language group are as follows:

Chinese

  • CHNSE 331 (IT) Advanced Chinese: Reading the Media (1)
  • CHNSE 332 (IT) Advanced Chinese: Reading the Humanities (1) and
  • CHNSE 431 Reading in the Humanities (1) or
  • CHNSE 432 Introduction to Classical Chinese Texts and Thoughts (1)

French

  • FREN 331 French Composition and Discussion (1)
  • FREN 333 History of French Civilization (1)
  • FREN 430 Introduction to French Thought (1) or
  • FREN 436 Francophone Literature (1) or
  • FREN 437 Female Voices in African Literature and Film (1) or
  • FREN 440 Quebecois Literature and Cinema (1)

German

  • GERM 331 (W) German Composition and Discussion (1)
  • GERM 333 Contemporary German Culture (1)
  • Any other 300 or 400 level German course (must be taught in German)

Japanese

  • JAPN 201 (W) Modern Japanese Society and Culture (1)
  • JAPN 314 (IT; W; 4th Sem Lange Req) Japanese Literature in Translation (1)
  • JAPN 331 Third Year Japanese I (1)
  • JAPN 332 Third Year Japanese II (1)

Russian

Students will choose three courses from the following:

  • RUSS 235 (IT) Russian and Soviety Cinema (1) or
  • RUSS 242 (W) Great Short Stories from Russia (1) or
  • RUSS 320 (W; IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Introduction to Russian Literature in Translation (1) 
and two of the following courses:
  • RUSS 331 Russian Composition and Discussion (1)
  • RUSS 333 Russian Civilization and Culture (1)
  • RUSS 490 Reading and Conference (.5 or 1)

Spanish

  • SPAN 331 (W) Spanish Composition and Discussion (1)
  • SPAN 333 (TH) Hispanic Civilization or
  • SPAN 335 (TH) Cultural Institutions of Spain (1)
  • Any upper division Spanish course except SPAN 332

Topical Focus (4)

Each student is required to prepare a course of study that focuses on a particular aspect of global affairs. Examples of topical focuses might include (but are not limited to) subjects such as international economics and trade, international security, foreign aid and development issues, globalization, international cultural institutions, religion in world affairs, European history and politics, Latin American society, or Asian culture and religion. Each student's individual course of study is to be approved by the student's major advisor and Chair of the International Studies Program, and submitted to the Registrar's Office to track progress through the major. Substitute courses can be approved by student's major advisor and Chair of the International Studies Program in the following circumstances: if the courses chosen are not to be offered during the student's tenure at Willamette; if a course not listed here better fits the student's Topical Focus; or if the student attends a Willamette-approved overseas study program.

Students will choose courses from the following in formulating their topical focus (one course from History, one course from Politics, a maximum of three courses from the same department):

  • ANTH 232 (US) Peoples and Cultures of Africa (1)
  • ANTH 233 (US) Peoples and Cultures of Asia (1)
  • ANTH 355 Warfare, Violence, and Peace (1)
  • ARTH 113 (IT) Introduction to Chinese Art History (1)
  • ARTH 114 (IT) Introduction to Japanese Art History (1)
  • ASIA 201 Gateway to East Asia (1)
  • CHNSE 252 (US)Rites of Passage in Chinese Societies (1)
  • CHNSE 254 Language, Ethnicity and Folklore in China (1)
  • CHNSE 256 Chinese Folklore in Films (1)
  • CHNSE 258 (US) Gender and Mass Communication in China (1)
  • CHNSE 269 Chinese Society and Media (1)
  • ECON 351 Comparative Economic Systems (1)
  • ECON 352 The Economics of Developing Countries (1)
  • GERM 241 Topics in German Culture (1) (Taught in English)
  • HIST 116 (TH) Western Civilization Since 1650 (1)
  • HIST 118 East Asia Civilization Since 1800 (1)
  • HIST 131 (TH) Historical Inquiry: The French Revolution
  • HIST 254 20th-Century Europe (1)
  • HIST 256 Colonial Latin America (1)
  • HIST 258 (4th Sem Lang Req) Modern Latin America (1)
  • HIST 282 (TH) Twentieth-Century China: The Search for Modernity (1)
  • HIST 322 European Intellectual History: The 20th Century (1)
  • HIST 372 History of Modern Russia (1)
  • HIST 373 History of Modern France (1)
  • HIST 381 (TH) History of Modern Japan (1)
  • HIST 383 Mao's China 1949-1979 (1)
  • HIST 390 (W; 4th Sem Lang Req) Germany from Bismarck to Hitler (1)
  • HIST 391 (4th Sem Lang Req) Germany Since 1945 (1)
  • HIST 445 Postwar Japan (1)
  • JAPN 201 (W) Modern Japanese Society and Culture (1)
  • JAPN 240 Japanese Language and Culture (intercultural Communication) (1)
  • LAS 251 Latin American Cultures (1)
  • LAS 330 Landscapes and Cultures of South America (1)
  • LAS 331 Landscapes and Cultures of Middle America (1)
  • POLI 216 (US) Politics of Advanced Industrial Societies (1)
  • POLI 218 (US) Politics in the Developing World (1)
  • POLI 326 (W) Globalization and Equity (1)
  • POLI 362 Latin American Politics (1)
  • POLI 370 Europe and the International System (1)
  • POLI 372 American Foreign Policy (1)
  • POLI 373 International Security and Cooperation (1)
  • POLI 374 Asia and the International System (1)
  • POLI 376 Latin American Revolutions (1)
  • POLI 378 (W) Nations and the International System (1)
  • POLI 380 Asian Politics and Development (1)
  • POLI 386 Political Ecology (1)
  • POLI 387 Africa and the World (1)
  • REL 135 Religions of Asia (1)
  • REL 233 (TH) Religions Along the Silk Road (1)
  • REL 239 Introduction to Chinese Religions (1)
  • REL 262 Japanese Religions (1)
  • REL 334 (AR) Liberation Theology and Social Change (1)
  • REL 344 Topics in Contemporary European Theology (1)
  • REL 354 Topics in Asian Religions (1)
  • RHET 360 Rhetoric of War and Peace (1)
  • RUSS 233 (W; TH; 4th Sem Lang Req) Russian Culture: Russian Ways and Views of Russia (1)
  • RUSS 320 (W; IT; 4th Sem Lang Req) Introduction to Russian Literature in Translation (1)
  • RUSS 345 From Russia with Love: Family and Sexuality in the 20th-Century Russian Literature (1)
  • SOC 330 World Population Problems (1)

Indicators of Achievement

By the completion of the International Studies Program, student majors should achieve the following student learning outcomes (SLOs):

  • Knowledge of international / global issues: develop an understanding of international or global processes and conditions, and a particular depth of knowledge in a topical field of study determined by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor;
  • Familiarity / facility with a foreign / non-USA cultural perspective:  develop knowledge of a foreign (non-USA) language and culture and an ability to draw on that knowledge in critically analyzing issues of international or global significance;
  • Capacity for multi-disciplinary analysis: develop an ability to undertake critical analysis of issues of international or global significance that draws on more than one discipline (cultural studies, anthropology, environmental studies, history, economics, geography, and political science);

These learning outcomes have been previously been assessed primarily indirectly, through a self-reported survey of graduating seniors. The only direct assessment of student learning has occurred in the senior experience course, the Seminar in International Studies. The instructor for that course – which is the sole course conducted by the International Studies Program – grades student coursework, in which students research and write a thesis paper on a topic of their choosing. Future assessment under the new accreditation principles developed at Willamette will focus on the following goals:

Student Learning Outcomes for the International Studies Major

  1. Develop an understanding of international or global processes, and particular knowledge of a topical field
    • Students read widely about, follow, and be able to discuss topics of current international significance, with an ability to relate them to their cultural and historical contexts
    • Students attend or participate in co-curricular events that discuss international affairs (events or trends) and/or their cultural and historical contexts
    • Students formulate a research proposal for the senior seminar that draws on and integrates their topical focus electives and co-curricular experiences
  2. Develop familiarity with non-USA language & culture
    • Students can speak in a foreign language about cultural or social matters, and have an awareness of how international issues might be viewed from a perspective of cultures or societies other than the United States of America
    • Students formulate and execute a research proposal for the senior seminar that draws on their knowledge of a non-USA culture, or that considers issues of international or global significance from a perspective other than that of the United States
  3. Develop an ability to undertake interdisciplinary analysis of international affairs
    • Students can identify and discuss multiple dimensions of single international trends or problems, including some combination of the issue’s cultural, historical, political, economic, geographic or other disciplinary elements
    • Students formulate and carry out a research project that reflects a multi-disciplinary approach to such a problem

Faculty


Course Listings

INTST 499 (W) Seminar in International Studies (1)

Interdisciplinary examination of international issues with emphasis on global interdependence.

General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing centered

Prerequisite: Senior standing, completion of POLI 214, ERTH 230 and ECON 353

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff