2014-2015

History

The program in History is designed to provide a firm foundation in the histories of Western civilization, American society and culture, and East Asian and African cultures. The department is especially strong in social, cultural and intellectual history and emphasizes an understanding of the nature of historical inquiry, an exposure to the variety of historical interpretations and an ability to think historically, as this contributes to an understanding of human experience, personal self-awareness and global citizenship.

The breadth of history and its interrelatedness with other disciplines make the study of history a significant part of a liberal arts education. The ability to gather evidence that pertains to a problem, to analyze this material critically, and to present an interpretive argument about it cogently and succinctly is also valuable background for most professional careers. Willamette history majors gravitate to graduate study in the discipline, in law and in education, as well as to government service, business and the church. It is noteworthy that recent history majors have done very well in gaining admission to graduate schools in history and to graduate programs in law, business administration and theology.

Requirements for the History Major (9 Credits)

  • One credit in American History (1)
  • One credit in European History (1)
  • One credit in East Asian or Latin American History or African History (1)
  • Five additional credits in History (5)
  • HIST 499W Senior Tutorial or
  • HUM 497W Humanities Senior Seminar (1) [Crosslisted with CLHI 497W]

The major consists of 9 credits, including not more than five lower-division credits of which a maximum of three may be at the 100 level. Remaining credits must be at the 300 and 400 levels. One credit is required in each of the three areas of American, European, and East Asian or Latin American or African history. Students, by the end of the sophomore year and in consultation with a department advisor, will choose an area of concentration (e.g., a thematic, periodic or geographic focus, an intellectual, social or comparative emphasis) consisting of a minimum of three credits at the 200 level and above, plus the Senior Experience (HIST 499W or HUM 497W). The department encourages all majors to study a language related to their area of emphasis.

HUM 497W and CLHI 497W may not fulfill the requirement for the Senior Experience if it has already been used to do so in another major.

Requirements for the History Minor (5 Credits)

No more than 2 of these credits may be at the 100 level.

Students must take courses in at least 2 of the following 3 areas

  • European history
  • American history
  • East Asian or Latin American or African history

Students must select a 3-credit area of concentration in one of the following

  • European history
  • American history
  • East Asian or African history

Indicators of Achievement

Student Learning Outcomes for the History Major

  1. A working knowledge of several different historical eras and locales
  2. The ability to make interpretive sense out of a large body of historical data
  3. The ability to articulate a clear and original historical interpretation in both written and oral form
  4. The ability to identify multiple positions within a historiographical debate and assess the strengths and weaknesses of those positions
  5. The ability to usefully apply their historical understanding to themselves and the time in which they live

Faculty

  • Cecily McCaffrey, Associate Professor of History; Department Chair
  • Wendy Petersen Boring, Associate Professor of History
  • Robert Chenault, Associate Professor of History/Classics
  • Seth Cotlar, Professor of History
  • William Duvall, E. J. Whipple Professor of History
  • Ellen Eisenberg, Dwight & Margaret Lear Professor of American History
  • Ronald Loftus, Professor of History
  • Bianca Murillo, Assistant Professor of History; On Research Leave Fall 2013- Spring 2014
  • William T. Smaldone, Professor of History

Part-Time and Visiting Faculty

  • Leslie Dunlap
  • Jennifer Jopp

Course Listings

HIST 113 (TH) Topics in United States History: Early Period (1)

Development of American political institutions and the impact of major issues on American society and culture from the Revolutionary era through the Civil War.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Jopp, Cotlar

HIST 114 (TH) Topics in United States History: Later Period (1)

Development of the modern American state and the impact of major issues on American society and culture from Reconstruction to the present.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 115 (TH) Western Civilization to 1650 (1)

A survey of the cultural, intellectual, political and socioeconomic developments of Western society. It examines ancient Near Eastern, Greek and Roman societies, the rise of Christianity, the Medieval period, the Renaissance and Reformation and the Age of Absolutism. Among the fundamental aims of the course is to identify the defining characteristics of different phases of Western historical development and to study the factors that precipitate long- and short-term historical change. The course is very broad in scope and seeks to provide students with a sense of how Western ideas, social relations and institutions have changed over time and how these changes are interrelated. It also aims to acquaint students with different approaches to historical inquiry.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Duvall, Smaldone

HIST 116 (TH) Western Civilization since 1650 (1)

A survey of the cultural, intellectual, political and socioeconomic developments of modern Western society, including the scientific revolution of the 17th Century, the Enlightenment, the age of democratic revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of nation-states, totalitarianism, two world wars, the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet system. Among the fundamental aims of the course is to identify the defining characteristics of different phases of Western historical development and to study the factors that precipitate long- and short-term historical change. The course is very broad in scope and seeks to provide students with a sense of how Western ideas, social relations and institutions have changed over time and how these changes are interrelated.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Duvall, Smaldone

HIST 118 (TH) East Asian Civilization Since 1800 (1)

An introduction to the histories of China, Korea and Japan from the early 19th century to the present. This course will examine the experience of East Asian civilizations in their encounters with the West and the problems of modernization which followed. Despite their geographic proximity, China, Korea and Japan followed different patterns during much of their history and this course will seek to examine those patterns, with an explicitly comparative approach, in the intellectual, socioeconomic and institutional realms. Readings emphasize literature and historical documents in translation.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: McCaffrey

HIST 119 (TH) Introduction to Modern African History (1800-present) (1)

This course provides an introduction to African history since the early nineteenth century. Instead of presenting a comprehensive survey, covering every region of the continent, this course takes a topical approach by focusing on key themes and issues crucial to understanding of Modern Africa. Themes include sources of African history; power and identities in pre-colonial states; Africa's connection to regional and world economies; slavery and the slave trade; explorers, missionaries, settlers, and other cross-cultural encounters; European conquest and resistance; gender relations; Pan-Africanism, nationalism, and struggles for independence; the politics of development and post-colonialism; recent crises and contemporary African realities.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Murillo

HIST 131 (TH) Historical Inquiry (1)

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of historical inquiry. Through the exploration of a specifically defined topic, the course will examine primary documents, issues of change and continuity in time, theories of causation, historical interpretation and argument, and the importance of historical thinking for human experience in the world.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Prerequisite: Freshmen and Sophomores only. May be repeated for credit one time if the topic is different.
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 221W History Workshop (1)

This course introduces the student to the methodologies employed in the discipline of history. Particular attention is given to historical research process, the use of evidence, and the skills in historical writing. Designed to focus on discrete historical topics, the course also functions to introduce students to historical discourse and the ethical concerns of the historian.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: One HIST course or consent; no seniors
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 231 (TH) Greek History From Homer to Alexander (1)

This course provides an introduction to the history of ancient Greece, spanning a thousand years from the Bronze Age down to the time of Alexander the Great. Topics to be discussed include the interactions between Greece and other ancient civilizations, the origins and development of Greek city-states (especially Athens and Sparta), and the development of local and panhellenic identities. Within this historical framework, close attention will be given not only to political institutions but also to the social and cultural values that shaped them. Students will read a variety of ancient texts in translation, along with some modern scholarship; the emphasis will be on learning how to make critical use of sources to discuss and debate historical questions.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Chenault

HIST 233 (TH) Asian Empires on the Silk Road (1)

This course explores the history of Asian empires on the Silk Road such as the Tang dynasty and the Mongol empire. It focuses in particular on intercultural communication and exchange, considering the interactions between societies ranging from the Japanese islands to the steppes of Central Asia. Attention will be paid to significant religious and cultural developments shaping the history of the region, such as the expansion of Buddhism and the spread of a character-based writing system, as well as the evolution of relations between Asia kingdoms and their neighbors.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: McCaffrey

HIST 251 (TH) Rome: From Republic to Empire (1)

This course provides an introduction to the history of ancient Rome, spanning the more than one thousand years from the founding of the city through the late  imperial period. The class is structured around a series of problems and questions that will require you to formulate and evaluate historical arguments based on the close reading of ancient sources. Topics to be covered include the origins of Rome, it's growth from a small city-state to a world empire, and the relationship between this expansion and the development of both the Republic and the empire as political systems. We will also consider the impact of Roman rule on the populations of Rome and its provinces as well as selected aspects of Roman society and culture, including the household, the role of public entertainment, and the varieties of religious experience found within the Empire.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Chenault

HIST 254 (TH) 20th-Century Europe (1)

This course surveys the history of Europe in the 20th century. Focusing on social and political developments, it examines the phenomenon of nationalism, total war, the Russian Revolution, the Depression, the rise of fascism and bureaucratic collectivism, and the Holocaust. In the post-WWII period, the course will focus on the division of Europe and of Europe in the Cold War, the decline of the European empires and on the contradictory forces that are pushing Europe toward economic and political unity on the one hand (most markedly in the West) and toward dissolution and conflict (especially in the East).

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 255 (TH) Cities and the Making of Modern Europe: 1750 to Present (1)

This course surveys the transformation of Europe from a primarily rural to an overwhelmingly urban society. Why have cities come to dominate the European landscape? How have the functions of cities changed over time? How has the growth of cities impacted people's quality of life and how have cities managed the environmental, social, economic, and cultural challenges that expansion brought? What kinds of struggles played out in cities? To what extent are cities engines of change in shaping modern European society? The course will grapple with such questions by studying the histories of a selection of cities across Europe from the onset of the industrial revolution to the present.

  • General Education Requirement:  Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 256 (TH) Colonial Latin America (1)

A study of the history of Latin America from the pre-colonial period to independence. Emphasis will be placed on the development of Latin America's economy, culture and political life. Special attention will be given to the encounter between the Spanish conquistadors and indigenous peoples, as well as to the background of the movements for independence.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Jopp

HIST 258 Modern Latin America (1)

This course examines the significant social, political, economic and cultural developments in Latin America from the 19th century movements for independence through the 20th century. Special emphasis will be given to Mexico, Cuba, and Central America as well as selected South American states including Brazil. The role of the United States in the region will also receive much attention.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 259 American Jewish History (1)

Since 1654, Jews have been a minority presence in America. This course surveys the Jewish experience from the colonial period through the late 20th century and places that experience in the larger context of American ethnic history. The various forms of Jewish identity--ethnic, cultural, religious, etc.--will be examined as they changed over time in response to experiences in America and in the larger Jewish world. Attention will be given to the impact of the successive waves of Jewish immigration on the American Jewish community, to regional variations in American Jewish experiences, and to the relationships between American Jewish communities and other ethnic/religious/racial minority communities, including recent debates over the evolving place of Jews in the American ethnic/racial hierarchy, often cast as the relationship of Jews to "whiteness."

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 262 American Women's History (1)

This class will present an overview of the history of women in the United States. The course will explore the shifting nature of gender systems, focusing on the following topics: the nature of women's work, sexuality and reproduction, education, social reform and feminism. The course will emphasize the diversity of American women's lives in terms of class, ethnic, racial and regional background.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Dunlap

HIST 265 (TH) Late Imperial China (1)

This course examines the social and cultural history of China during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). Topics include the political structures of imperial rule; the social and cultural institutions that organized local society; the economic trends that produced the pre-modern world's largest and most advanced civilization; and the ways in which all of the above were transformed by China's 19th-century encounter with Western imperialism. This period provides an excellent case study of nationalism and modernization in a non-Western context.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: McCaffrey

HIST 273 Africa Since 1945 (1)

This course focuses on key figures, events, and trends in African history during the second half of the twentieth-century. It bridges the gap between colonial and post-colonial history by examining key features of British, French, and Portuguese colonialism, as well as their post-colonial legacies in politics, economics, culture, religion, and the arts. Topics include: colonial economies and labor relations, nationalist ideologies and independence movements, military regimes and one-party states, and structural adjustment and neoliberal reform.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Murillo

HIST 282 (TH) China in Revolution, 1911-1949 (1)

This course focuses on the tumultuous years between 1911-1949, when China developed into a modern nation-state. Topics include: the political struggles behind the formation of the Republic of China; the intellectual and cultural revolutions of the May Fourth period; the development of an industrial economy; the rise of the Chinese Communist Party; the War of Resistance and civil war.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically; Asia Cluster
  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: McCaffrey

HIST 301W Themes in American Social History (1)

A study of the major themes in American social history. The methods and central debates of this movement to study history "from the bottom up" will be analyzed. Topics include mobility, the work and residential patterns of African-Americans and immigrants and poverty.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 302 Foundations of American Thought (1)

A study of the changing climate of opinion and representative intellectuals from the colonial period to the 20th century. Emphasis will be placed on Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism and the development of Pragmatism.

  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 303 History of American Families (1)

This seminar in social history explores how families in the United States have changed over the past four centuries in relation to broad social, economic, and political changes. The course examines changing household arrangements as well as changing conceptions of proper family life, emphasizing how race, class, gender, and sexuality have shaped relations between family members over time. Topics include the history of courtship; the history of state regulation of marriage and divorce; the history of parenthood and childhood; and the impact of social movements such as feminism and Christian conservatism on families.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Dunlap

HIST 306 History Through Biography (1)

The aim of this course is to study the life of a major historical figure. Through the use of biographical and autobiographical works, students will examine the subject's life, the historical context in which the person lived, and his or her historical significance. In addition to these aims, the course will also survey a range of biographical approaches.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 307 American Immigration History (1)

This course will explore the major themes and debates in American immigration history. Topics will include key migration waves, immigration policy, acculturation and attitudes towards immigrants, with an emphasis on the post-Civil War period. Methodological issues in researching immigrant history will also be explored.

  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Designated as a Service Learning Course
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 308 American Legal History (1)

A study of the history of American law from its origins in the colonial period to its contemporary condition. This course will use the law that we study as a window on the economic, political and social forces that mold law and examine the role of law in American society. The ultimate objective is to come to some conclusions about the relationship between ourselves and our legal system.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Jopp

HIST 312 The Early American Republic, 1790 - 1840 (1)

This course examines the social, political, and economic transformations that marked the first fifty years of the new American nation. These years witnessed the emergence of the nation's first formal political parties and a radical democratization of the political system, early industrialization and the rise of wage labor in the North, the expansion and solidification of slavery in the South, the hardening of racial and gender ideologies throughout the nation, and an explosion of reform movements in response to these dramatic new developments. Students will engage with a wide range of primary and secondary sources in order to come to their own understandings of this formative period in American history.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 315 (TH) Western Civilization and Sustainability: Beginnings to 1600 (1)

This course is an introduction to the historical roots of sustainability design to examine the thought and practices which have marked interactions between humans and the environment in the West prior to 1600. Focusing on key moments that have contributed significantly to the current context--the transition to agriculture, classical Athens, the later middle ages, and the age of global commerce, colonization, and scientific progress--the course will analyze 'green' versus traditional histories, interpret data about resource use, and analyze primary texts that speak to the human-nature relationship. The course will challenge students to analyze the extent to which our current thought and practices have roots in the historical past, understand humans' relationship to the environment as integral to the narrative of history in the West, analyze traditional historical categories such as periodization, causation, and narrative structure, and use the lens of sustainability to examine how values shape historical narratives.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment:  Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Petersen-Boring

HIST 319 Medieval Europe, 400-1500 (1)

This course will examine the Barbarian invasions of Europe, the decline of the Roman Empire, the rise of Christianity and its new moral norms, institutions, and hierarchies, the Frankish Empire, and the threats of Byzantine, Moslem and Viking civilizations. Then it will trace, from the 11th through 14th centuries, the revival of economic and urban life, the Investiture Controversy, the 12th century Renaissance, the crusades, the rise of the feudal monarchies, Scholasticism, Gothic Art and Architecture and the increasing secularization of western Europe.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Petersen

HIST 320 European Intellectual History: The Enlightenment (1)

Major trends in European thought during the 17th and 18th centuries, particularly the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and the rise of Romanticism. Not available to freshmen.

  • Offering: Every third semester
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 321 European Intellectual History: The 19th-Century (1)

Major trends in European thought from Hegel to Nietzsche and Freud, including Marxism, Liberalism and Positivism and its rejection. Not available to freshmen.

  • Offering: Every third semester
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 322 European Intellectual History: The 20th-Century (1)

Major trends in European thought from Nietzsche, Freud and Wittgenstein to the present, including phenomenology, relativism, existentialism and postmodern discourse. Not available to freshmen.

  • Offering: Every third semester
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 341 Studies in Latin American History: (1)

Topics to be announced. A thematic, general interest course in Latin American history offered when circumstances warrant. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Prerequisite: One History course or consent of instructor
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 342 Studies in American History: (1)

Topics to be announced. A thematic, general course in American history offered when circumstances warrant. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Prerequisite: One History course or consent of instructor
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 343 Studies in European History: (1)

A thematic, general interest course in European history offered when circumstances warrant. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Prerequisite: One History course or consent of instructor
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 344W Studies in East Asian History: (1)

Topic to be announced. A thematic, general interest course in East Asian history offered when circumstances warrant. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Prerequisite: One History course or consent of instructor
  • General Education Requirement:  Writing-centered
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 345 Studies in Greek or Roman History (1)

Topic to be announced. A thematic, general interest course in ancient Greek or Roman history. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Prerequisite: One History course or consent of instructor.
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Chenault

HIST 360W Expressive Cultures in African History (1)

This course uses African expressive forms such as music, fashion, sport, theatre, and art as a lens to understanding larger historical transformations--colonialism, urbanization, and independence--in twentieth century Africa. Organized thematically, the course will concentrate on three major themes: African expressive cultures as (1) sources of empowerment and resistance; (2) sites of consciousness producing new kinds of self and collectivity; and (3) expressions of older values and beliefs, as well as newer cultural forms. In addition, we will explore the lives of particular African artists, musicians, and actors and focus on how these individuals have reflected larger political, economic, and social changes over the past 100 years. Not only will this course enrich students' understanding of how Africans carve out for themselves time for pleasure and enjoyment, but also demonstrate how such creative practices reflect African understanding of their own history.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Murillo

HIST 361 African American History 1619-1865 (1)

This course examines the experience of African Americans in the United States from 1619 to the end of the Civil War. Course topics will include the Atlantic Slave Trade, the relationship between slavery and racism, the development of free black communities in the North and South, slave religion, patterns of slave resistance and accommodation, the emergence of a shared African-American culture in the 18th century, and the African-American role in both the abolitionist movement and the Civil War.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 362 African American History 1865-Present (1)

This course examines the experience of African Americans in the United States from Reconstruction to the present. Course topics will include Reconstruction, the Jim Crow period, the Great Migration, the urban experience, the Civil Rights Movement, and African American leadership.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 367 The American Revolution (1)

This course examines the causes and consequences of the American Revolution. Course materials explore the events of 1763 to 1789 from many different perspectives-as a set of diplomatic and military encounters which fractured a long-standing colonial relationship, as a pivotal moment in the history of Anglo-American political thought, as part of the expansion of a market-oriented economy in North America, and as a socially transformative event in the lives of the laboring men, women, African-Americans, and Native Americans who took part in the war. Students will engage with a wide range of primary and secondary sources which will enable them to assess in what ways the American War for Independence was or was not a revoluntionary war.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Cotlar

HIST 372 History of Modern Russia (1)

The uniqueness of Russian civilization, the Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union. The emancipation period, revolutionary thought and action, the constitutional monarchy, the 1917 revolutions and the establishment of the Soviet regime, the development of agriculture and industry and the evolution of the Communist Party.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 373 History of Modern France (1)

From the Revolution of 1789 to the present, considering the revolutionary tradition and its impact, and the difficulties of France culturally, socially and economically in making the adjustment to the 20th century.

  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Duvall

HIST 374 (IT) Love and Reason in the Middle Ages: European Intellectual History 400-1500 (1)

This course introduces students to the intellectual culture of the Middle Ages through engagement with major texts and authors from the period (ca. 400-1500) including Boethius, Abelard, Aquinas, Maimonides, Chretien de Troyes, Marie de France, Mechtild de Magdburg, the Gawain poet, et Meun and de Lorris, Dante, and Christine de Pisan. Drawing on a diversity of genres, including philosophical treaties, poetry, literature, romances, confessions, short stories, and mystical journeys, the course will explore medieval articulations of the ultimate good, the relationship between reason and passion, and the nature of knowledge and love.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Interpreting Texts
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Boring

HIST 375 Women and Gender in Medieval Europe (1)

This course will explore the history of women in the European Middle Ages and examine the ways in which European medieval culture represented and constructed gender through its institutions, cultural symbols, and literary texts. The course will focus on primary texts by and about women, including devotional and courtly literature poetry, philosophy, hagiography, and essays. Through these readings we will explore topics such as how medieval people viewed the physical body and constructed the social bodies of women and men; the way in which the realities of women's daily lives shaped cultural representations of the female; how representations of sexuality and desire, new conceptions of reason and nature, and new forms of women's religious life shaped the religious and secular literature of the period; and how court culture, crusades, and inquisition practices contributed to medieval constructions of male and female identities.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Boring

HIST 377 (TH) Chinese Microcosms (1)

Chinese Microcosms will take a multi-disciplinary approach to examining Chinese traditional ideas about the structure of the universe and how these cosmological concepts are reflected in important sites from the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. These sites are referred to as microcosms, or reflections of the structure of the universe in miniature. After a strong grounding in Chinese traditional cosmological models, this course will focus on understanding key examples of microcosms within their imperial ritual sites in Beijing, and the Tibetan Buddhist temple complexes in Beijing and at the Qing imperial summer retreat at Chengde, Hebei province.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Greenwood

HIST 379 Studies in Comparative History (1)

Topics will be announced. A thematic, general interest course in comparative history offered when circumstances warrant. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 381 (TH) History of Modern Japan (1)

This course examines the history of modern Japan from the late Tokugawa period (1800) through the Meiji Restoration (1868) and Japan's first industrial revolution, the rise of militarism and the road to Pearl Harbor, and Japan's remarkable growth and development in the postwar era. The emphasis will be on coming to terms with the nature and process of change in Japan's modern historical experience.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Alternate years in fall
  • Instructor: Loftus

HIST 383 Mao's China 1949-1979 (1)

Examination of the major events which took place during Mao's era, 1949-1976, and political and economic reforms during Deng Xiaoping's era. The issues will be focused on the structure of the CCP, its ideology, its left-oriented policies, its foreign policies and the power struggles within the leadership. Assessment of the role of Mao Zedong will provide a basis for understanding Chinese politics and society.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: McCaffrey

HIST 390W (4th Sem Lang Req) Germany from Bismarck to Hitler (1)

This course surveys the making of modern Germany from the creation of the Hohenzollern Empire under Bismarck until the collapse of the Third Reich in 1945. It examines the key social, economic, cultural, and political developments that led to the Empire's collapse at the end of the First World War, the founding of the Weimar Republic, and the rise and fall of Nazism.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Fourth Semester Language Requirement
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 391 (4th Sem Lang Req) Germany Since 1945 (1)

This course surveys the socioeconomic, political and cultural development of Germany since the collapse of the Third Reich. It examines the postwar division of the country into West and East Germany, the impact of the Cold War on two frontline states and the internal and external factors that led to the country's recent "reunification." In addition, the course aims to raise questions about the essential features of the "democratic-capitalist" West and the "totalitarian-socialist" East and the ways in which these factors shape contemporary German society.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Fourth Semester Language Requirement
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 393 Oral History: Theory, Methods, Practice (1)

This course is an introduction to the theory, methods, and practice of oral history. Students will explore how scholars have used oral history to reconstruct the experiences of individuals, groups, and communities. Course themes include controversial debates and objectives of oral history; insider/outsider status and other methodological challenges; oral history as advocacy and empowerment; interpreting oral source material; historical memory and the politics of remembering; life histories; and oral narratives and performance. Students will design, conduct, present their own oral history projects.

  • Prerequisites: Juniors of Senior Status, or consent of instructor.
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Murillo

HIST 440W (TH) History of Modern Socialism (1)

A study of the socialist responses to the industrialization of Europe and to the development of modern society. The study will begin with utopian socialists and then special emphasis will be given to Marxism. Consideration will also be given to the relationship of revisionist socialist, Leninist, Stalinist and Maoist thought to orthodox Marxism.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Thinking Historically
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Smaldone

HIST 441 Advanced Topics in Latin American History: (1)

A special topics course to be offered when circumstances warrant, focusing on a particular problem or issue in Latin American history in accordance with the faculty member's special interest and area of expertise. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Prerequisite: One History course or consent of instructor
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 442W The Holocaust (1)

This course examines the Holocaust as a central issue in modern history. The origins of the Holocaust, the implementation of the Final Solution, resistance to the Nazis and the legacy of the Holocaust will be studied from the perspective of both German and Jewish history.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Eisenberg, Smaldone

HIST 443 Advanced Topics in European History: (1)

A special topics course to be offered when circumstances warrant, focusing on a particular problem or issue in modern European history in accordance with the faculty member's special interest and area of expertise. May be repeated if the topic varies.

  • Prerequisite: One History course or consent of instructor
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 444W Seminar in Historiography and Philosophy of History (1)

Major trends, assumptions and problems in the writing of European and American history as related to the changing intellectual milieu from the Enlightenment to the present.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 445 Postwar Japan (1)

This course will examine Japan's historical experience since the end of World War II. How did the Allied occupation shape the development of contemporary Japan? How has Japan evolved since the end of the occupation into a modern economic superpower? How is modern Japan governed and how do modern Japanese define themselves in terms of their own culture and in relation to the rest of the world? Using novels and films along with a variety of other readings, this course will explore these and other questions, which will help us understand how contemporary Japan sees itself and its relationship to the modern world.

  • Prerequisite: HIST 118, HIST 381 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Alternate years in spring
  • Instructor: Loftus

HIST 450 Advanced Topics in American History (1)

Special topics course to be offered when circumstances warrant, focusing on a particular problem, issue or theme in American history in accordance with faculty interest and expertise.

  • Prerequisite: Two courses in American history
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 452W Topics in Chinese/Japanese History (1)

A special topics course to be offered when circumstances warrant, focusing on a particular problem or issue in either Chinese or Japanese history in accordance with the faculty member's special interest and area of expertise.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: Closed to first-year students.
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 453W History in the Archives (1)

This course aims to build students' skills as social historians through the development of archive-based projects focusing on Salem/Oregon. Students will explore issues in the practice of local history, be introduced to key historical themes and resources, and develop individual research questions. Students will form a research community as they explore their topics using archival sources. Each student will produce a paper that features critical analysis of archival sources and places his/her research in the context of existing scholarship. Findings will be shared in written and oral form with local historical institutions, such as the Willamette Heritage center. Although this course is open to other students, senior history majors may use this project to fulfill their senior experience requirement.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: One history course or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Eisenberg

HIST 491 Independent Study in American History (.5 or 1)

Directed reading and/or research in some aspect of American history for advanced students. Open only to juniors or seniors who have completed two credits in American history.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 492 Readings in European History (1)

Intensive individual reading in the field of modern European history, offering interested students the opportunity to probe beyond the advanced survey level of HIST 320, 321 and 322.

  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Staff

HIST 499W Senior Tutorial (1)

The History Senior Tutorial consists of a program of directed reading, research and writing in an area or topic of the student's own choice, in consultation with members of the department. As the tutorial is the culmination of the student's History major, it is expected that the tutorial topic will be from the student's area of concentration within the major and will build on course work completed by the student in that area. The tutorial project may be a research project involving the use of primary and secondary source materials, or a project that is a historiographical in nature.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: History major, senior standing
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

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