2014-2015

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Three Writing-Centered Credits

All entering students become part of the writing culture at Willamette through a series of writing-centered credits taken throughout their college careers. The program, which was initiated in 1995-96, has two central goals: the use of writing to develop understanding of course content across the disciplines, and the progressive development of fluency in writing for a variety of audiences, both general and disciplinary.

The Writing Center, housed in the Learning Commons in Ford Hall, supports the program by providing opportunities for students at all levels to confer individually with faculty and peer consultants about their writing.

For single majors, additional courses will include a writing-centered credit in the major, a writing-centered credit outside the major, and a writing-centered credit in any field (inside or outside the major). At least one of these credits must be an upper-division course at the 300 or 400 level. For double majors, additional courses will include a writing-centered credit in the first major, a writing-centered credit in the second major, and a writing-centered credit in any field (inside or outside the major). At least one of these credits must be an upper-division course at the 300 or 400 level.

Most transfer students will be required to take three writing-centered credits, as described above, provided the student has taken the equivalent of one credit of a course similar to our writing-centered course offerings. A transfer student who has had no equivalent course will be required to take four writing-centered credits.

Students transferring in as juniors may request transfer credit for a writing-centered credit by submitting a petition. This option will be extended to junior transfers during the admission process. Petition forms are available in the Registrar's Office, or on the Writing Center website. The deadline for exercising this option will be the end of their first semester at Willamette. Junior transfer students whose petitions are granted will be required to take two writing-centered credits, one in their major and one upper-division course outside of their major.

Students in these courses should:

  • Respond appropriately to the topic
  • Advance thesis and sustain focus
  • Provide appropriate evidence
  • Organize material effectively
  • Use appropriate style and mechanics


Writing-centered credits to be offered each semester will be designated by a W in the Schedule of Classes, and students must pass three of these with a grade of C- or higher in order to complete the Writing Program. The following courses are currently approved by the faculty to meet writing program requirements:

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