Registrar's Office

New or Changed Courses - Fall

THE FOLLOWING ARE DESCRIPTIONS FOR FALL 2012 COURSES THAT ARE NEW OR CHANGED SINCE THE LATEST VERSION OF THE PRINTED CATALOG, OR THAT ARE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING;

New Course

CCM 101: Public Speaking
Communicating effectively to a public audience, with an emphasis on speech.  Course covers development of arguments, consideration of audience and situation, organization of material, and multimodal presentation including the effective use of visual technologies with oral communication.  (RHET 150)

CCM 102: Argumentation, Advocacy, and Debate
The basic structure of argumentation and advocacy are examined with a view toward being able to participate in debate and other public advocacy events.  Topics for debate will be chosen from among those being depated in the public sphere.
Each student will be required to paricipate in a minimum of six debates in order to complete the course.  (Previously RHET 140)

CCM 201: Arguing About the Right Thing to Do
This course investigates methods of arguing about ethics.  First, students will be introduced to the general question of whether matters of right and wrong are susceptible to argument.  Are questions of right and wrong merely personal
choices or do argumentative methods exist to distinguish right from wrong?  Second, students will be introduced to various methods of arguing about ethical matters.  Finally, these methods of argument will be applied to several examples of
ethical questions prevelant in civic society, especially those including life and death, personal liberty, personal responsibility, and ethical rethoric.  The course also requires that students make presentations about ethical matters. (Previously RHET 229)

CCM 221: Rhetorical Theory
Rhetorical Theory introduces key theoretical questions from the rhetorical tradition that continue to influence conversations about public discourse and media today.  Prepares students to understand a variety of answers to these
questions, to begin developing arguments in response to them, and to defend their views against common objections.  Provides training in theoretical methods necessary for advanced coursework.  (Previously RHET 326)

CCM 220W: Analysis of Public Discourse (Kimokeo-Goes; Staff)
A writing-centered course focusing on criteria for and approaches to the analysis of public discourse. Critical forms such as the analysis of situation, argument, structure, style, power and media will be explored through case studies. Provides training in methods of analysis necessary for advanced coursework, including forms of rhetorical criticism.
Previously Rhetorical Criticism (Rhet 261W)

CCM 242:  US Public Discourse in the Broadcast
Critical and historical examination of communication practices and media through which residents participated in public discourse, particularly to shape US identity and the meaning of citizenship, as well as to define and address national controversies.  Surveys the period in which broadcast media (primarily radio and television) governed US rhetoric; attends to the rhetorical features of selected examples of oral,
print, and broadcast media.

CCM 260W: Media and the Enviroment
This course explores the way the media deals with environmental issues and images, particularly biodiversity. We focus on the emergence of the environment as an important media issue beginning in the 1970s; the way news and entertainment
media have presented the environment; and the links between media texts, the culture which they create and reflect and the viewer/reader's response to these messages. Students will learn textual analysis of news stories (print and
television), documentary films, and environment and children's programming. We pay particular attention to how these messages reflect the way the culture values and reasons and to how these messages argue for a particular view of the
natural world and our relationship with the environment.  (Previously RHET 210W)

CCM 261: Persuasion and Mass Media
Political rhetoric and advertising serve as case studies for the use and influence of persuasion in contemporary society.  Special attention is paid to the role of the mass media in this process and to the ethics of persuasive
techniques. (Previously RHET 232)

CCM 341: US Women's Rights Activism Before 1920
This course examines rhetorical practices through which advocates of equality cultivated political agency among disenfranchised Americans, developed a powerful movement for social change, and challenged norms that excluded women from the public sphere.  (Previously RHET 336)

CCM 343 Controversies in Northwest Public Discourse: Rhetorics of the Western Frontier (Kimokeo-Goes)
This course examines the frontier myth and its various uses, with special attention given to the Pacific Northwest. In addition to analyzing a variety of media that through which the frontier myth developed and circulates—including speeches, written texts, visual artifacts and film—students examine controversies related to values such as expansion, rugged individualism, masculinity and manifest destiny. Through exploration of these significant controversies, the course engages theories of communication related to public memory, visual rhetoric, feminism and post colonial studies. 
 
CCM 360-01 Topics in Public Discourse: Freedom of Speech (Bost)
This course deals with the history of freedom of speech.  Beginning with the roots of free speech in classical Greece, we will explore speech and expression as legal concepts (especially in US Supreme Court case law) as well as appeals to free speech and expression by a number of 19th, 20th and 21st-century social movements.  Along the way, we will deal with questions of the relationship between free speech and democracy, the relationship between “speech” and non-linguistic forms of political expression (from visual rhetoric to protests to political violence), the ethics of free speech, the relationship between political speech and identity (especially gender, race and class identity) and the effects of corporate speech and digital media on contemporary freedoms of expression  (Previously RHET 350)
 
CCM 394:  Internship
This course is offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors majoring in Civic Communication and Media.  The instructor will work with students to help acquire internships in the Salem/Portland are and oversee the internship as it progresses
throughout the semester.  A variety of internship placements will be pursued including those in the non-profit, political and corporate sectors.  Internships will focus on communication activities such as audience research, message development and outreach tactics. Students will be asked to complete short assignements throughout the internship, as well as turn in a final synopsis paper.  Interested students should contact the instructor the semester prior to their internship in order to secure a worthwhile position.  (Previously RHET 494)
 
CCM 496W:  Seminar in Civic and communication and Media
Students will complete and present a major project that contributes to ongoing scholarly conversation regarding communication and mediea practices that foster civic engagement.  Completion of the seminar, the career roadmap, and the comprehensive examination, will constitute the Senior Year Experience.
 
Hist 221W-01, History Workshop: Slave Narratives  (Cotlar)
This course is organized around two central questions.  One is methodological, “how can we recover the experiences and hear the voices of enslaved people from nineteenth century America?”  The second question is more empirical, “What do those voices tell us about the history of race and slavery in America?” This class starts from the assumption that no one was better situated to answer the question “what was slavery?” than enslaved people themselves.  The challenge then, is to figure out how we can use the very partial historical record left behind to try to reconstruct the world-views, experiences, and aspirations of the tens of millions of African-Americans who experienced enslavement in the years between the American Revolution and the Civil War. At the end of the course, each student will produce a 10-15 page essay based upon extensive, original research.

Course Change

Hist 235-01 (TH), Ancient Near East  (Braun)
This course explores the development of the Ancient Near East from the origins of civilization until Alexander the Great’s conquest of the region in the 330s B.C. The primary focus of the course rests on Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Palestine but Hittite, Minoan, and Mycenaean cultures will also be considered.

Hist 320-01, European Intellectual History: The Enlightenment  (Duvall)
This course focuses on European thought in the 17th and 18th centuries.  Were you to read a description of the period in a standard western civilization textbook, you might well confront the 18th century Enlightenment as a story of the heroic struggle of human reason (grounded in the 17th century Scientific Revolution) to bring progress toward freedom in human society (culminating in the Age of Democratic Revolutions).  That is, you would read the outlines of the dominant story western culture has told itself about itself, the grand narrative of modernity.  Our task is to examine the nature of an intellectual "climate" we will label the Enlightenment and to discern whether it is reducible to this single, relatively clear narrative.  In pursuing this task, we will read, analyze, discuss and write about texts written by some of the most significant thinkers of the period, and we will see if our reading of these "great books" problematizes or confirms the notion of a coherent Enlightenment narrative.

Hist 440W-01 (TH), History of Modern Socialism  (Smaldone)
This course examines the rise of socialism in Europe in the context of industrialization and the development of modern society.  We will study the emergence of socialist ideas and mass movements from their emergence in the French Revolution through the European-wide revolutions of 1848, the Paris Commune of 1871, the Russian Revolutions of 1917, the Cold War, and the collapse of communism in 1991.  Particular attention will be given to the emergence social democracy in Western Europe and communism in the East.  We will also consider the prospects for socialism in post-Cold War Europe.

"One Time Only" Courses

One Time Only Courses with MOI Designation

 


Special Topics Courses

CCM 360-01 Topics in Public Discourse: Freedom of Speech (Bost)This course deals with the history of freedom of speech.  Beginning with the roots of free speech in classical Greece, we will explore speech and expression as legal concepts (especially in US Supreme Court case law) as well as appeals to free speech and expression by a number of 19th, 20th and 21st-century social movements.  Along the way, we will deal with questions of the relationship between free speech and democracy, the relationship between “speech” and non-linguistic forms of political expression (from visual rhetoric to protests to political violence), the ethics of free speech, the relationship between political speech and identity (especially gender, race and class identity) and the effects of corporate speech and digital media on contemporary freedoms of expression  (Previously RHET 350) 

 
CCM 360-02 Topics in Public Discourse: U.S. Civil Rights (Swift)
This course examines public discourses over the racial civil rights movements of 1954-68 in the United States. It focuses primarily on 1) the analysis of primary texts from this period as examples of persuasive civic argument (oratory, essays, photo/journalism, etc.), but also includes discussion of 2) historical precedent for these discourse and 3) their legacy in subsequent public deliberation.  (Previously RHET 350)

Hist 114-01 (TH), US History: Later Period (Jopp)This course surveys American history from Reconstruction after the Civil War to the present. Key topics include Reconstruction and the subsequent rise of the Jim Crow system, industrialization and labor, immigration and ethnic/racial relations, the New Deal and the rise of liberalism, the Cold War, and the conservative resurgence. Analysis of primary source materials will be emphasized, along with the study of the variety of historical interpretations of modern American history. 

Hist 115-01 (TH), Western Civilization to 1650 (Duvall)
A survey of the cultural, intellectual, political and socioeconomic developments of Western society. It examines ancient Near Eastern, Greek and Roman societies, the rise of Christianity, the Medieval period, the Renaissance and Reformation and the Age of Absolutism. Among the fundamental aims of the course is to identify the defining characteristics of different phases of Western historical development and to study the factors that precipitate long- and short-term historical change. The course is very broad in scope and seeks to provide students with a sense of how Western ideas, social relations and institutions have changed over time and how these changes are interrelated. It also aims to acquaint students with different approaches to historical inquiry.

Hist 131-01 (TH), France in World War II (Braun)
This course explores the French experience in World War II from a variety ofperspectives. It will cover military aspects of the traumatic French defeatas well as political issues, notably the conflict pitting Vichy and thecollaborationists against the Free French and the Resistance. But it willgive as much time to social, cultural and intellectual issues: how theFrench coped with the German occupation and how they kept alive the veryidea of France. Irène Némirovsky’s posthumous bestseller, Suite française,with be a central reading.

Hist 131-02 (TH), Gender and Society in East Asia (McCaffrey)
This course focuses on gender relations in East Asia as a subject worthy of historical inquiry.  The course takes a comparative and historical approach to the topic, investigating the evolution of gender relations in the societies of China and Japan in the pre-modern and modern periods.  The ultimate aim of the course is to deconstruct popular depictions of Asian gender relations as an undifferentiated custom characterized by patriarchy and strict Confucian mores.

Hist 131-03 (TH), Postwar Japan: Feminisms and Protest  (Loftus)
This class will explore what went into the making of postwar Japan--how Japan fared under the Allied Occupation, how economic recovery was effected, and how women were granted suffrage and began to be conceptualized in new ways in discourse.  During the postwar era, Japanese society was transformed by three major developments: 1) the "high speed economic growth" that constituted the postwar economic miracle; 2) mass political protest movements and second wave feminism that transformed Japanese society in the 1960s and 1970s; and 3) the demographic time bomb which, along with serious economic downturns and the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami, have presented Japan with unprecedented challenges.   

HIST 131-04 (TH) The Pacific War, 1931-1945
World War II in the Pacific was engaged most directly in 1937 and 1941, when China and then the United States declared war against Japan.  However, for many people in East Asia, the conflict was engaged as early as 1931, when Japan occupied and colonized NE china (Manchuria).  The war came to a dramatic close in 1945 with the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.  This course engages the Pacific War from the Asian viewpoint, focusing on particular on the experiences of the people involved, soldiers and civilians alike.  It will also consider how memories of the war, differently constructed on different sides, has shaped contemporary histories of Pacific Rim nations.

Hist 221W-01, History Workshop: Slave Narratives  (Cotlar)
This course is organized around two central questions.  One is methodological, “how can we recover the experiences and hear the voices of enslaved people from nineteenth century America?”  The second question is more empirical, “What do those voices tell us about the history of race and slavery in America?” This class starts from the assumption that no one was better situated to answer the question “what was slavery?” than enslaved people themselves.  The challenge then, is to figure out how we can use the very partial historical record left behind to try to reconstruct the world-views, experiences, and aspirations of the tens of millions of African-Americans who experienced enslavement in the years between the American Revolution and the Civil War. At the end of the course, each student will produce a 10-15 page essay based upon extensive, original research. 

Hist 342-01, History of American Conservatism (Cotlar)
The rise of conservatism has been one of the most significant political phenomena of the post-WWII era.  This course will examine the many different (and often conflicting) varieties of conservatism that have emerged since WWII, tracing their roots to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Students will engage with a wide range of primary sources as well as works by historians that offer competing interpretations of conservatism's history and meaning.

Hist 344W-01, Rebellion and Resistance in East Asia  (McCaffrey)
This course will examine rebellion and resistance in comparative perspective, focusing on China, Japan, and Korea in the 18th-20th centuries. We will study a wide range of protest events, including large-scale movements such as the Taiping Rebellion as well as everyday acts of resistance. Within that range, we will pay particular attention to religious belief and gender politics as contributing factors in popular uprisings. We will utilize a variety of theoretical perspectives on collective action as a means of explaining popular rebellion and resistance in East Asia.

Hum 497W: Our Bodies Ourselves  (Dunlap)
From a mimeographed pamphlet collectively authored and passed around hand-to-hand by feminists in 1969 to a 944-page ninth edition and multiple formats, Our Bodies Ourselves—sometimes known as the Bible of the women’s health movement--has revolutionized readers’ relationships to bodies, each other, the medical profession, and the production of knowledge over four decades and over two dozen countries.  This Humanities seminar will consider the text as a window onto the social movements and literary traditions that generated it, as well as engage in close readings and analysis of the political and theoretical questions it raises about bodies, power, intimacy, human nature, and how we explain and experience cultural and physical difference