Aaron D. Simowitz

Assistant Professor of Law

Professor Simowitz teaches international business transactions, debtor and creditor law, negotiation, and a seminar on resolving business disputes. His research focuses on cross-border business transactions, litigation, and arbitration. 

Before joining Willamette University College of Law, Simowitz was a research fellow at New York University’s (NYU) Center for Transnational Litigation, Arbitration, and Commercial Law and a fellow at the Classical Liberal Institute at NYU. He taught International Litigation & Arbitration with Professor Linda Silberman and before that was an acting assistant professor in the Lawyering Program at NYU. He also taught International Business Transactions at Columbia Law School.

Simowitz received the 2014 Young Scholar’s Award from the American Society of International Law’s Private International Law Interest Group for his work on judgment and award enforcement against intangible assets. He practiced at the New York office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, and clerked for Judge D. Brooks Smith of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. 

Education

  • JD, 2006, University of Chicago
  • BA, 2000, Harvard University

Publications

  • "Legislating Transnational Jurisdiction," 57 Virginia Journal of International Law (forthcoming 2017).
  • "Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments and Awards: What Hath Daimler Wrought?," 91 New York University Law Review 344 (with Linda J. Silberman)(2016).
  • "Siting Intangibles," 46 New York University Journal of International Law and Politics (2016) .
  • "Transnational Enforcement Discovery, 83 Fordham Law Review 3293 (2015).
  • "A U.S. Perspective on Forum Shopping, Ethical Obligations, and International Commercial Arbitration," Forum Shopping the International Commercial Arbitration Context 23 (Franco Ferrari, ed.)(2013).
  • "How Criminal Law Shapes Institutional Structures," 50 American Criminal Law Review 417 (2013).
  • "The Original Understanding Of The Capture Clause," 59 DePaul Law Review 121 (2009).