Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals

2018

January 12 summaries

Calef v. City of Seaside

Under OAR 661-010-0021(5)(e), if no amended notice of intent to appeal is filed or no original notice of intent to appeal is refilled, the appeal will be dismissed.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Hood River Valley Residents v. Hood River County

Under HRCZO 60.12, if an application for a short-term rental permit is denied, a new application may not be filed for at least one year from the original application date.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Hood River Valley Residents v. Hood River County

Under HRCZO 53.30(A) determining whether an application is a “resident of the property” for the purposes of HRCZO 53.30(A) requires the exercise of discretion. Additionally, the determination of whether a “STR will not unreasonably interfere with other uses permitted in the zone and whether the STR is a secondary use, incidental, accessory or subordinate to the residential uses or the existing building” is highly discretionary.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Bishop v. Deschutes County

Based on ORS 197.805, LUBA has long held that it will decline to exercise jurisdiction over appeals where review would have no practical effect on the rights of properties.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Save TV Butte v. Lane County

Under OAR 660-023-0030, Goal 5 planning for significant mineral and aggregate resource sites begins with the inventory process. The inventory process concludes with a comprehensive plan list or inventory of significant resource sites.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Home Builders Association v. City of Eugene

ORS 197.307(4), sets fourth regulations that may apply to development of needed housing on land included in the urban growth boundary (UGB) and on the Buildable Lands Inventory (BLI), but the regulation does not apply the city’s initial determination of what land is included in a city’s inventory.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Simpson v. City of Brownsville

Under OAR 661-010-0021(5)(e), if no amended notice of intent to appeal is filed or no original notice of intent to appeal is refilled, the appeal will be dismissed.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Holmberg v. Deschutes County

The term “in conjunction with” located in ORS 215.283 means that temporary hardship dwellings must be in close proximity to the existing dwelling on the property.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Holmberg v. Deschutes County

The term “in conjunction with” located in ORS 215.283 means that temporary hardship dwellings must be in close proximity to the existing dwelling on the property.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Crowley v. City of Hood River

Under HRCP Goal 8, Policy 1, the city of Hood River must protect existing parks from being impacted by incompatible uses on nearby lands, but the city council may nevertheless elect to rezone existing parks to allow for new uses.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Richards v. Jefferson County

ORS 215.283(1)(d) authorizes the county to approve an accessory dwelling on EFU-zoned land to be occupied by a relative of the farm operator, if “the farm operator does or will require the assistance of the relative in the management of the farm use[.]”

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

February 3 summaries

Northwest Alliance Corvallis v. City of Corvallis

Under OAR 661-010-0021(5)(e), if no amended notice of intent to appeal is filed or no original notice of intent to appeal is refilled, the appeal will be dismissed.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Wolcott v. Lane County

ORS 197.830(6) does not necessarily prohibit counties from considering the finality, nature, and effect of the decision in resolving the issues raised by a petitioner’s application.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Oregon Coast Reliance v. Tillamook County

The LUO 11.030 code definition of the term ‘recreational vehicle’ makes it clear that under the LUO as currently written the use category ‘recreation vehicle’ at LUO 3.008(3)(r) is limited to nonresidential vacation, emergency or recreational use, and that a recreational vehicle can be used for a permanent residence only within a mobile/manufactured home park or similar facility.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

March 6 summaries

Hudson v. Jackson County

Under ORS 197.015(10)(a), a floodplain development permit decision requires a determination of whether existing structures serve uses that are allowed or authorized in the RR-5 zone and is therefore not an exception to the statute.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Central Oregon Landwatch v. Crook County

OAR 660-033-0130(4)(c)(B)(i) states that “a lot, parcel, or portion of a lot or parcel, shall not be considered unsuitable solely because of size or location. . . .” A county must consider factors other than size or location when determining suitability.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Landwatch Lane County v. Lane County

Continual use of parcel as a school satisfies the requirements of ORS 215.130(5) and LC 16.251(5), establishing a “vested right” to continue previously conforming use which is presently nonconforming.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Catherine Caudle vs. City of Dunes City

LUBA does not have jurisdiction to review a city ordinance appeal when a local government acts pursuant to its authority to prohibit marijuana businesses within its jurisdictional boundaries.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Cossins v. Josephine County

Under ORS 215.503, counties must provide property owners with advance, individual, written notice by mail of the first hearing on an ordinance that proposes to rezone their property. Such notice must include specific information and be sent within a specified time frame. Failure to provide sufficient notice may prejudice property owners’ substantial rights even if they participated in one or more of the hearings held below.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Brannon v. Multnomah County

Under MCC 33.2256(B), no reduction of the required Primary Fire Safety Zone is permitted for a nonconforming adjustment or variance.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

April 5 summaries

Feetham v. Jackson County

In determining the scope or extent of a nonconforming use right, the relevant legal question is the extent of the activity that is actually occurring on the date when the use becomes nonconforming, with an allowance for changes in the volume or intensity of the use if they are attributable to growth or fluctuations in business conditions.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Aboud vs. City of Stayton

LUBA has the authority to reverse or remand a local government decision if the local government failed to follow the procedures applicable to the matter before it in a manner that prejudiced the substantial rights of the petitioner.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Seits vs. Yamhill County

LUBA did not have jurisdiction to reverse and remand a decision to approve a conditional use permit when the decision was made based on the county’s building code which has not been adopted as part of the county’s land use code.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Hill v. City of Portland

The width of the local street right-of-way must be sufficient to accommodate expected users, taking into consideration the characteristics of the site and vicinity, such as the existing street and pedestrian system improvements, existing structures, and natural features.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Martin v. City of Tigard

City council interpretations of their own land use laws are subject to a highly deferential standard of review by LUBA, under which it must affirm a governing body’s interpretation of local land use legislation unless that interpretation is implausible.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

May 4 summaries

King v. Deschutes County

Under DCC 18.116.330(B)(10)(a) and (b), the county must find a proposed marijuana production facility will not unreasonably interfere with the neighbor’s use and enjoyment of their property. The finding must be supported by a report from a licensed engineer.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Patel vs. City of Portland

Under PCC 33.430.280, “site-related” development standards include height and setback standards as being consistent with the purposes of environmental zones and review.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Landwatch Lane County v. Lane County

Only when a property’s soil type does not meet the definition of “agricultural land” is the local government to look to other factors in determining whether to classify land as “agricultural land.”

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

McLoughlin Neighborhood Association v. City of Oregon City

(1) In the absence of specific requirements from LUBA or procedures adopted by the local governments themselves, local governments have discretion to determine the preferred method of resolving decisions on remand. (2) A local government’s adoption of a historic resource regulatory scheme is not necessarily an implied waiver of statutory rights to refuse consent to historic designations of local government-owned property. (3) A city manager’s authority to exercise “supervision over all city property” is sufficiently broad to include the authority to refuse to consent to historic designation of city-owned property. (4) ORS 197.772(1) authorizes both public and private property owners to refuse to consent to historic designation of their property.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

June 6 summaries

Central Oregon Landwatch v. Deschutes County

The mere threat of potential litigation against the county is an insufficient basis, under OAR 660-023-0040(4) and (5), and the definition of the ESEE for the county to abandon or disavow a portion of its acknowledged Goal 5 program.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Friends of Canemah v. City of Oregon City

ORS 197.835(9)(a)(B) allows LUBA to reverse or remand a land use decision of a local government if the local government made a procedural error and that error prejudiced the substantial rights of the petitioner.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Landwatch Lane County v. Lane County

(1) A county ordinance identifying a parcel designated for forest uses in its Statewide Planning Goal 5 inventory of significant mineral and aggregate sites is sufficient evidence to support a county’s conclusion that an inconsistency exists between an ordinance and a plan or zoning map for purposes of making conformity determination amendments. (2) LUBA generally does not consider arguments in footnotes that set out different legal theories than those presented in the assignments of error themselves.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Landwatch Lane County v. Lane County

Where local governments choose to provide an alternative procedure for property line adjustments, the alternative procedure must include local government approval of some kind. Accordingly, a post-hoc approval process is permissible.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Reed v. Jackson County

Because Jackson County neglected to determine whether sections of the Jackson County Land Development Ordinance required loading spaces, but applied other areas of the statute, "the county must address whether the section applies and if it does, whether it is met."

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

Gu v. City of Bandon

Under BMC 17.92.040(G), the city council must determine whether the conditions and limitations that an applicant has agreed to in its conditional use permit application will “alter the character of the surrounding area in a manner which substantially limits, impairs, or precludes the use of surrounding properties.”

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

July 3 summaries

City of Albany v. Linn County

OAR 661-010-0071(1)(c) states that LUBA shall reverse a land use decision where the decision “violates a provision of applicable law and is prohibited as a matter of law.” LLC 938.340(B) allows for variances which are “consistent with the city’s comprehensive plan,” LUBA found that this variance was not and it was, therefore, “prohibited as a matter of law.”

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Friends of Douglas County v. Douglas County

A decision approving a boundary line adjustment to a parcel under applicable standards does not “collaterally attack” the decisions that created the parcel under different standards, even if the adjusted parcel would not comply with those different standards.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

McAndrew v. Washington County

In order to bring assignments of error to LUBA, petitioners must raise their issues during the initial proceedings, otherwise, they are waived, under ORS 197.835(3) and ORS 197.763(1).

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

August 8 summaries

Rogue Advocates v. Josephine County

Where a county does not address or adopt findings in response to an argument below concerning the interpretation of its own land use laws, it is inappropriate for LUBA to interpret the relevant provisions of the county’s land use laws in the first instance before giving the county an opportunity to address the issue itself on remand.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife v. Lake County

LCZO 18.05(D)(6) mandates 160-acre minimum parcel size for new land division within big game habitat.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

VanSickle v. Klamath County

Adequate findings are required to support quasi-judicial land use decisions and such findings must identify the relevant approval standards, set out facts which are believed and relied upon, and must include explanations of how those facts lead to the decision on compliance with the approval standards.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Newbrook v. City of Portland

To determine whether the local decision maker’s conclusion is supported by substantial evidence, the evidence must be what a reasonable person would rely on in reaching a decision.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Oregon Coast Alliance v. Curry County

Under ORS. 215.246(3), the scope of the phrase “alternatives” may be interpreted broadly enough to include alternative sources and methods for obtaining irrigation water, in addition to means and routes of transporting it, however, any written explanation by an applicant rejecting identified alternatives will satisfy the statute’s burden.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Lundeen v. City of Waldport

While the feasibility of a proposed planned development must be shown at the preliminary plan stage—requiring substantial evidence that solutions to certain problems posed by the project are possible, likely, and reasonably certain to succeed—detailed technical matters involved in selecting particular solutions and requiring expert evaluation may be deferred to the final plan stage for administrative review and approval.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Central Oregon Landwatch v. Deschutes County

If the record establishes that the land in question does not possess soil suitable for farm use, petitioner cannot claim that this conclusion is erroneous based on surrounding land’s suitability.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Land Use

Meyer v. Jackson County

While a county may impose a more expansive definition of “floodway” than that offered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the county has declined to do so in this case.

Area(s) of Law:
  • Municipal Law

September 0 summaries

October 0 summaries