Course Descriptions - Elective Courses

Elective courses in each area of interest are offered every year. However not all elective courses listed below are offered on an annual basis. 

Most courses have prerequisites. Students seeking to take a course for which they have not met the listed prerequisite must present their credentials to the instructor and receive approval from the instructor to register for the course. 

GSM 6002: Entrepreneurial Finance (3 credits)

Experiential learning course where students learn real-world financial operations for small to medium sized businesses. The class will walk students through the progressive development of financial models, tools and strategies used to start and operate a business. The class will begin with pro-forma development and move through startup funding, financial operations, growth, and exit. Real-world examples, cases and situation analysis will be heavily emphasized. Many of the topics covered address specific issues business owners deal with on a day-to-day basis, the resolution of which, significantly impact their success or failure.

  • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.
  • Enrollment cap: 25

GSM 6003: Financial Analysis (3 credits)

The goal of the course is to provide hands-on experience in financial analysis, including concepts, methods, and analytical skills such as time and money, identification and estimation of risk, calculation of opportunity cost of invested capital, estimation and valuation of discounted cash flows, capital budgeting, valuation of interest tax shields, reorganization of financial statements, and valuation of companies.

  • Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required fall semester courses with a grade of B or better in each course. Open only to first-year students.
  • Enrollment cap: 25

GSM 6004 E-Commerce and Digital Marketing (3 credits)

For many leading companies, e-commerce and digital marketing strategies have taken center stage. This course explores the emerging role of technology in Marketing from a variety of perspectives. Particular emphasis is placed on such practices as online advertising, email marketing, SEO, web analytics and social media. Vital topics such as online buyer behavior, reputation management, privacy issues and integrated marketing communications will also be discussed. Students in this course can expect to gain hands-on experience using an online marketing simulation, as well as valuable insights from current case studies and interactions with industry experts. Upon completion of the course, students should understand and be able to evaluate the merit of e-commerce strategies and have the foundation necessary to develop an effective digital marketing campaign.

  • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5107
  • Course fee: Each student will be required to purchase a simulation package. The cost of the software is approximately $50.

GSM 6005: Tech Trek (3 credits)

The logic of this elective follows two parallel paths. The first path is an examination of academic work on the diffusion of innovations, discontinuous change, industry disruption and technology adoption. The knowledge from these works will provide a foundation for the second path. The second path is to research specific student selected technologies. At the start of the semester, students choose the area for their research work throughout the semester. Any core technology is eligible (stem cells, 3D printing, electric vehicles, biocomputing or even quantum nonlocality), and final selections will be agreed with the professor. In general, students are expected to generate an understanding of how businesses make money around innovations. How technology advances. How adoption might change firms, industries, and the world. Students will be expected to apply rigorous thinking to the construction of a detailed and plausible scenario for the development of economic and social activity around their chosen technology.

  • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.
  • Enrollment cap: 20

GSM: 6006 Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination (3 credits)

Students gain perspective on the risks and impacts of fraud within an organization and how to effectively apply controls within business processes to mitigate potential fraud opportunities, and appropriate managerial responses when a fraud occurs within the organization. Students learn how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved; recommend systems and behaviors that will reduce the risk of fraud in a cost-benefit manner; and understand how and why occupational fraud is committed. The course includes examples of fraud and internal control weaknesses in business, governmental and nonprofit organizations.

  • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5105

GSM 6201: Public Policy Studies (3 credits)

Studies the process of policy formation, as well as the tools and methods used to conduct policy analysis. The course examines a variety of policy areas of current interest. Students prepare position papers, diagnosing policy problems and evaluating alternative solutions in terms of their political, economic, legal, and administrative feasibility.

    GSM 6202: Product Planning (3 credits)

    Product Planning acquaints students with the key issues in product and brand management at various stages in the product life cycle. The class places particular emphasis on marketing's role in introducing new product or service innovations. It also covers how marketing interacts with operations and finance in the process. The course includes lectures and case studies and requires a course project designed to allow students to practice the lessons emphasized in the course.

    • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5107

    GSM 6203: Seminar in Benefit-Cost Analysis (3 credits)

    Examines public cost-benefit analysis. Uses elementary capital budgeting, discounting, market analysis, and project costing to evaluate alternate public policies, and builds skills to communicate quantitative analysis clearly and persuasively to a lay audience. Topics include valuation of benefits and costs, including gains and losses to different groups, and the politics of cost-benefit analysis. Public policies examined include operating investments, physical investment and the environment, investments in human capital, intergovernmental grants, tax expenditures and social regulation.

    • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
    • Enrollment Cap: 20

    GSM 6204: Auditing: Risk and Controls (3 credits)

    Provides an introduction to the purpose, process and role of auditing and internal controls within an organization, and discusses the importance of identifying and assessing the risks facing an organization, from both audit and management viewpoints. Students examine the professional standards and frameworks for auditing, information technology, risk and controls. Students learn the importance of good governance structure for an organization and strong enterprise risk management practices. Students also learn to effectively communicate the risk and effects of fraud within an organization, and recognize how to apply controls within business processes to mitigate potential fraud opportunities and impact. Course includes an experiential project which entails the planning and execution of an internal audit engagement that describes a business process and the risks associated with that business process, documents the process and the key controls over the process, creates and executes a testing plan and work-papers to support the findings, and communicates the findings and recommendations of the engagement in written and oral presentations.

    • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5105

    GSM 6205: Financial Reporting (3 credits)

    This advanced course begins by consolidating student knowledge of financial accounting and progresses to study the conceptual and practical limitations of GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) reporting, including important recent and forthcoming changes both domestically and globally. We will explore where and how important events are recorded or not recorded and valued, including deferred tax assets and liabilities, environmental liabilities and contingencies, pension and other post-retirement assets and liabilities, incentive stock options, convertible instruments, mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures, compensation disclosure, as well as non-GAAP reporting. In doing so, we will particularly emphasize the various numbers that are used and reorganized for valuation and other calculations. We will also give special attention to the rule changing activities of the FASB (Federal Accounting Standards Board), the SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) and IASB (International Accounting Standards Board). Some topics will be coordinated with the application of accounting information to financial analysis done in GSM-680 Strategic Finance. In addition to an advanced textbook, course materials include 10-K reports, pronouncements from accounting and regulatory authorities, journal, newspaper, and Web articles, business cases, and applied exercises.

    • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5105
    • Enrollment cap: 30

    GSM 6206: Financial Statement Analysis (3 credits )

    This course presents the tools and techniques used to interpret publicly available accounting reports to evaluate the health and potential of organizations. Students will learn how to measure and analyze a firm’s current profitability and financial stability and how to forecast the firm’s future performance. They will learn how to benchmark a firm against its own past performance, competitor performance and industry performance, and how to apply financial statement analysis to financial statements of government and non-profit organizations. Upon completion of the course, each student will have the ability to generate logically consistent and defensible forecasts of a firm’s future financial performance.

    • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

    GSM 6210: Accounting for Decision Making (3 credits)

    Accounting for Decision Making focuses on providing information that aids managers in planning, decision making, and monitoring the organization’s performance. Analyses that support decision making are emphasized. The areas covered are cost behavior analysis, cost accounting systems, planning, and management control systems. Specific topics include Cost-Volume-Profit analysis, ABC costing, budgeting, variance analysis interpretation, short term decision making, and performance evaluation measures such as Return on Investment (ROI) and Economic Value Added (EVA). Additionally, the Balanced Scorecard and other managerial innovations will be covered. Applications for nonprofits and government organizations as well as for-profit firms are included. In addition to an intermediate managerial accounting text, course materials will include cases, applied exercises and current articles as appropriate.

    • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

    GSM 6211: Managing Organizational Change (3 credits)

    Examines concepts and practices of planned organizational change and development. Course topics include methods and strategies for change, change recipients, entry processes, organizational diagnosis, intervention approaches, assessment of change and follow-up. Emphasizes the role of managers and their agents in designing, initiating and carrying out organizational changes.

    • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101 and 5102
    • Enrollment cap: 20
    • Course fee: One-day simulation on organizational change, cost $50. The cost covers all materials, training and full access to the simulation for three additional months.

    GSM 6215: Compensation and Rewards (3 credits)

    Introduces the "art" of managing compensation including internal consistency, external competitiveness, employee contributions, employee benefits, government role and compliance, and managing a compensation system. While offering an overview and theory of base-pay compensation, it is primarily designed to address the practical issues faced by practitioners in creating and administering a compensation program.

    • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101 and 5102
    • Enrollment cap: 30

    GSM 6216: Business and Economic Forecasting (3 credits)

    Covers qualitative and quantitative forecasting techniques with emphasis on statistical modeling and interpretation of numerical data. Topics include multiple regression, exponential smoothing, decomposition methods, and Box-Jenkins analysis. Examples and case work are based on business and economic data at both the firm and macro-economic levels.

    • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5103

    GSM 6217: Strategic Applications of Quantitative and Information Tools (3 credits)

    The course draws from the topics of forecasting, database management systems, data mining, management science, enterprise resource planning, decision support systems, statistical modeling, web-based application development, linear programming and optimization to develop integrated solutions to strategic management problems. Students work in groups and as a class to design and assemble prototype systems. Students work in groups, design and assemble prototype systems, and use a variety of software tools for optimization, statistic modeling, and database management.

    • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum and one or more quantitative/technology elective courses, including, but not limited to - GSM 6216, GSM 6219, GSM 6220, GSM 6222, GSM 6260, GSM 6272, GSM 6275 or instructor approval.

    GSM 6218: Global Human Resource Management (3 credits)

    Reviews the impact of globalization on HR practice and focuses on the six knowledge and task domains of HR practitioners working at the international or global level: global HR strategic management; global organizational effectiveness and employee development; global staffing; global compensation and benefits; international assignment management; and employee relations and international regulations.

    • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

    GSM 6219: Spreadsheet Modeling for Managerial Decision Making (3 credits)

    This course involves the use of mathematical models to generate meaningful information and insight for a quantitative basis for decision making. This course is designed to provide the student with the skill to think quantitatively and analytically about managerial decision problems, understand the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of mathematical modeling, and finally an ability to recognize situations where this approach is useful. Spreadsheet based software will be used to introduce linear programming and its variations, decision analysis under uncertainty and simulation. The course will also integrate concepts from Operations Management, Finance and Marketing.

    • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

    GSM 6220: Lean Six Sigma (3 credits)

    In this course, students will learn the concepts, frameworks, and problem-solving tools of Lean Six Sigma. Lean Six Sigma is a synergized managerial concept of Lean and Six Sigma that results in reducing waste and cost, improving quality and speed, improving business processes, and achieving high organizational performance. A typical Lean Six Sigma project comprises the Lean's waste elimination effort and the Six Sigma project based on the critical quality characteristics: The former aims at reducing or eliminating various types of waste (including defects, overproduction, waiting, nonutilized resources, transportation, inventory, motion, and excessive processing), while the latter aims at providing goods and service at a rate of 3.4 defects per million opportunities. This course should be useful for the students who are interested in pursuing their management careers in the area of Operations, Analysis and Systems or Sustainability Management.

    • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5103, 5110 and 5114

    GSM 6221: Integrated Business Planning (3 credits )

    Integrated business planning (IBP) produces the numbers that top executives need to run the organization and provides a platform for deploying strategies. It is the process that enables an executive team to establish the desired levels of customer service, inventory investment, customer order backlogs, and the resulting financial performance -- and then proactively manage the business to achieve those targets. AMR Research calls Integrated Business Planning the "ultimate best business practice." This course is likely to be of interest to students interested in marketing, operations, finance, human resources, and entrepreneurship. Students will actively work with a client company as a live case. Students will be required to travel to Portland to observe the client company in action. In addition, some classes may be held at the Willamette University Portland Center.

    • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum PLUS instructor permission. Requires a basic understanding of how customer serving organizations are structured and work, and an understanding of marketing, operations, engineering, finance or human resources. Students may find it helpful to have taken GSM 6249 and/or GSM 6269.

    GSM 6222: Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World (3 credits)

    Business dynamics is an introductory class on "System Dynamics" - a method of understanding the world that embraces complexity, feedback, and endogeneity. The class will prepare you to solve complex problems using a system level view, translate your thinking into computer models, and evaluate competing explanations for surprising behavior. The class includes discussions and examples of government agencies, corporate entities, and non-profit groups that have used a system dynamics approach to solve problems facing them. The class will also feature "management flight simulators" that allow you to test strategies before implementing them in an organizations. Business Dynamics is NOT a math or computer computer programming experience. For more information about systems thinking see (http://www.systemdynamics.org/what_is_system_dynamics.html).

      GSM 6223: Enterprise Data Management (3 credits)

      Database management is the foundation of any information system and plays a crucial role in the operations of all organizations in the business, government, and nonprofit sectors. This course introduces the fundamentals of modern database concepts and database development skills. Students learn to: analyze an enterprise’s data management requirements and integrate data management across functional areas; analyze the requirements of data management and design a conceptual database model using entity relationship modeling, relational design, and normalization; use the Structured Query Language (SQL), the current relational database standard, to implement the conceptual database model into a state-of-the art database management system such as MySQL or Microsoft Access; and use SQL to retrieve data to support business operations and decision making.

      • Prerequisite(s): GSM-5103

      GSM 6226: Venture Investing I -- fall semester of year-long course (3 credits)

      Experiential learning course where MBA students learn the strategies and details involved with investing in entrepreneurial ventures. Students are embedded as active investing members in Angel investment groups throughout the Pacific Northwest; evaluating deal flow, performing due diligence and making investment decisions. Investment decisions are made by the students with the oversight of the Advisory Board. Additionally, students work on cutting edge research in the fields of angel investing, venture investing, entrepreneurship and economic development.

      • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum PLUS instructor permission.

      GSM 6227: Venture Investing II -- spring semester of year-long course (3 credits)

      Experiential learning course where MBA students learn the strategies and details involved with investing in entrepreneurial ventures. Students are embedded as active investing members in Angel investment groups throughout the Pacific Northwest; evaluating deal flow, performing due diligence and making investment decisions. Investment decisions are made by the students with the oversight of the Advisory Board. Additionally, students work on cutting edge research in the fields of angel investing, venture investing, entrepreneurship and economic development.

      • Prerequisite(s): GSM 6226

      GSM 6228: Enterprise Development and Entrepreneurial Thinking (3 credits)

      The objective of the course is to understand how expert entrepreneurs think through opportunities and strategies as they create sustainable for-profit or not-for-profit organizations in an environment of uncertainty. The course will involve working sessions with entrepreneurs in the community, and involve sessions in Portland in addition to Salem class time. Areas of focus: business model design, venture finance, marketing in new organizations, and direct selling.

      • Enrollment cap: 35

      GSM 6229: Principles of Management Consulting (3 credits)

      This is an introductory course about management consulting. The course focuses on understanding the management consulting profession, the ethics of consulting and the consultant/client relationship. Students will develop consulting skills and techniques to objectively diagnose, evaluate, and improve management and organizational performance. Students will learn how to identify and diagnose organizational performance weaknesses and how to assemble information to support and implement recommendations for change.

        GSM 6230: Applied Competitive Intelligence (3 credits)

        Over the last 20 years, increasingly intense competitive forces have cut the length of time a company stays at the top of its industry in half. Today, you can’t find a Fortune 500 company that doesn’t have dedicated competitive intelligence professionals on staff and dedicated teams focused exclusively on analyzing the competition. Competitive Intelligence is a course that will equip you with the tools, frameworks, and best practices to enable you to systematically analyze a competitive business environment. The course will show you how to generate meaningful recommendations and insights that matter to planning, marketing, sales, and executive teams. This course will also cover the ethical and legal considerations you have to keep in mind while doing this type of research. The course includes a plethora of hands on activities where you’ll learn practical and most importantly, real-world examples of competitive intelligence fieldwork and analysis techniques applicable across business and non-profit realms. A large percentage of the course grade is based on the production of a competitive landscape review covering two firms in an industry of your choice.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
        • Enrollment cap: 30

        GSM 6231: Strategic Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations (3 credits)

        Identifies and examines processes for assessing, establishing and maintaining value-creating relationships among suppliers, providers and consumers of nonprofit organizations. Places particular emphasis on building productive exchange relationships with donors and clients.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5107

        GSM 6232: Public Finance (3 credits)

        Builds on core financial management skills to provide basic tools of financial and budget analysis needed for careers in public management and consulting, or for service as an elected or appointed official or voluntary board member. The course includes the study of financial theory which is concerned with the sources and uses of funds (taxing, borrowing, the cost of capital, and cash budgeting) and budgeting (budget process, operational budgeting and capital budgeting).

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.

        GSM 6233: Credit Risk and Fixed Income (3 credits)

        This course focuses on credit risk, credit analysis, and fluctuations in interest rates, and the ways they combine to determine the profitability of lending and investing in various forms of debt. Debt is everywhere: governments, corporations, and households borrow large amounts of money from institutional investors such as commercial banks, investment banks, insurance companies, pension funds, and mutual funds. We will study how debt markets operate, how debt is valued, how interest rates are determined, and how to analyze the credit risk of borrowers. We will then apply our learning to the current credit turmoil and its implications for the private and public sectors of the economy.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5110
        • Enrollment cap: 25

        GSM 6234: Organization Design (3 credits)

        Examines the processes by which managers design (organize, reorganize) their organizations. Topics include factors that constrain design options, organizational properties that are amenable to being changed and likely outcomes of different design decisions. Emphasizes the managerial exercise of design options; implications for managerial performance are drawn.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101 and 5102

        GSM 6235: Operations Management (3 credits)

        Broadly speaking, Operations Management concerns the processes by which work and resources are directed toward the achievement of strategic objectives. It thus requires a fundamental understanding of organizational strategy, processes, and resources. In addition to an overview of competitive strategy, specific topics include: process modeling and improvement, product and service design, capacity planning and analysis, work scheduling, and inventory management. Topical coverage is intended to provide "equal time" to production and service operations, the latter including those in government and non-for-profits. Coverage will also attempt to balance theory and applications, with an emphasis on "best practices". In addition to readings, homework problems and a midterm exam, students will be responsible for an operational analysis of a local business or governmental agency.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

        GSM 6236: HR Principles and Practices (3 credits)

        The course integrates critical new HR competencies, personnel skills and the application of business and policy knowledge along three HR processes: (1) acquiring and developing talent; (2) managing the employment relationship; and (3) strategic HRM. This course prepares you to assume an HR generalist role in an organizational setting by developing your proficiency in the basic body of HR knowledge.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101 and 5102
        • Enrollment cap: 30

        GSM 6237: Human Resource Experiential: Workforce Planning in the Public Sector (3 credits)

        This course focuses on the application of Human Resource concepts to workforce management issues in state government. Students will work directly with state agency managers and Human Resource professionals to examine data, identify issues, and work with state agencies on strategies to address workforce management issues.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101 and 5102

        GSM 6241: Industry Analysis (3 credits)

        This course covers a wide range of analysis topics and frameworks, unified by a focus on the settings in which organizations operate, commonly referred to as their “industry.” We also look beyond industry boundaries to see how companies interact across “arenas” which might encompass two, or more, industries as traditionally defined. Through a detailed industry project of the student's choice, multiple aspects of industry dynamics are addressed from various "lenses" such as: competition, business models, innovation, industry trends, complimentary and substitute products, etc. to determine optimal actions an organization might pursue.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

        GSM 6243: Sales Force Management (3 credits)

        Explores the importance of a well-managed sales force to the organization's viability and the applicability of various strategies, including structure, incentive, compensation, hiring, training, evaluation and forecast modeling, to the achievement of goals. All functional areas are impacted by the sales force's success in generating cost-effective revenues and long-term customer relationships. Thus, every professional benefits from a firm grasp of its management objectives and issues. Valuable for students whose success will be enhanced by understanding the sales force as a key internal customer as well as for those evaluating sales force management as a career choice. The course helps students to identify behavioral and analytical bases for successful sales force management and to become a knowledgeable user of both sales data and sales force input to the firm's business and marketing processes.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.

        GSM 6244: Enterprise Architecture Management (3 credits)

        This course seeks to use the concept of business architecture as a vehicle for performance analysis. Business architecture is defined as the organization’s design coupled with its information infrastructure design. To accomplish this, the course focuses first on transactional and decision making tasks in organizations and the underlying technical artifacts including the respective relational database and decision support systems design and implementation. This groundwork coupled with a basic understanding of organizational design is applied in a real-life setting where the student analyzes an enterprise’s architecture and its ability to support the organization’s mission.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5114. Students will be required to sign a non-disclosure agreement.
        • Enrollment cap: 15

        GSM 6245: Seminar in Management Control (3 credits)

        This is a seminar course that focuses on understanding the various informational problems within organizations, and how the design and use of management control mechanisms can affect shareholder value. Such mechanisms include strategic plans, SWOT analysis, delegation of authority, compensation and other monetary and nonmonetary rewards, budgets, transfer prices, and performance monitoring. Students will pay special attention to the influence of external factors such as customers, suppliers, technology, financial markets and regulatory constraints. Students will also examine similarities and differences between for-profit, non-profit and government organizations.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.
        • Enrollment cap: 20

        GSM 6248: HR Development: Creating Competitive Advantage (3 credits)

        Human resources are an often-under utilized source of sustained competitive advantage. Competency management and human resource development are essential components of an organization’s success. This course focuses on enhancing employee and organizational effectiveness through human resource development. Utilizing the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) design process, this course will provide students with an in-depth study of the concepts, processes, statistical analytics, and common pitfalls associated with employee competency development and management.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101, GSM 5102 and GSM 6236 (concurrent enrollment okay)
        • Enrollment cap: 15

        GSM 6249: Project Management (3 credits)

        This course provides an overview of the fundamental tools of project management throughout the project lifecycle, from initiation through execution and control to close. Concepts are tied closely to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (pmi.org). Case studies of real organizations focus on specific issues associated with new product development, process redesign, systems implementation and other projects and include discussion of culture, conflict, risk and change management. The student will also be introduced to modern project management software. (Note: MS Project is a MS Windows-based application).

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101 and GSM 5102 are recommended
        • Enrollment cap: 30

        GSM 6252: Global Entrepreneurship: Launching & Managing International Ventures (3 credits)

        This course examines the launch and management of business ventures that have international dimensions. The course will alert you to opportunities to internationalize company ventures, especially selling products and services abroad. We will focus on developing your knowledge to: identify internationalization opportunities; assess company readiness to internationalize; evaluate, launch, and manage international ventures; research and analyze key information; understand the complexities and challenges of international business; and learn about the various dimensions of key international markets, especially emerging markets and developing economies. Among other activities, students will devise an international business plan for the launch of an actual product or service in a foreign market.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.
        • Enrollment cap: 30

        GSM 6258: International Finance (3 credits)

        Examines fixed and floating exchange rates and monetary unions. Develops: 1) an understanding of the strategic and tactical foreign exchange exposure of exporters, importers and international corporations; and 2) techniques for hedging foreign exchange exposure with financial derivatives. Course involves intensive computer gaming of international economic scenarios, including international trade and international financial flows.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, and competency in Microsoft Excel.

        GSM 6260: Research for Marketing Decisions (3 credits)

        Designed to help students become wise "consumers" or users of marketing research. Defines marketing research as a set of techniques and principles for systematically collecting, recording, analyzing, and interpreting data that can aid decision makers who are involved in the marketing of goods, services, and ideas. Emphasizes techniques that provide information which reduces uncertainty in the decision making process and shifts the basis for decision making from intuitive information gathering to systematic and objective investigation.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.

        GSM 6261: Marketing Strategy (3 credits)

        Explores issues of strategic marketing and the formulation of marketing strategy. Key issues include new product introduction, managing an existing new product, using current strengths to enter new businesses/markets, and how organizational systems and processes relate to strategy formulation and implementation. The course involves case studies and a computer simulation called Markstrat. Students are expected to learn how to present persuasive oral and written reports. The course emphasizes learning-by-doing, and involves a substantial amount of work in teams.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5107
        • Enrollment cap: 35
        • Course fee: Each student will be required to purchase Marketing Engineering Software and Markstrat Software, neither of which run on Apple operating systems. The cost of the software is approximately $75. If you do not have the capability to run windows operating system on your PC you will need to purchase an emulator, e.g., Parallels or Bootcamp.

        GSM 6262: Integrated Marketing Communications (3 credits)

        Explores the role of communications in marketing management and the strategic integration of promotional tools, including public relations, advertising, sales promotion, personal selling, database and online marketing. Critically evaluates trends and the impact of marketing communications on individuals and on society as a whole. Through cases and projects, students will apply generic IMC concepts in various social and organizational contexts - commercial, non-profit, domestic, and international.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
        • Enrollment cap: 30

        GSM 6263: Seminar in Marketing and Public Policy (3 credits)

        The U. S. legal and regulatory system has a pervasive impact on marketing activities. This course surveys, evaluates, and discusses the legal and regulatory environment relevant to product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decision-making. Emphasis will be given to developing a working knowledge of the risks and opportunities which inhere in our legal and regulatory system's impact on marketing activities.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
        • Enrollment cap: 20

        GSM 6264: Financial Derivatives and Risk Management (3 credits)

        Financial derivatives are options, futures, and swaps, and their use is widespread and growing. The purpose of the course is to help students become better managers through the informed use of financial derivatives to create value. Students explore the use of financial derivatives to hedge price risk, increase profitability, increase the value of a firm, and improve market efficiency. The course also focuses on learning how to avoid the dangers of financial derivatives that flow from their potential to bankrupt organizations, threaten the stability of the financial system, and contribute to fraud.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.
        • Enrollment cap: 30

        GSM 6265: Not-For-Profit Governance and Management (3 credits)

        Examines the formation, financing, management and leadership of not-for-profit organizations. Provides practical leadership and management training. Readings, in-class exercises, and case studies provide in-depth understanding of the most significant issues affecting not-for-profit organizations. Includes a major class project involving a nonprofit organization.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
        • Enrollment cap: 30

        GSM 6267: Design Thinking (3 credits)

        Design thinking is a proven process for practically and creatively solving problems. It is an interdisciplinary field of study, communication and action that seeks to connect the diverse arts and sciences with each other and the purpose of enriching human life. The process of design thinking relies on being able to see the world around you differently from the way most people see it. This "seeing differently" is the way innovators spot where improvement can be made and the way they imagine and refine products that enable change. The course starts with students learning about their thinking style and becoming a member of a team that maximizes thinking-style diversity. The teams then share their interests with each other and collectively choose an aspect of human life in which to find and solve a problem. Students are then coached in the design thinking process - a process that combines empathy (i.e., being in another's shoes), radical collaboration (a partnership between diverse thinkers, and co-production among traditional creators and users), creativity, rationality, analytical thinking and integrative thinking (creatively combining ideas from many sources) to meet human needs and drive collective success.

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
        • Enrollment cap: 25
        • Course fee: Each student will be required to purchase XLMiner and PASW Modeler at the end of the first week of class. Students should expect an additional cost of approximately $102 to $132. For more information contact Professor Paul Dwyer.

        GSM 6268: Leadership (3 credits)

        Analyzes current leadership theories and leadership roles in practical everyday situations (teams, meetings, change, etc.).

        • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.
        • Enrollment cap: 25
        • Course fee: Each student will be required to purchase assessment inventories used in the course. Students should expect an additional cost of approximately $35 to $77.

        GSM 6269: Value Chain Management (3 credits)

        There are three business terms that are used relatively interchangeably: logistics, supply chain management, and value chain management. However, they are very different things. Logistics is the work required to move inventory throughout the supply chain in the most efficient and cost effective manner. As such, logistics focuses on reducing the costs of moving physical inventories and the components of physical inventory as they make their way to the ultimate end-user. As such, logistics focuses a great deal on the costs of transportation and warehousing of physical inventories. Supply Chain Management focuses on the management of the relationships between firms in order to facilitate the movement of inventory and the components of inventory. As such the focus is still on the reduction of costs, but it focuses more on how to facilitate information flows to reduce costs of physical inventories and the processes associated order processing, inventory management, and forecasting end demand. Value Chain Management focuses on managing logistics and the supply chain to support a firm's strategic position in order to both reduce costs and enhance revenues. In this course we will explore how logistics and supply chain concepts are used to support a firm's strategic position. The course will consist of lectures (by both the instructor and practitioners), simulations to illustrate important concepts, and case study discussions and exams designed to evaluate the understanding of students in the class. Class participation (not just attendance) will be expected and will be a significant component of the class.

        • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5103, 5105 and 5107

        GSM 6270: Economics of Strategy (3 credits)

        This course develops an economic view of strategic decision making for managers based on the theory of games. With a practical emphasis, we develop decision trees for ubiquitous problems including moral hazard, adverse selection, and optimal contingency planning. The same theory facilitates studying important properties of communication in strategic settings and auctions (explicitly designed markets that solve strategic problems). These topics permeate decision problems in the for profit, nonprofit, and public sectors. Specific cases for examination include (but aren't limited to) risk-sharing arrangements and insurance markets, the ”temptation” posed by inflation in monetary policy, M&A protocols, the informational content of corporate and political communications, an analysis of wireless spectrum auction design, and cap and trade systems.

          GSM 6271: Evidence-Based Management (3 credits)

          How do managers differentiate successful and failed policies/programs? Positive and negative outcomes only provide part of the answer: managers often cannot know what would have happened absent the intervention. Assessing the impact of a new policy/program thus represents a fundamental challenge for managers. This course teaches quantitative evaluation techniques for estimating the impact of policies, programs, and other interventions in for-profit, non-profit, and public enterprises. We will begin with designing interventions to facilitate easily measured effects. From this baseline, we will study modern statistical tools from structural equations modeling, causal and design-based inference, and measurement theory that allow managers to infer when interventions yield causal effects along with quantifying uncertainty about those effects. By using these tools to evaluate the impact of a policy or program intervention, managers can improve their decision making and optimize the allocation of scarce resources.

            GSM 6272: Data Sciences for Strategic Applications (3 credits)

            Dramatic rates of increase in the volume, velocity and variety of data create not only the opportunity, but the competitive necessity, to use data as a strategic resource. Data Science, while heavily informed by the elements of statistical thinking, also draws liberally on the tools and concepts of database management and computer science to address the challenges posed by large data sets and a broad range of statistical learning models. Class participants will have the opportunity to learn and apply the tools of data science by working closely with one or more client organizations to solve problems of strategic importance, problems that cut across the traditional functional areas of management. Building on the analytical foundation of standard multiple regression models, as covered in the required data analysis and modeling course, we will explore a variety of additional models for prediction, classification and segmentation – decision trees, logistic regression, neural networks, association rules and cluster analysis. We will also learn advanced tools and techniques for data management, visualization and dimensional reduction. Our work will be supported by a variety of software tools, likely including but not necessarily limited to – Excel, R, Tableau (an advanced data visualization tool) and IBM SPSS Modeler (a data mining environment.) Note: this course replaces our previous course "GSM 6272: Data Mining Applications for the Marketing of Information Based Products.

            • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5103
            • Enrollment cap: 20
            • Course fee -- $100 for required data mining software. Though we make every effort to identify high quality tools that are freely available, we may have to rely heavily on IBM SPSS Modeler. This package is available in the form of a low-cost (compared to the full commercial license fee) one-year student license at a cost of approximately $100. Further, Modeler runs only in the Windows environment and thus requires class participants to have ready access to Windows hardware or virtualization software that supports Windows applications running on Apple hardware.

            GSM 6274: HR Management in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors (3 credits)

            This course focuses on the concepts of Human Resource management as they relate to public sector and nonprofit administration. People providing services are at the heart of most public and nonprofit organizations. The goal of the course is apply your knowledge of general Human Resource principles to public and nonprofit organizations. Understanding the legal and political environments within which public personnel and labor laws operate will allow you to more effectively manage the resources available to you. The course will also explore emerging trends in public and nonprofit workforce demographics. Course uses selected readings, case studies and interactive class activities to develop your knowledge and skills in managing people and programs in public and nonprofit organizations. Guest speakers who are experienced professionals in the field will also be utilized.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

            GSM 6275: Supply Chain Modeling and Optimization (3 credits)

            A supply chain is a system of organizations, people, technology, activities, information, and resources involved in moving products and services from suppliers to customers. Essentially, supply chain management (SCM) is a cross-sectoral, interdisciplinary management area, which is reflected in at least two aspects. First, supply chains exist in virtually all private, public, and not-for-profit organizations that provide products and/or services. Second, many SCM problems involve marketing, financial planning, human resources scheduling, cost accounting, competitive analysis, production planning, and/or purchasing. This course is designed to help students gain a solid understanding of analytical techniques for supply chain management. It provides a practical overview of methods for supply chain modeling, analysis, and optimization. The central theme of this course is the use of data, models, and modeling systems to improve managerial decision making in supply chain management. This course applies a spreadsheet-based, application-driven approach for students to learn important supply chain models, problems, and solution methodologies, and to develop valuable modeling skills that students can appreciate and use effectively in their management careers.

            • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5103, 5110 and 5114

            GSM 6276: Social Networks for Managers (3 credits)

            This course is a seminar course about the management of organizational social networks and structure (whether in public, private, or not-for-profit organizations) in the contexts of navigating your professional career and creating value for yourself and your organization through coordination and control. Social networks, or those relationships between social actors NOT prescribed by the formal organizational structure, have been shown to be highly reliable conduits of knowledge and information. Both scholars and practitioners by and large agree that informal relationships are the key to what does (or does not) get done in organizations. In this course, you will learn how to identify, map, describe, and analyze the structure of these relations. You will also learn how to make social networks work for you by examining the ways in which through such structures scarce resources (including promotions) are being allocated, decisions are being made, behavior is constrained and/or enabled, and competitive advantages in careers, organizations, and markets are channeled.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
            • Enrollment cap: 20

            GSM 6278: Advanced Experiential HR (3 credits)

            This course provides an advanced HR experiential learning opportunity for students prior to graduation based on the global concepts and tools developed in GSM 6218. Students will undertake a real HR client project for an organization that operates internationally (choice of private, public, or non-profit sector).

            • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5101, GSM 5102 and GSM 6218. In cases where GSM 6218 and GSM 6278 are offered in the same semester, GSM 6278 may be taken concurrently with GSM 6218.

            GSM 6280: Strategic Finance (3 credits)

            This is an advanced course in corporate finance and the interaction of strategy and finance. Topics include non-GAAP accounting and its use in managing for value, modern techniques of valuation and determination of optimal capital structure, and the value of managerial flexibility in corporate strategy. Course materials include cases and other complex real-world problems.

            • Prerequisite(s): Completion of all prior required and elective courses with a grade of B or better in each course. Open only to second-year students.
            • Enrollment cap: 25

            GSM 6281: New Ventures to Launch I -- fall semester of year-long course (3 credits)

            Ready FIRE Aim. This is an entirely hands on course facilitating the creation of the participants' venture opportunities. Primary efforts are to get your new venture up and running. Secondary efforts are to use learning opportunities from that work with real market participants to refine your business model and further master the details of your opportunity. We are not shopping for opportunities, we are executing opportunities.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum PLUS instructor permission. Contact Professor Rob Wiltbank.

            GSM 6282: New Ventures to Launch II -- spring semester of year-long course (3 credits)

            Ready FIRE Aim. This is an entirely hands on course facilitating the creation of the participants' venture opportunities. Primary efforts are to get your new venture up and running. Secondary efforts are to use learning opportunities from that work with real market participants to refine your business model and further master the details of your opportunity. We are not shopping for opportunities, we are executing opportunities.

            • Prerequisite(s): GSM 6281

            GSM 6283: Corporate Finance (3 credits)

            Students in corporate finance course will learn how to plan, implement, and evaluate financing, investing, and dividend payout strategies in domestic and multinational corporations. The course is set within an applied analytical framework. Integrating corporate governance, financial and strategic, and regulatory dimensions, course focuses on applying finance concepts, analytical tool, and valuation models to analyze specific situations. Students evaluate corporate finance decisions utilizing case method. The course topics include advanced capital budgeting, equity, debt, and hybrid financing, risk and cost of capital, capital structure and dividend policies, mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, ethics, and government regulation of domestic and global corporate entities.

            • Prerequisite(s): GSM 5105 and GSM 5110
            • Enrollment cap: 35

            GSM 6286: Negotiation (3 credits)

            Provides experience negotiating: planning, evaluating and employing alternative strategies and tactics, and managing the process. Examines problems of competition and cooperation by using analytical frameworks such as theories of games, bargaining and coalitions.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
            • Enrollment cap: 32
            • Each student will be required to purchase assessment inventories and cases used in the course. Students should expect an additional cost of approximately $36.

            GSM 6289: The Business of Government (3 credits)

            Develops competencies in planning, negotiating and implementing programs by mobilizing staff and effectively using administrative processes. Covers topics such as continuous improvement, ethics, budgeting, program evaluation and related leadership skills. Emphasizes building trust with stakeholders and customers. Utilizes real situations and experiences. Applicable to management in public, nonprofit, and publicly-oriented business organizations. Prerequisite: Core/required courses of the first-year fall semester curriculum.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.
            • Enrollment cap: 30

            GSM 6290: Foreign Language Study (3 credits)

            Provides advanced language training through the University's foreign language courses numbered 33l, 332, or higher. Graded Pass/Fail. An Atkinson grade of "pass" requires a grade of "B" or better in the class. The instructor has the right to assess and confirm the capacity of the student to take the course, and may require MBA students to complete additional coursework not required of undergraduates. A maximum of six credits of GSM 690 may be applied toward elective credits, but the total number of Pass/Fail credits must be within the Atkinson School academic regulations governing Pass/Fail courses.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year fall semester.

            GSM 6291: Investments (3 credits)

            This course brings together financial and macroeconomic analysis to design and implement investment strategies in stocks and exchange traded funds. Topics include economic outlook, company analysis and valuation, analysis of risk, equity research, asset allocation, and a design of a custom performance benchmark. Together with GSM-6292A, this is a 6-credit finance experiential elective.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, permission of instructor, AND must be taken concurrently with GSM-6292A.
            • Enrollment cap: 20

            GSM 6292A: Student Investment Fund -- fall semester of year-long course (1.5 Credits Fall 2013; 3 Credits Beginning Fall 2014)

            This is a hands-on investment management course. Students follow economic, financial, and company events, and apply concepts and techniques from the GSM 6291 course and other courses to manage a real portfolio of stocks and exchange traded funds. At the end of the semester, students present their results and outlook to an outside panel.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, permission of instructor, AND must be taken concurrently with GSM 6291.
            • Enrollment cap: 20

            GSM 6292B: Student Investment Fund -- spring semester of year-long course (1.5 Credits Spring 2014; 3 Credits Beginning Spring 2015)

            Continuation of GSM 6292A. Students follow economic, financial, and company events and apply concepts and techniques from the GSM 6291, GSM 6292A, and other courses to manage a real portfolio of stocks and exchange traded funds. At the end of the semester, students present their results and outlook to an outside panel.

            • Prerequisite(s): GSM 6291 and 6292A
            • Enrollment cap: 20

            GSM 6293: Corporate Mergers, Acquisitions and Restructurings (3 credits)

            The course involves analysis of corporate mergers, acquisitions, and takeovers, in addition to a broad array of topics including strategic alliances, financial re-capitalization, Leveraged buyouts, Management buyouts, Going private, Going public, and ESOPs. The course aims at achieving learning outcome for the students in terms of their developing ability to plan, evaluate, and execute corporate restructuring activities using financial modeling and quantitative techniques. The course integrates the corporate governance and agency dimensions, financial and strategic management aspects, and legal and accounting considerations into a unified framework for investigating issues such as, pre-merger planning, fact-finding, accounting and tax implications, antitrust problems, post-merger integration, and short-term and long-term shareholder wealth consequences.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.
            • Enrollment cap: 40

            GSM 6294: Student Investment Fund (Summer session 3 credits)

            This is a hands-on investment management course that meets twice per week from early June until late July. Students follow economic, financial, and company events and apply concepts and techniques to manage a real portfolio of stocks and exchange traded funds. Less quantitative than GSM692 A&B, the summer Student Investment Fund utilizes a text written by a high-level investment manager to value companies and make decisions on stock purchases. Students may continue the Student Investment Fund experience with GSM 6292A (fall semester) and GSM 6292B (spring semester), which constitutes a year-long course.

            • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

            GSM-6295: Public Relations and Crisis Communication (3 credits)

            Explores the role of strategic PR and crisis communications in helping an organization increase awareness and preference, as well as build and maintain a positive reputation. Focus areas include: promoting products, services, events and executives; developing thought leadership in relevant areas; anticipating, preparing for and avoiding or lessening the impact of a crisis; and effectively managing communications if a crisis does occur. Building on analysis of PR/crisis communications successes and failures, interactive lectures and in-class exercises, students will apply their knowledge to develop a comprehensive PR and Crisis Communications Plan for a real business or organization.

              GSM 6296: Sustainability Management (3 credits)

              This course is structured as a prerequisite for many of the other courses recommended for the sustainability management area of interest. The overall purpose of this program is to create change agents who have the knowledge and skills to build and/or execute business processes to enhance the viability of the organization and the broader system in which it operates. As such this overview course is designed to provide everyone a base level for understanding the issues involved in becoming an effective change agent.

              • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum.

              GSM 7240: International Exchange Program - KEDGE (formerly known as Bordeaux School of Management) (12 credits)

              MBA study at Bordeaux School of Management in Bordeaux, France. Courses are taught in English. Students must apply to and be selected by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee to participate in an exchange program. The exchange program occurs during the fall semester of the second year of MBA study. The application and selection process takes place during spring semester of the first year of MBA study. GSM 7240 is graded Pass/No-Pass. Passing grades received from the exchange university will be recorded as "P" on the Atkinson School transcript for MBA students. Failing grades will be recorded as an "N" on the Atkinson School transcript. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail or Pass/No-Pass courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation. A maximum of 12 credits (24 ECTS credits from KEDGE) of exchange course work may be applied to elective credits from the KEDGE fall semester exchange. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation.

              • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, PLUS application and selection by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee.

              GSM 7241: International Exchange Program - Copenhagen Business School (15 credits)

              MBA study at Copenhagen Business School in Copenhagen, Denmark. Courses are taught in English. MBA students must apply to and be selected by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee to participate in an exchange program. The exchange program occurs during the fall semester of the second year of MBA study. The application and selection process takes place during spring semester of the first year of MBA study. GSM 7241 is graded Pass/No-Pass. Passing grades received from the exchange university will be recorded as "P" on the Atkinson School transcript for MBA students. Failing grades will be recorded as an "N" on the Atkinson School transcript. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail or Pass/No-Pass courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation. A maximum of 15 credits of exchange course work may be applied to elective credits. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation.

              • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, PLUS application and selection by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee.

              GSM 7242: International Exchange Program - EM Strasbourg School of Business (15 credits)

              MBA study at EM Strasbourg School of Business in Strasbourg, France. Courses are taught in English. MBA students must apply to and be selected by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee to participate in an exchange program. The exchange program occurs during the fall semester of the second year of MBA study. The application and selection process takes place during spring semester of the first year of MBA study. GSM 7242 is graded Pass/No-Pass. Passing grades received from the exchange university will be recorded as "P" on the Atkinson School transcript for MBA students. Failing grades will be recorded as an "N" on the Atkinson School transcript. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail or Pass/No-Pass courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation. A maximum of 15 credits of exchange course work may be applied to elective credits. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation.

              • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, PLUS application and selection by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee.

              GSM 7243: International Exchange Program - Copenhagen Business School (6 credits)

              MBA study at Copenhagen Business School in Copenhagen, Denmark. Courses are taught in English. MBA students must apply to and be selected by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee to participate in an exchange program. The exchange program occurs during the summer semester between the first and second year of MBA study. The application and selection process takes place during spring semester of the first year of MBA study. GSM 7243 is graded Pass/No-Pass. Passing grades received from the exchange university will be recorded as "P" on the Atkinson School transcript for MBA students. Failing grades will be recorded as an "N" on the Atkinson School transcript. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail or Pass/No-Pass courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation.

              • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, PLUS application and selection by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee.

              GSM 7244: International Exchange Program - EM Strasbourg School of Business (6 credits)

              MBA study at EM Strasbourg School of Business in Strasbourg, France. Courses are taught in English. MBA students must apply to and be selected by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee to participate in an exchange program. The exchange program occurs during the summer semester between the first and second year of MBA study. The application and selection process takes place during spring semester of the first year of MBA study. GSM 7244 is graded Pass/No-Pass. Passing grades received from the exchange university will be recorded as "P" on the Atkinson School transcript for MBA students. Failing grades will be recorded as an "N" on the Atkinson School transcript. Students should refer to academic regulations regarding the maximum number of credits from Pass/Fail or Pass/No-Pass courses, internship, independent study, research, foreign language study, waived credits and transfer credits that can be applied toward graduation.

              • Prerequisite(s): Core courses of the first-year curriculum, PLUS application and selection by the Atkinson School International Exchange Program Committee.

              GSM 7251: Internships for Management I (3 credits)

              This course is intended for students participating in their first semester of an internship with an employer. It provides students the opportunity to undertake professional level employment that applies and leverages AGSM core and elective courses and supports students’ career objectives while earning credits toward the MBA degree. Upon registering for GSM 7251 each student will be assigned a Faculty Internship Coordinator (FIC) by the Director of Career Management. Internship students will interact closely with their FIC who will serve as their advisor and mentor for the term with the goal of maximizing personal and professional development from the internship experience. The student may work with the FIC or other faculty when seeking specific technical advice such as finance, marketing, data analysis, etc. Coursework is designed to clarify goals, strategy, action steps, and metrics, to maximize integration of material, and to aid the student in communication of the implementation of their plan with the employer. The coursework includes a position plan, progress updates, mid-term paper, and final paper. A sampling of professional deliverables is required to be shared with the FIC. Students applying to register for Internship I must submit an internship proposal via Internwatch at http://agsm.willamette.edu/internwatch/ and complete an information meeting with the instructor. Students must demonstrate that the application and leverage of MBA level content will occur in depth. Important note for international students: U.S. law applies to students on an F1 or J1 visa. Please see the GSM-7251 course syllabus for a summary of considerations and contact Chris Andresen, WU's Associate Director of International Education, for complete details.

              • Prerequisite(s): Registration for Internship I requires official approval from the “Contributing Assistant Professor for Internships,” completion of at least 24 credits of the first-year curriculum, good standing and a cumulative Atkinson GPA of 3.00 or higher.

              GSM 7252: Internships for Management II (2 credits)

              Internship II is for students participating in their second semester of internship with an employer. Internship II is limited to students who successfully completed the requirements of Internship I. This course is intended for students participating in their second semester of an internship with the same employer as for their Internships for Management I course. It provides students the opportunity to undertake professional level employment that applies and leverages AGSM core and elective courses and supports students’ career objectives while earning credits toward the MBA degree. Upon registering for GSM 7252 each student will be assigned a Faculty Internship Coordinator (FIC) by the Director of Career Management. Internship students will interact closely with their FIC who will serve as their advisor and mentor for the term with the goal of maximizing personal and professional development from the internship experience. The student may work with the FIC or other faculty when seeking specific technical advice such as finance, marketing, data analysis, etc. Coursework is designed to clarify goals, strategy, action steps, and metrics, to maximize integration of material, and to aid the student in communication of the implementation of their plan with the employer. The coursework includes a position plan, progress updates, and final paper. A sampling of professional deliverables is required to be shared with the FIC. Students applying to register for Internship II must submit an internship proposal via Internwatch at http://agsm.willamette.edu/internwatch/ and complete an information meeting with the instructor. Students must demonstrate that the application and leverage of MBA level content will occur in depth. Important note for international students: U.S. law applies to students on an F1 or J1 visa. Please see the GSM-7251 course syllabus for a summary of considerations and contact Chris Andresen, WU's Associate Director of International Education, for complete details.

              • Prerequisite(s): Registration for Internship II requires official approval from the “Contributing Assistant Professor for Internships,” successful completion of Internship I, good standing and a cumulative Atkinson GPA of 3.00 or higher.

              GSM 7253: Internships for Management III (1 credit)

              Internship III is for students participating in their third semester of internship with an employer. Internship III is limited to students who successfully completed the requirements of Internship I and II. In general, students in Internship III will be continuing a significant project or assignment from Internship II, adding a new project or additional responsibilities to their Internship II experience, or working with a new supervisor or department. Internship III requires students to complete a significant work experience, write a position plan that describes how the student will continue to grow in their position, provide monthly updates to the “Contributing Assistant Professor for Internships and Projects,” write a final paper (an overview of what they have learned about the role of their function within the company, the company within the industry, and the industry within the economy), and participate in a final meeting with the “Contributing Assistant Professor for Internships and Projects.” Prerequisite: Registration for Internship III requires official approval from the “Contributing Assistant Professor for Internships and Projects,” successful completion of Internship II, good standing, and a cumulative Atkinson grade point average of 3.00 or higher. Students applying to register for Internship III must submit an internship proposal via Internwatch at http://agsm.willamette.edu/internwatch/ and complete an information meeting with the instructor. Students must demonstrate that the application and leverage of MBA level content will occur in depth. Important note for international students: strict rules apply for students on an F1 or J1 visa. Please see the GSM-7251 course syllabus for a summary of considerations and contact Chris Andresen, WU's Associate Director of International Education, for complete details.

              • Prerequisite(s): Registration for Internship III requires official approval from the “Contributing Assistant Professor for Internships,” successful completion of Internship II, good standing and a cumulative Atkinson GPA of 3.00 or higher.

              GSM 7261: Independent Study (1 - 3 credits)

              Student studies a topic, not available in regular course offerings, under the supervision of a faculty member. Typically includes reading the relevant literature and completing an evaluative project such as a written exam or paper. Specifics of the project, including credits earned, are determined by the student and professor. Course is graded Pass/Fail. A maximum of six credits from the group of courses of Internship (7251, 7253, 7254), Research 7262 and Independent Study 7261 may be applied toward elective credits, and the total number of Pass/Fail credits must be within the Atkinson School academic regulations governing Pass/Fail courses.

              • Prerequisite(s): Registration requires: core courses of the first-year curriculum, PLUS 3.0 cumulative Atkinson School GPA, PLUS supervision by a faculty member who is tenured or on a tenure track, PLUS completion of "GSM 7261 - Independent Study Form"

              GSM 7261G Global Study - Chile - Fall 2013 (1 credit)

              This is a one-credit course that includes an international study trip to Chile in December 2013. The trip includes visits to numerous companies and other organizations in Santiago and Valparaíso/Viña del Mar. In this course we study (i) fundamentals of international business, (ii) the environments and challenges of emerging markets, (iii) strategies and operations for succeeding in emerging markets, and (iv) specific aspects of business in Chile, the most significant emerging economy in Latin America. Chile is open for business. Per-capita income of about $18,000 makes Chile the highest-income and most significant emerging economy in Latin America. In partnership with business, the Chilean government developed a model admired worldwide for economic and social development. Smart government policies encourage foreign direct investment (FDI) and new business development. Chile enjoys some of the best living standards of emerging economies worldwide. Chile leads Latin America in economic freedom, competitiveness, sustainability, globalization, and low corruption. Chile’s credit rating (A+) is the best in Latin America. A world leader in global business, Chile has signed free trade agreements with China, the European Union, India, Japan, and the United States. The US is Chile’s top trading partner. Strongly entrepreneurial, Chile's approach to FDI is codified in its Foreign Investment Law and Startup Chile program (startupchile.org), which gives foreign investors the same status as Chileans. The government’s motto is “We change the world not by revolution, but by innovation.” Top Chilean exports include wine, salmon, and forestry products. Chile is a founding member of the United Nations and the only South American member of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Chile has a unique natural landscape, sandwiched between the Andes mountains and the Pacific Ocean. Celebrating its bicentennial in 2018, Chileans are extremely optimistic about their future.

              • Prerequisite(s): Requires: Successful completion of at least one semester of Willamette MBA course work, good academic standing, good conduct standing, and submission of the online class application.

              GSM-7261G Global Study - China - Spring 2014 (1 Credit)

              This is a one-credit course that includes an international study trip to China in March 2014. The trip includes visits to numerous companies and other organizations in Shanghai and Beijing. In this course we study (i) fundamentals of international business, (ii) the environments and challenges of emerging markets, (iii) strategies and operations for succeeding in emerging markets, and (iv) specific aspects of business in China. China is the most populous country, with 1.35 billion people, about 20 percent of the world. The country has evolved to superpower status in economic, military, and geopolitical terms. China is the world's second-largest economy and the biggest importer and exporter. In the past decade, China’s economy grew about seven times faster than that of the United States (316% versus 43%). The country’s $6,000 per-capita GDP implies that many Chinese remain in poverty. But China’s middle class now numbers some 300 million people (equivalent to US total population), most with incomes more than $15,000 per year. China's retail market is massive and growing rapidly. The country recently became the world’s largest market for automobiles, beer, and luxury goods. China is also an important destination for global sourcing and low-cost manufacturing. Rapid industrialization has brought unintended consequences, including considerable air and water pollution. China’s civilization dates back some 8,000 years. The Chinese invented printing, paper, gunpowder, the compass, and numerous other innovations. Mandarin Chinese is spoken by nearly 1 billion of China's people, more than any other language worldwide. Today, about 140,000 Chinese students study at US universities, the largest group of international students by far. In China, we will visit Beijing, the seat of national of government, and Shanghai, the center of business. Beijing is home to most of China's largest state-owned enterprises. Shanghai is a global financial center and the busiest port in the world.

              • Prerequisite(s): Requires: Successful completion of at least one semester of Willamette MBA course work, good academic standing, good conduct standing, and submission of the online class application.

              GSM 7262: Research (1 - 3 credits)

              Student develops research proposal, carries out proposed research, analyzes data and prepares a comprehensive research report under the supervision of a faculty member. Research outcomes should make a contribution to management, the discipline and/or career preparation. Specifics of the project, including credits earned, are determined by the student and professor. Course is graded Pass/Fail. A maximum of six credits from the group of courses of Internship (7251, 7253, 7254), Research 7262 and Independent Study 7261 may be applied toward elective credits, and the total number of Pass/Fail credits must be within the Atkinson School academic regulations governing Pass/Fail courses.

              • Prerequisite(s): Registration requires: core courses of the first-year curriculum, PLUS 3.0 cumulative Atkinson School GPA, PLUS supervision by a faculty member who is tenured or on a tenure track, PLUS completion of "GSM 751 - Research Form"