News

Student Docents to Show Off Maori Exhibition

In conjunction with its current exhibition "Toi Maori: The Eternal Thread," the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University will offer student-led exhibition tours through early December. Tours will be offered Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m. from Oct. 25 through Dec. 6, and on Saturdays beginning at 1 p.m. from Oct. 29 through Dec. 3, with the exception of the Thanksgiving weekend. Student docents have studied Maori art and culture for several months and worked closely with the Maori weavers when they were in residence at the museum.

"Toi Maori: The Eternal Thread" is a major exhibition of traditional and contemporary Maori weaving on loan from New Zealand collections. Included in the exhibition are superb examples of kakahu (high quality woven cloaks), whariki (woven floor mats), kete (finely woven baskets) and other exquisite woven pieces. The exhibition runs from Sept. 24 through Dec. 22 at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art and is the first time a major exhibition of Maori weaving has been presented in the United States.

Organized by the Pataka Museum of Arts and Culture in Porirua City, New Zealand, in partnership with Toi Maori Aotearoa-Maori Arts New Zealand, the exhibition is supported by a major grant from Te Waka Toi/Creative New Zealand. Additional funding was provided by the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde through their Spirit Mountain Community Fund, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Oregon Arts Commission and the City of Salem's Transient Occupancy Tax funds.

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art is located at 700 State Street (corner of State and Cottage Streets) in downtown Salem near the campus of Willamette University. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for seniors and students. Children under 12 are admitted free and Tuesday is an admission-free day. For further information please call 503-370-6855.

10-20-2005