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Joe Feddersen, Stealth, 2006, collection of Arlene and Harold Schnitzer. Photo by Frank Miller.Joe Feddersen, Stealth, 2006, collection of Arlene and Harold Schnitzer. Photo by Frank Miller.

Joe Feddersen, Okanagan II (detail), 2002, collection of the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art. Photo by Susan Seubert.Joe Feddersen, Okanagan II (detail), 2002, collection of the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art. Photo by Susan Seubert.

Joe Feddersen, Cul-de-Sac, 2002, collection of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Photo by Rebekah Johnson.Joe Feddersen, Cul-de-Sac, 2002, collection of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Photo by Rebekah Johnson.

    Hallie Ford Museum of Art Displays Work of Native American Artist

    Joe Feddersen: Vital Signs, a major retrospective exhibition for this highly regarded Native American artist, is on display Jan. 30-March 28 at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art.

    Organized by Willamette anthropology Professor Rebecca Dobkins, the exhibition will complete a two-year regional tour when it opens in Salem. The exhibition previously was shown at the Missoula Art Museum in Montana and the Tacoma Art Museum in Washington.

    The exhibition, which features prints, weaving and glass, includes more than 60 works Feddersen has created since 1996. The works are drawn from public and private collections throughout the U.S., including the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, among others.

    Feddersen, a member of the Confederated Colville Tribes, has exhibited his work extensively throughout the Pacific Northwest and nationally. He is a long-standing faculty member at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash.


    Vital Signs explores Feddersen's interest in the interrelationships between urban place markers and indigenous landscapes through powerful combinations of contemporary media and Native iconography.

    The exhibition is accompanied by a full-color, 128-page book with essays by Dobkins, artist Barbara Thomas and artist and writer Gail Tremblay. Co-published by the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the book is a major new volume in the Jacob Lawrence Series on American Art and Artists from University of Washington Press.

    Multiple events are scheduled at the museum in conjunction with the exhibition:

    • Presentation on Feddersen's life and career, Friday, Jan. 29, 5 p.m., Roger Hull Lecture Hall: Feddersen and Dobkins will engage in an informal conversation about the artist's work. Free.
    • Basket-weaving workshops, Saturday, Jan. 30: Feddersen and another Native American basket-weaver will offer two workshops for beginning and advanced weavers. Cost is $25 per person per workshop, and enrollment is limited to 10 in each class. To register, call 503-370-6855.
    • Teacher workshop, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 4 p.m.: Elizabeth Garrison, the Cameron Paulin Curator of Education, will present a workshop to help teachers prepare their students for a visit to the exhibit and broaden curriculum concepts back in the classroom. Admission is free; advance registration required at 503-370-6855.
    • Gallery talks, Tuesdays, Feb. 2-March 23, 12:30 p.m.: An ongoing series of 30-minute talks about the exhibition. Free.

    Joe Feddersen: Vital Signs is supported in part by the Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde through the Spirit Mountain Community Fund. Additional Support was provided by the National Museum of the American Indian's Visual and Expressive Arts Program and operating grants from the City of Salem and the Oregon Arts Commission.

    Location: Hallie Ford Museum of Art, 700 State St. (corner of State and Cottage streets), downtown Salem

    Hours: Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sundays, 1-5 p.m.; closed Mondays

    Admission: $3 for adults, $2 for seniors and students, free for children younger than 12, free for everyone on Tuesdays

    Information: 503-370-6855, www.willamette.edu/museum_of_art