Academic Programs

Course Descriptions

101 Civil Procedure

Introduction to the rules controlling the litigation of civil cases. Topics may include: survey of remedies, the distinction between legal and equitable remedies for purposes of right to jury; provisional remedies; Erie doctrine; jurisdiction, with emphasis on "long arm" jurisdiction; venue and process; claim and issue preclusion; parties to civil litigation, including necessary parties, third-party practice and class actions; pleading, discovery and motion practice under federal and state rules systems

  • Credit: 4 hours
  • Offering: Fall

103 Contracts I

Formation of informal and formal contracts; nature and duration of offer; acceptance; mutual assent; general principles of consideration; parol evidence; interpretation; constructive conditions and conditions precedent and subsequent; breach of contract; remedies for breach of contract; impossibility of performance; third party beneficiary; assignment; Statute of Frauds; discharge; accord and satisfaction; novation; illegal contracts. The development of contract law as a cultural institution reflective of general social and political trends. Consideration of the link between the humanities and extant contract law

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Fall

104 Contracts II

Formation of informal and formal contracts; nature and duration of offer; acceptance; mutual assent; general principles of consideration; parol evidence; interpretation; constructive conditions and conditions precedent and subsequent; breach of contract; remedies for breach of contract; impossibility of performance; third party beneficiary; assignment; Statute of Frauds; discharge; accord and satisfaction; novation; illegal contracts. The development of contract law as a cultural institution reflective of general social and political trends. Consideration of the link between the humanities and extant contract law

Prerequisite: Contracts I

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

105 Legal Research & Writing I

Fundamentals of legal analysis, research and writing, including analyzing and reasoning using statutes, court rules and judicial opinions, and communicating the legal analysis clearly and effectively to others in writing and in oral argument

  • Credit: 2 hours
  • Offering: Fall

106 Legal Research & Writing II

Fundamentals of legal analysis, research and writing, including analyzing and reasoning using statutes, court rules and judicial opinions, and communicating the legal analysis clearly and effectively to others in writing and in oral argument

Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I

  • Credit: 2 hours
  • Offering: Spring

108 Property

Law of possession; acquisition of title; estates and future interests in land; adverse possession; easements; servitude and covenants; landlord and tenant

  • Credit: 4 hours
  • Offering: Fall

109 Torts

This course examines the civil remedies available to compensate people who have been injured. The course focuses on actions for physical injury, and includes intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, products liability, damages, and wrongful death

  • Credit: 4 hours
  • Offering: Fall

111 Constitutional Law I

Construction and application of the United States Constitution; allocation of powers between the federal government and the states; allocation of powers among federal executive, Congress, and courts; due process

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

113 / 609 Negotiation I

This course offers an introduction to the most commonly practiced dispute resolution processes, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and litigation. The emphasis of the course is on theory, with a small percentage of time devoted to practice issues

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

114 Criminal Law

An overview of approaches among the states to the substantive criminal law, crimes and defenses. Includes historic common law distinctions, modern statutory modifications and the Model Penal Code

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Fall

115 Introduction to Business Law: Economics, Finance and Risk

This course introduces students to the study of business law. The focus is on law and economics, finance, risk analysis, and basic accounting. No prior knowledge assumed or needed

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

116 Lawmaking Process

This course reminds students that laws are made by political institutions organized for the purpose of lawmaking. The course is neither about politics nor the interpretive role of courts, but instead shows how the lawmaking process itself is governed by the law

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

117 / 316 International Law and Dispute Resolution

This course offers a survey of public international law and dispute resolution. Topics covered include the origins, nature, development, sources, and subjects of international law; recognition of states and governments; treaty interpretations; state and government succession; extradition; human rights; laws of armed conflict; the control of terrorism; the law of the sea; and international cultural heritage law

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

118 / 320 Comparative Law

A general introduction to the nature of law and legal institutions outside the United States and to the comparative method of studying law. The principal focus is on the civil law tradition in Europe, Latin America, and East Asia and on selected countries characteristic legal structures and processes. The importance of indigenous law traditions in Latin American and Asia may also be reviewed, as well as the American lawyers practical problems in pleading and proving foreign law.

  • Credit: 3 hours

150 Introduction to American Law

Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M, MBA and Master of Legal Studies Program students. The course provides an overview of various areas of American law, of the U.S. legal profession, and of the U.S. judicial process. It serves as an introduction to legal and ethical principles driving the U.S. legal system in the context of jurisprudence of American law and legal culture. Through close reading and critical discussion of cases and materials, the course will introduce students to effective use of legal resources and legal reasoning in the U.S. legal system. The course will also focus on introducing the students to reading and understand cases and statutes, doing legal research, and applying existing law to the issue at hand. Lastly, the course will include a section on professional ethics and culture of the law, including, settlement expectations of different dispute resolution mechanisms in the United States. Updated 04/2014.

Prerequisite: LLM, MLS, & MBA Students Only

  • Credit: 3 hours

151 Legal Research & Analysis

Legal Research & Analysis is a course designed for LL.M, MBA and Master of Legal Studies students. The course offers an introduction to legal analysis, research and writing. While legal research sources and techniques are a central component of the course, it is recognized that legal research must be studied in the context of the legal analysis and writing process. Therefore, students study and perform exercises in problem analysis, weight of authority, issue formulation, case law analysis, statutory interpretation, forms of legal reasoning and citation form. Students will conduct legal research based on a factual scenario, analyze the law and report the results of that research and analysis in writing. Updated 10/2014.

Prerequisite: LLM, MLS, & MBA Students Only

  • Credit: 2 hours
  • Offering: Spring

202 Business Organizations

Fundamentals of the various types of business organizations including general and limited partnerships, limited liability companies and partnerships, and corporations. Particular emphasis on closely held corporations and the rights, responsibilities and liabilities of business associates, including agency and fiduciary relationships.

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Fall and Spring

203 Corporate Finance

Capital structure and financing. Issuance of stock and payment of dividends. Provisions of the federal Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 on insider trading, fraud, and"tender offers"(take-over bids) of public-issue corporations.

Prerequisite: Business Organizations & Introduction to Business Law or instructor's consent

  • Credit: 3 hours

204 Remedies

This course examines the choices available to litigants who seek judicial remedies. Focus is on private remedies, including specific remedies (injunctions, specific performance, writs), declaratory judgments, and money judgments (tort and contract damages and restitution). Subtext of course reveals the interplay between specific and substitutionary relief.

  • Credit: 3 hours

205 Labor Law

Role of federal law in labor relations; historical development of labor law; union organization and recognition; duty to bargain collectively; strikes, picketing, and boycotts; administration and enforcement of the collective bargaining agreement.

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Taught in alternate years

206 Professional Responsibility

Consideration of the ethical problems in the practice of law, the legal constraints on the lawyer's professional conduct, the role of the lawyer in the legal profession and the place of the profession in society.

  • Credit: 2 hours
  • Offering: Fall and Spring

207 Federal Courts

The role of federal courts within the judicial system. Includes federal question and diversity jurisdiction; process and venue; removal of cases from state courts; conflict of federal and state jurisdiction; use of state law in federal courts.

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Taught in alternate years

208 Family Law

Survey of laws governing marriage and divorce. Includes jurisdiction; consequences; economic relations; alimony, support and separation agreements; status of the child; juvenile court proceedings as they affect child custody and the parent-child relationship.

  • Credit: 3 hours

209 Workers' Compensation

Historical development; the compensation principle; the employment relationship; relation of accident to employment; aggravation of injuries; industrial disease; the measure of compensation; rights of beneficiaries; third-party claims; Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA).

  • Credit: 2 hours

210 Admiralty

Admiralty jurisdiction of federal and state courts and substantive admiralty law. Students will examine whether a claim is governed by admiralty law, and what remedies and procedures admiralty law provides in personal injury and death of maritime workers, carriage of cargo, maritime liens, collision, salvage, limitation of liability and oil pollution.

  • Credit: 2 hours

211 Products Liability

Survey of the typical products liability lawsuit. Elements of the negligence, warranty and strict liability claims; defenses and damages available under each claim. Examination of policies underlying the various claims and proposed changes in state and federal law.

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

213 Evidence

Judicial notice; real and demonstrative evidence; direct and circumstantial evidence; witnesses; authentication; hearsay; burden of proof; presumption; relevance; privileges.

  • Credit: 4 hours
  • Offering: Fall and Spring

214 Real Estate Transactions

Contracts for sale of land, including remedies for breach. Security devices, including mortgages, trust deeds and land sale contracts. Real estate development, including subdivisions and condominiums.

  • Credit: 3 hours

215 Federal Income Tax

This course addresses the federal income taxation of individuals, including the determination of gross income, allowable deductions and the character of gain or loss. Nonrecognition and other common transactions are covered.

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

216 Legislation

Discovery and use of statutes and legislative materials, including federal, state and municipal legislation in representation and litigation before legislative bodies and the courts; interpretation of legislation; insight into the legislative process and its effect.

  • Credit: 3 hours

218 Insurance

Includes the history and development of insurance law, current principles of contract interpretation, as well as recent issues and developing trends in the fields of casualty, health, life and liability insurance. Close analysis of insurance contract language, critical thinking skills, and public policy analysis will be emphasized.

  • Credit: 2 hours

222 Land Use Planning

Overview of the traditional techniques of land use control including zoning, subdivision controls, planned unit developments and growth management controls. Consideration of the comprehensive plan as a limitation on administrative and political discretion in the decision-making process. Examination of the Due Process and Takings Clause jurisprudence of the Supreme Court with respect to land use regulation.

  • Credit: 3 hours

223 Environmental Law and Policy

Introduction to environmental law. Includes alternative approaches to the problems of environmental degradation, administrative regulation of pollution, and judicial supervision of that regulation.

  • Credit: 3 hours

224 International and Domestic Sports Law

This course covers three general and distinctive themes of international and domestic sports law: 1) the fundamentals of sports institutions, dispute resolution including the Court of Arbitration for Sport, and organizational models; 2) protection of competition and athletes, including issues of doping, gambling, technology, eligibility for competition, anti-discrimination law and policy, and protection of young athletes; and 3) commercial issues, including anti-trust aspects, media rights, intellectual property rights, image rights, event scholarship and players' agents. Updated 03/2014.

  • Credit: 3 hours

225 Employment Law

This course provides an in-depth examination of legal claims that arise in the workplace (except those related to employment discrimination). Topics include employment at will, judicial exceptions to the at will doctrine, hiring, privacy rights, and non-competition agreements. Federal overtime and minimum wage protections are explored as well. Finally the course considers mandatory arbitration as a means for resolving employment disputes. Updated 04/2014.

  • Credit: 3 hours

231 Civil Rights Litigation

Race, racism and American law. Included are construction and application of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution, the original civil rights statutes, and modern civil rights legislation. Emphasis on the law's successes and failures in addressing discrimination in housing, education, voting, public accommodations and interracial sex and marriage.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I and II

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: spring

233 Disability Law

This course examines the way in which modern disability laws are changing the cultural and physical landscape of our society. We will explore issues such as: disability discrimination and reasonable accommodation in the workplace, the obligation of government and private businesses to build accessible structures, and the obligation of schools to establish learning plans and make accommodations for their students with disabilities. Class lectures feature presentations by attorneys who are experts in their various fields of disability law.

  • Credit: 2 hours

234 Trusts and Estates

Basic estate planning and administration concepts. Emphasis on lifetime transfers, wills and will substitutes, trusts, drafting and construction of estate planning documents, and planning for minor and disabled family members, for old age, and for illness and death.

  • Credit: 4 hours
  • Offering: Fall and Spring

235 Community Property

Community property law, with primary emphasis on Washington community property law.

  • Credit: 2 hours

237 Native American Law

Statutory, judicial, and administrative material concerning American Indian tribes and individuals. Included are the historical development of Federal Indian policy; treaties; the trust relationship; tribal sovereignty; civil and criminal jurisdiction; natural resources of tribes; hunting and fishing rights; tribal self-government.

  • Credit: 3 hours

239 Arbitration: Theory and Practice

This course covers a variety of aspects of commercial and labor arbitration, includes agreements to arbitrate, judicial review of arbitration decisions and the enforceability of arbitration awards, analysis of both the federal and state arbitration acts, and review of federal and state court decisions relating to arbitration. The course will mostly emphasize doctrinal study and court decisions, but will also devote some time to practical skill-building.

  • Credit: 3 hours

242 Advanced Legal Research

Advanced Legal Research is a two-credit course designed to allow students to expand their legal research knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to compare the strengths and weaknesses of legal research sources and methods. Through in-class workshops, students will explore research sources and develop effective search techniques. Written assignments will require students to research legal issues, compiling relevant sources and synthesizing them into client and office communications. The emphasis will be on real-world, practice-oriented skills, to help prepare students for their careers in law. The course will cover the following topics: Secondary sources; state and federal statutes, state and federal legislative history; federal and state case law research; case citators; query formulation techniques; Oregon BarBooks (CLEs); trial practice materials; free legal research; specialty online resources— RIA, BNA and CCH; federal and state administrative law; and foreign and international law. To the extent practicable, assignment topics will reflect students’ individual interests. In working with state materials, emphasis will be on Oregon and other states in the region. Updated 10/2014.

Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II

  • Credit: 2 hours
  • Offering: Spring; Taught in alternate years

246 Sales

The law concerning sales of goods. Focus is on Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code and related commercial and consumer law. Topics include formation, interpretation, and enforcement of sales contracts; risk of loss; rejection and revocation of acceptance of goods; breach of warranty in commercial and consumer cases; buyers' and sellers' remedies; and issues concerning delivery of good title. Minor coverage is also given to Articles 2A (lease of goods), 5 (letters of credit), 7 (documents of title).

  • Credit: 2 hours

248 Health Care Law and Policy

The course considers selected topics related to health care in the United States, with particular focus on issues relating to the financing of health care services and access to such services.

  • Credit: 2 hours

249 Employment Law & Discrimination

This survey course examines the law governing the individual employment relationship. Both common law and statutory claims are examined as they relate to wages, hours, discrimination, and other conditions of employment. Updated 04/2014.

  • Credit: 3 hours

251 Advanced Torts

The course conducts in-depth examinations of products liability, intentional infliction of emotional distress, defamation, privacy, and economic torts both individually and within the context of the broader tort legal system. (Posted 10/2013.)

Prerequisite: 109

  • Credit: 2 hours

252 Constitutional Law II

Study of the following issues arising under the United States Constitution: freedom of expression and association; religion clauses (free exercise of religion; bar on establishment of religion); equal protection clause (suspect and semi-suspect classifications; fundamental rights); state action doctrine; and congressional enforcement of civil rights.

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Fall and Spring

255 Administrative Law (Sec 1)

Legal principles governing state and federal agencies. Particular emphasis is placed on the federal Administrative Procedure Act and judicial control of the administrative agencies.

  • Credit: 3 hours
  • Offering: Spring

255 Administrative Law (Sec 2)

Legal principles governing government agencies with emphasis on the federal Administrative Procedure Act. The small section is taught using problems; the professor evaluates student performance using a mid-term exam, final exam, group project, and class participation. Since the small section does not cover state administrative law, students cannot take it to meet the requirements for the Law & Government certificate.

  • Credit: 3 hours

257 Science, Technology and the Law

The course considers a range of relationships between scientific/technological developments and the law, addressing policy and doctrinal ramifications at the domestic and international (cross-jurisdictional) levels. Specific topics will vary from year-to-year, using a mix of issues to identify core characteristics and assess the appropriateness of various approaches to the interactions. Possible topics include: Internet intellectual property (music/video distribution, cybersquatting/metatags, business method patents); medical science (pharmaceutical patenting; regulation of stem cell research, abortion and right to die); privacy (consumer profiling, technological fencing and the right to read, 4th Amendment); jurisdiction/choice of law (conflicts on the global web, harmonization); scientific evidence; evolution as 1st amendment religion (creationism); regulating through scientific method (cost-benefit analysis) and technology forcing; e-commerce issues and antitrust regulation of innovation markets, R & D pooling and standard setting. Students can elect to either write a substantial paper or take a final exam. Papers of sufficient quality can be used to satisfy the 3rd year writing requirement. No scientific or technical background is necessary.

  • Credit: 2 hours

258 Trademarks and Unfair Competition Law

The course provides in-depth treatment of trademark and unfair competition law. Coverage includes adoption, registration and enforcement of marks, considering the common law and statutory basis for obtaining trademark rights (with emphasis on the federal Lanham Act, including the Trademark Law Revision Act of 1998 and the Federal Trademark Dilution Act of 1995); categories of marks (the scale of distinctiveness - descriptive, arbitrary, fanciful, geographical, etc.); important aspects of Patent and Trademark Office practice (advantages of federal registration, and how to proceed in opposition, cancellation and concurrent use proceedings); avoiding loss of rights (including abandonment and?naked?licensing); and infringement (the various tests for likelihood of confusion an applicable defenses and remedies). Also studied are jurisdictional problems and their resolution, key treaties for international protection (particularly the European Community Trademark System and the Madrid Protocol), recent Supreme Court cases, Internet domain name issues and unfair competition and related Federal Trade Commission actions.

  • Credit: 2 hours

259 Environmental Justice

This course prepares the student for mid-level environmental management and decision making in community, governmental, and industrial employment venues. Topics include public involvement and participation in land use and environmental decisions; the US history of the Environmental Justice movement; Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act; concepts of Risk; Sustainability and Environmental Justice; and the role of communities in environmental decision making. This course also teaches about the law and history of Environmental Justice in the modern day, real world context of public and private environmental decisions.

  • Credit: 2 hours

260 Copyright

This a comprehensive introduction to U.S. copyright law, and begins with an analysis of copyright?s underlying policies and theoretical framework. It then examines the substantive and formal requirements for copyright protection, the exclusive rights (reproduction, adaptation, etc.) accorded to authors and copyright proprietors, the fair use defense, issues involving copyright ownership, renewal, duration, transfer and termination of transfers, moral rights, possible Constitutional limitations to copyright holder rights, contributory and vicarious liability (focusing on music file trading and peer-to-peer services like Napster, Kazaa and Grokster), and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

  • Credit: 3 hours

261 Mass Tort Litigation

This course examines procedural and substantive law issues in civil actions arising from actions or products causing harm to large numbers of people. Topics include product liability such as breast implant and tobacco litigation, and mass disasters such as chemical plant explosions and airplane crashes.

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure; Torts

  • Credit: 3 hours

262 Selected Topics in Sports Law

This course considers economic and other perspectives on sports law topics, including sports betting, salary structure, league rules, tournament sports, collective bargaining agreements, drug use and testing, sports violence, and other prominent and contemporary sports law issues.

  • Credit: 3 hours

263 Animal Law

An exploration and discussion of the treatment of animals under state, federal, and constitutional law. The course will address the historical status of animals in the law; legislative efforts and citizen initiatives to strengthen animal protection laws; the application of federal laws concerning captive, wild and farm animals; and comparative animal protection laws; the limitations on state laws addressing anti-cruelty, hunting, trapping, and animal fighting; the emerging areas of veterinary malpractice and other animal-related torts; the use of consumer protection statutes to address animal welfare concerns; the effect of free speech, religious expression, and other Constitutional principles on animal protection statutes; legal constraints on animal advocacy such as libel and defamation; and the movement to obtain legal recognition of the rights of animals.

  • Credit: 2 hours

264 Selected Issues in Consumer Law: Marketing and Advertising

This seminar will survey the laws applicable to the advertising and marketing. Expected topics include the advertising/editorial content distinction, false advertising law, deception, business torts, brand protection, and privacy. Students will write a research paper and make an in-class presentation to satisfy the requirements of the course. Updated 07/2014.

Prerequisite: 2


    265 Crimes Without Borders: Transnational and International Criminal Law and Procedure

    This course seeks to introduce students to criminal law that extends beyond our borders. We will discuss conduct that is criminal under international law, such as genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. These crimes, which the casebook authors call “international crimes,” are often prosecuted in international or quasi-international courts. We will also discuss crimes that are international or, as the casebook authors would say, “transnational,” in that domestic criminal law is applied to conduct across borders. Examples of such transnational crimes are money laundering, corruption, torture, terrorism and trafficking. There is some overlap between these two areas. In addition to exploring the substance of these international and transnational crimes, we will examine the procedural and practical challenges of international and transnational criminal law, including acquiring evidence abroad, issues of immunity, the application of the United States Constitution abroad and the like. Grades in the course will be determined through a take home final examination.

    • Credit: 3 hours
    • Offering: Spring

    266 Election Law

    This course is devoted to surveying the constitutional and statutory provisions regulating the conduct of democratic elections in the United States. Issues to be discussed include the right to vote, ballot access restrictions, the regulation of political parties, reapportionment and redistricting; partisan gerrymandering, campaign financing, the Voting Rights Act, and special issues arising in the context of direct democracy (i.e., ballot initiatives and referenda).

    • Credit: 3 hours
    • Offering: Spring

    267 Tax-Exempt Organizations

    This course will focus primarily on the federal law requirements for an organization to qualify for and maintain tax-exempt status under Section 501(c)(3). The course will begin by looking at the formation of a nonprofit organization and application for tax-exempt status, then move into common operational issues such as lobbying and political activity, private benefit and private inurement and the unrelated business income tax (UBIT). Updated 10/2014.

    Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax recommended

    • Credit: 3 hours

    268 Healthcare Law: The Affordable Care Act

    This class will focus on the development of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Reconciliation Act of 2010, and the impact this legislation has upon delivery and reimbursement models in heal care. Updated 10/2013.

    Prerequisite: Health Care Law & Policy recommended

    • Credit: 2 hours

    269 Latinos and the Law

    This is an advanced course that facilitates an understanding of how law and public policy affect the economic livelihood and rights of the Latino community, particularly with respect to immigration, language, and racial and ethnic discrimination in a variety of contexts, including employment, housing, hate crimes, education, public benefits, and the criminal justice system. This course also examines concepts of equality and discrimination as interpreted in other countries from the perspective of comparative law. Finally, the course will give the students some exposure to Spanish translation of fundamental legal terminology. Updated 04/2014.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    270 Medical Malpractice

    Some 75,000 hospital patients die each year because of negligence. Just in the past month, a hospital in Texas mistakenly discharged a patient who subsequently developed Ebola. Many hundreds of people were placed on movement restricts and two health care workers who cared for the patient subsequently contracted the disease. Why do mistakes like this occur and what are we doing to prevent medical errors? The healthcare industry has become perhaps the most regulated in the United States. As clinicians, hospitals, medical device manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies and other players respond to this regulatory environment, the health law field has become a dynamic and complex area. And it is one evidencing a marked growth in legal employment. Indeed, health law has become such a specialized area that some state bars have developed board certification programs in healthcare. This class is unified around two main themes: (1) legal mechanisms to assure medical quality and (2) legal mechanisms to protect and promote patient autonomy. Among the many areas we will examine some of the most interesting include: - why medical malpractice occurs; - what the health care industry is doing to improve patient safety; - how licensure and credentialing process failures can lead to significant patient injuries; - the elements of a malpractice claim and corresponding defenses; - why apology and early offers to pay are bringing about huge changes in our compensation system; - the discovery, trial and settlement processes; - how liability insurance works; - the impact of litigation on clinicians. Updated 10/2014.

    • Credit: 2 hours
    • Offering: Spring; Taught in alternate years

    271 Entrepreneurship and the Law

    The course will provide students with an introduction and overview of serving as legal counsel for entrepreneurs, start-ups and investors in today’s fast paced economy. We will explore a number of basic issues including entity structuring, building the management team, raising outside capital, valuation, execution of the business plan and preparing/completing an exit. Students will have the opportunity to learn from seasoned attorneys, entrepreneurs and investors. Updated 10/2014.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations

    • Credit: 2 hours
    • Offering: Spring; Taught in alternate years.

    273 Employee Benefits

    This course is intended to provide students with a more detailed look at common types of employee benefit plans and the rules that govern them. This first part of the course focuses on qualified pension plans—both defined benefit plans and defined contribution plans such as 401(k) plans, which have gained popularity in recent years. The second part of the course turns to deferred compensation plans that do not meet the requirements of ERISA (“nonqualified” plans), to equity compensation, and to other types of health and welfare benefit plans commonly sponsored by employers. Updated 10/2014.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations

    • Credit: 3 hours

    274 Aviation Law

    This course is intended as an introduction to aviation law. The course will cover the basic legal framework of aviation law including the regulation of aircraft, airmen, domestic and foreign air carriers, and airports. The course will also cover the legal protections provided to passengers and aircraft crash investigations and litigation. Finally, the course will discuss the future of aviation including NextGen and unmanned aerial systems. Students will write a research paper and make an in-class presentation to satisfy the requirements of the course. Updated 10/2014.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    303 Debtor and Creditor

    Emphasis on bankruptcy under the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978, including liquidation and debtor rehabilitation. Other matters affecting debtor-creditor relations, including judgment liens, executions, attachments, garnishments, fraudulent conveyances and exemptions. Suggested pre-requisite: Secured Transactions

    • Credit: 3 hours
    • Offering: Spring

    304 State and Local Government Law

    Considers the sources of local government power, the legal relations between local governments and other governmental entities, and local governments' relations with individuals.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    308 Federal Estate and Gift Tax

    Federal tax treatment of the transfer of property by lifetime gift or at death. A series of problems apply the tax laws to specific fact situations. Includes comprehensive review problem requiring preparation of tax returns for hypothetical client. Introduces basic principles of estate planning for taxable estates.

    Prerequisite: Trusts and Estates

    • Credit: 2 hours

    309 Securities Regulation

    This course examines the regulation of securities offerings and trading under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. It explores offerings and the registration process under the Securities Act, along with reporting requirements under the Exchange Act. The course will also cover fraud, insider trading, and civil liabilities under both Acts. Finally, the course will touch upon selected recent developments in securities regulation. Updated 11/2013.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations

    • Credit: 3 hours

    313 Conflict of Laws

    Problems arising when significant aspects of a dispute transcend a single state or country. Topics include choice of law; constitutional and international legal limitations on the competence of state courts; jurisdiction; change of venue and forum non conveniens; enforcement of judgments; related issues of marriage, divorce, custody and support; and American Indian conflicts.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    314 Antitrust Laws

    Antitrust policy under Sherman, Clayton and Federal Trade Commission Acts. Collaboration in pricing and market-sharing agreements; trade association activities; resale price maintenance; dealer franchises; exclusive dealing; monopolization; mergers and other integrations.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    315 Intellectual Property

    Fundamentals of intellectual property law including trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and patents.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    318 International Business Transactions

    Public and private aspects of international trade, licensing, and investment. Topics include international documentary transactions; letters of credit; exchange controls; NAFTA and the WTO; tariffs; trade barriers and preferences; duties; import and export controls, trade with non-market economies, ethical issues and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act; international enforcement of intellectual property rights; foreign investment; double taxation; the European Union; repatriation of overseas profits; and expropriation.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    321 Civil Trial Practice

    The goal of this course is to develop each student's courtroom advocacy skills so that he or she can try a real case which has some complications. Each week a particular skill will be addressed in a 1 hour lecture. Then students will prepare and perform the skill in a 3 hour practical skills session with each performance being critiqued. The final is a pretrial conference and a 6 hour mock trial. (Posted 10/2013.)

    Prerequisite: 213

    • Credit: 4 hours

    325 Juvenile Law

    Legal rights and status of children. Rights regarding economic activity, family, school, health care and sexuality. Analysis of key bases for juvenile court jurisdiction: abuse/neglect; status offenses; and crimes. Due process rights in police, court and agency procedures. Issues raised by placement in foster care, juvenile detention facilities, adult jails, and state training schools. Additional rights of special population children: poor, handicapped, migrant, Native American. Students will write a research paper to satisfy requirements for the course.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    333 School Law

    This course is designed with an emphasis on the role of the school law attorney and covers federal and state constitutional law, statutory law, and state and local rules and regulations as applied in the school and education setting. Though there is some discussion of higher education, private schools, and home schooling, the course focuses primarily on government regulation of public elementary and secondary education and the various individual and institutional rights and responsibilities. This includes students’ rights regarding privacy, search and seizure, free speech, and access to education; teachers’ rights and responsibilities, particularly with respect to employment and discipline, the duty to supervise, and academic freedom; the responsibilities and powers of the state and local school districts, including torts, zoning, and eminent domain; the intersection of state, federal, and local rights and control of education; race, gender, and disability discrimination; law and religion in the school setting; and the unique position of the school, a governmental entity often operating from a quasi-in loco parentis position to hundreds of students. Updated 03/2014.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    334 Criminal Procedure I

    Criminal process from crime to trial. Emphasis upon recent constitutional law cases and current problems: arrest; search and seizure; police questioning; identification; initial appearance; preliminary hearing and release decision; complaint; indictment and information; discovery and disclosure; free press and fair trial; exclusionary rule applications; and plea negotiation.

    • Credit: 3 hours
    • Offering: Fall

    337 Secured Transactions

    The law concerning secured transactions in personal property and fixtures (Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code). Topics include the scope of UCC Article 9, creation and perfection of security interests, priorities of claimants to collateral, and default and enforcement procedures. Emphasis is placed on the study of the interrelationship of UCC Article 9 and bankruptcy law.

    • Credit: 3 hours
    • Offering: Fall

    338 Payment Systems

    The law concerning negotiable instruments, bank deposits and collections (Articles 3 and 4 of the Uniform Commercial Code). Topics include the scope of UCC Articles 3 and 4, negotiation, liability associated with negotiable instruments, holders in due course, the bank collection process, and forgery and alteration. The Expedited Funds Availability Act and Federal Reserve Regulations CC and J, electronic fund transfer systems law, credit card law, and UCC Article 4A (wire transfers) also will be considered.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    339 Employment Discrimination

    This course focuses on workplace claims involving employment discrimination and harassment. State and federal laws prohibiting discrimination based on race, sex, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, and disability are explored. Topics include disparate treatment, disparate impact, harassment, bona fide occupational qualifications, and the business necessity defense. Updated 04/2014.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    340 Anglo-American Legal History

    Most American law and legal institutions have deep historical roots. Whether one becomes a practicing lawyer, legislator or government policy maker, she will want to understand how and why the legal system grew in order to be able to defend the status quo or to propose how and why it should be changed. This course is an introduction to characteristic features of the common law. Depending on the course book selected, topics may include popular sovereignty, republicanism, federalism, judicial law making, slavery, women and the family, labor law, legal science, trial by jury, civil and criminal procedure, legal education, or the legal professions.

    • Credit: 3 hours
    • Offering: Spring; Taught in alternate years

    347 Gaming Law

    Vice law. Course will focus on gambling, including prohibitions, regulations, Native casinos, offshore bookmakers, UIGEA. Course studies anti-speculation rules, including limits on futures trading, prediction markets, and betting exchanges. Sports and non-sports betting included.

    • Credit: 2 hours
    • Offering: Taught in alternate years

    348 Sustainable Natural Resources Law

    This course introduces you at a sophisticated level to natural resources law and policy. We first develop an overall framework for understanding the vast array of natural resources subfields -- explicitly considering the substantive goals of the law, the means that may be chosen to implement the substantive goals, how we allocate the power to choose those goals and means, and the processes used to make such decisions. Our framework includes a consideration of the role of law, policy, economics and technical expertise. Next we explore how environmental and natural resources law and policy approaches the problem of nature conservation, sometimes referred to as protecting biodiversity. Then, we examine how environmental and natural resources law structures management of economic resources (e.g. water, fisheries, mineral resources) as well as significant legal doctrines that affect both biodiversity conservation and economic resource utilization (e.g. the public trust doctrine and constitutional takings doctrine).

    • Credit: 3 hours

    349 Mergers and Acquisitions

    The course introduces students to the structure, negotiation, and documentation of corporate mergers and acquisitions. Topics covered include basic acquisition structures, fiduciary duties of directors and officers, deal flow and the role of counsel in a transaction, successor liability, due diligence, shareholder appraisal rights, takeover defense mechanisms, risk allocation, and negotiation and documentation of the transaction. The final paper is a client memorandum addressed to a director of the target company from an actual deal that the student selects from the SEC's database of public company deals. This 2-credit course does not emphasize tax or securities aspects of corporate mergers and acquisitions. Updated 10/2014.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations, Corporate Finance

    • Credit: 2 hours

    350 Immigration Law

    The administrative structure and substantive legal doctrine of immigration law, including the bases for permanent resident alien and non-immigration status; exclusion and deportation, and the international law of immigration; constitutional constraints on the Immigration and Naturalization Service and other governmental agencies; the rights of undocumented aliens, refugees and asylees; and employment rights of aliens.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    352 Elder Law

    Estate planning for the elderly client. Topics covered include an introduction to the aging population and the aging process, delivery of services to the elderly, ethical issues, income maintenance programs (Social Security, Disability and Supplemental Security Income), health care entitlement programs (Medicare and Medicaid), nursing homes and other residential alternatives, guardianships and conservatorships, planning techniques for long-term health care, and health care decision-making. Writing component includes reports on field activities, interview with a "client" and drafting an advice letter, and drafting of guardianship and conservatorship pleadings. Class meets once a week on "flex time" schedule, not exceeding 3 hours for any one session.

    Prerequisite: Trusts & Estates

    • Credit: 2 hours

    354 Patent Law and Policy

    The students will learn the fundamentals of U.S. patent law, patent practice, and the governing policy concerns. The course will concentrate on the practical rather than the theoretical, without being of interest solely to technically trained future patent practitioners. The professor will teach by lecture and demonstration with significant student classroom participation. A science or engineering background is preferable but not required.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    355 State Constitutional Law

    State constitutions differ from the United States Constitution and among themselves. The course examines these differences, and how courts and lawyers deal with provisions that do and others that do not parallel federal provisions.

    Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I

    • Credit: 2 hours

    356 Water Law

    This course emphasizes basic water law for the lawyer-practitioner, focused on quantitative water law, including state allocation and regulation of water, public interest in water use, and the public trust doctrine. Course content will mesh with other natural resource, property and administrative law courses, providing a practical background of how water rights relate to property ownership, land use planning, real estate transactions, and natural resource regulation.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    358 Comparative Constitutional Law

    Examination of recurring constitutional issues by review of legal scholarship and by comparing the constitutions and judicial interpretations of other countries. Considers topics among the following: comparative protections of civil, political and other human rights including freedom of speech and religion and the protection of religious and ethnic minorities; structural issues such as federalism, separation of powers, and the role of the judiciary; and the distinguishing features of socialist constitutions. Coverage includes examination of selected developments in Canada, Latin America, and Southern Africa. Students will make class presentations and write a paper.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    359 Selected Problems in International Law

    This course will examine a range of current issues at the intersections of the environmental and cultural heritage, human rights, international economics and sovereignty. The class will also consider international legal aspects of any late-breaking events that merit attention.

    Prerequisite: International Law and Dispute Resolution

    • Credit: 2 hours

    360 Business Entities Tax

    This course will focus on the issues facing the owner of a business at three stages during its life: creation, operation and liquidation. The course will emphasize choice of entity issues, comparing and contrasting the various forms of business enterprise. It will also cover the basics of both partnership taxation (which is also the treatment of LLCs and LLPs) and corporations (including S Corporations).

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations & Federal Income Tax or instructor's consent.

    • Credit: 4 hours

    361 Advanced Topics in Conflict and Dispute Resolution

    This research seminar offers students exposure to various perspectives on and approaches to conflict and dispute resolution. These may include approaches from economics, psychology, anthropology, sociology, and political science as well as from law. They may also involve perspectives from comparative and international law. A research paper is required.

    • Credit: 2 Hours hours
    • Offering: Fall

    363 International Environmental Law & Policy

    This course will help you understand the complex network of laws, policies and institutions that make up the field of international environmental law and policy. As we progress through the materials, we will focus on topics central to international environmental law, including transboundary cooperation, state sovereignty and environmental limitations versus economic development. In part one of the course, we look at global, regional and local environmental challenges. We consider the three landmark conferences on environment and development, the making of international environmental law and principles shaping this field. In part two, we concentrate on international environmental protection. Our discussion will cover climate change, oceans and seas, freshwater resources, wildlife conservation and the protection of habitat. In part three, we discuss environmental protection and international finance, as well as corporate social responsibility.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    365 Latin American Law and Legal Institutions

    Semester program in Quito, Ecuador at the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador. Fundamentals of the civil code, Ecuadorian procedural and substantive law, and Latin American legal institutions. Limit of two students. Requires approval of each participant by the Dean and the American Bar Association.

    Prerequisite: Spanish proficiency

    • Credit: Up to 10 hours

    366 Will and Trust Drafting

    This course builds the skills needed to draft estate planning documents for clients who require primarily non-tax planning. The semester begins with required computer exercises covering grammar and document organization, which allow each student to tailor lessons to areas needing improvement. Students then apply these basic skills to draft both portions of and entire estate planning documents, such as wills, trusts for minors, durable powers of attorney, advance medical directives, revocable living trusts, and client letters. On some exercises, students will critique each other’s drafts. Students also will receive ample feedback from the professor about their performance, together with specific suggestions for improvement. Class meets once a week for two hours and satisfies the practical skills writing requirement.

    Prerequisite: Trusts & Estates

    • Credit: 2 hours
    • Offering: Spring

    367 Business Planning

    The course is designed to help students understand and address the core legal and tax considerations confronting business owners from startup and funding, to operations, conversions and transitions, through liquidation and dissolution. Topics include corporate, partnership, and LLC taxation issues; choice of entity planning; entity conversions and transitions; profit distribution planning and diversification; and business exit planning.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations, Federal Income Tax

    • Credit: 2 hours

    372 International Litigation and Arbitration

    The course is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the institutions, processes, rules, and policies that shape litigation and arbitration arising out of transnational disputes.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    373 Human Rights

    This course is a survey of international human rights norms and their implementation. The course will include consideration of the historical and ideological origins of the human rights movement, issues of universality versus cultural relativism, and alternative ideological conceptions. The course will survey the basic international and regional human rights agreements and instruments and their enforcement mechanisms. It will consider the status of second and third generation rights, group rights, and collective rights. The course will also examine remedies for human rights violations and the substantive elaboration of selected specific human rights. Updated 11/2014.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    374 Pre-Trial Civil Litigation

    A study of the planning, investigation, pleading and discovery lawyers engage in prior to trial and the skills, tactics and strategies necessary to effectively prepare to try a case.

    • Credit: 3 hours

    375 Wildlife Law

    This seminar course in roundtable discussion format explores how different subject areas of law fit together to resolve some of the most intriguing problems that arise in natural resource law. Wildlife Law will cover: common law underpinnings of protection of wildlife; who “owns” wildlife as property (private vs. public); how to manage our remaining natural resources held in common, such as fisheries; wolf management; conservation, including game and habitat protection; perceived conflicts with animal law principles; intersection with water law and other regulatory systems; constitutional and administrative law aspects; biodiversity in the law, with special emphasis on the federal Endangered Species Act and its Oregon counterpart; and inter-sovereign relations (state, federal, tribal, international). One written paper on an assigned topic will be required in lieu of a final exam. Updated 11/2013.

    • Credit: 2 hours

    378 German Law and Legal Institutions

    Program in International and Comparative Business Law at Bucerius Law School in Hamburg, Germany.


      379 Business Lawyering

      The course applies problem-solving across the range of traditional marketing business decisions: defining product/service offerings, distribution decisions, developing and implementing communication strategies and pricing decisions. The course focuses on a series of case studies, each integrating a specific business fact pattern with related substantive legal materials. Students prepare a client memorandum for each case, offering advice on the appropriate business and legal responses to the particular situation. The course is designed so that, although helpful, Business Lawyering - Policy and Process is not a prerequisite.

      • Credit: 3 hours

      380 Selected Issues in Securities Regulation and Corporate Governance

      The seminar will cover such issues as developments in the law of insider trading and the disclosure of inside information; the role of gatekeepers of public companies post-Enron (e.g., lawyers, accountants, managers, audit committees and boards of directors); the application of antitrust laws to regulated securities entities (e.g., exchanges); the effect and policies involved in the globalization of securities markets and the planned merger of U.S. and European exchanges; the role and regulation of hedge funds; and current scandals and frauds.

      • Credit: 3 hours

      381 First Amendment

      This seminar will address various topics in First Amendment law involving free speech, assembly, association, press, religious exercise and nonestablishment issues. The Seminar will consider the value and contribution of various forms of expression to our diverse democracy and th rationales for its regulation: e.g., artistic speech; hate speech; religious speech; subsidized speech; compelled speech. Classes will also focus on tensions between rights of access and of private association, religious accommodation versus religious discrimination, and public funding of religious institutions within the context of private schools and faith based charitable organizations. Class evaluation will be through a research paper of approximately 20 pages and class participation. A limited number of students will satisfy their third-year writing requirement.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      382 U.S. Supreme Court: Current Constitutional Issues

      This seminar focuses on the structure and processes of governmental decision-making, particularly in executive and administrative agencies. The course examines cases currently pending before the U.S. Supreme Court touching upon administrative structure and process. In addition, the course examines the constitutional and statutory provisions requiring both transparency and accountability in agency decision-making. For example, to what extent must agency policy deliberations be made public? Is confidentiality desirable? Under what circumstances? To illuminate divergent approaches to these questions, the course also examines statutes and decisions regarding state administrative law. Updated 04/2012.

      Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I

      • Credit: 2 hours

      383 European Union Law

      An introduction to European legal integration and its institutional evolution through the era of the European Community and the European Union. This course examines the relevant treaties and legal institutions involved with legislative, executive, and judicial processes, as well as the EUs federal or supranational relationship with its member states. In introducing the common market, we emphasize the free movement of persons and workers including the rights of practice for lawyers. finally we survey specific Community policies concerning equality, social rights, the environment, consumers, civil litigation, and external relations.

      • Credit: 3 hours

      384 Oregon Administrative Law

      Oregon is typical in that state regulation extends into most commercial activities, and hence obtaining state authorizations and avoiding violation of regulatory requirements is a significant component of law practice for corporate, nonprofit and private counsel. Oregon's many unique requirements for rulemaking and its idiosyncratic provisions that govern contested cases in administrative tribunals, and non-contested cases litigated in circuit court, provide particular procedural challenges for the practicing Oregon lawyer. Oregon Administrative Law covers the Oregon approach to agency authority and functions, administrative rules, contested cases, orders in other than contested cases, extraordinary remedies, civil penalties and cease-and-desist orders, and judicial review of administrative decisions. Also covered are Oregon's versions of the public records law and the public meetings act, and the Oregon Attorney General's opinions and model rules. This course will provide a solid foundation for the practicing lawyer in Oregon administrative law, a subject that is not infrequently tested in the essay portion of the Oregon Bar Exam.

      Prerequisite: Administrative Law recommended

      • Credit: 3 hours

      385 Selected Topics in Constitutional Law & Legal History

      A Constitutional History of the Civil War (Law 385; Hist. 450). This seminar will consider the causes and ramifications of the American Civil War from a constitutional perspective. It will trace those constitutional structures (e.g., federalism; slavery provisions) and subsequent events and cases (e.g., the secession crisis; Dred Scott) that precipitated the political and constitutional crisis of the Civil War. It will consider Lincoln's interpretation of the Constitution and his various legal policies (emancipation; suspension of habeas corpus; property confiscation; military tribunals). It will then consider creation and application of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments and their subsequent interpretation and enforcement (e.g., Jim Crow laws; Plessy), concluding with the rise of the civil rights movement and Brown v. Board of Education. The course will not consider civil war battles. Student will write a short review of a book, a short critique of a classmate’s paper, and write and present a final paper on a related topic of their choosing. Updated 10/2013.

      • Credit: 3 hours
      • Offering: Spring

      386 Global Sustainability

      This course examines the philosophy and practice of sustainability and follows the subsequent development of this approach in resolving post industrial problems. After a brief introduction to ecological ethics and thinking, we begin with its origins in the public international law of environmental protection. Through the analytical lenses of risk analysis, economics, land use law and social sciences, we examine how sustainability can engage and resolve complex, post industrial problems through law and the work of lawyers. Throughout the course, we consider how law can engage solutions, and the role of lawyers in implementing sustainable approaches through law and other social forums.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      387 Energy & Climate Law

      Traditional energy law includes private law, price regulation, and other regulatory laws that govern extraction, storage, transportation, and refining of energy minerals (coal, oil, gas, uranium), electrical power generation and distribution, natural gas production and distribution, hydroelectric and nuclear licensing and energy use in industrial and transportation sectors. The class will cover those subjects; however this is not your grandmothers energy law class. The present and future of energy law is changing rapidly, perhaps faster than any other area of law. Energy lawyers cannot simply rely on well-defined bodies of law regarding oil and gas leases, unitization agreements, state public utility regulation, surface coal reclamation, rights-of-way over federal land, and FERC hydroelectric licenses to answer client questions, make convincing legal arguments, and assist their clients in deals. They must understand complex institutional relationships, be able to deal in a fluid legal and policy environment,and have the ability to fluently articulate client interests in terms of public policy goals and regulatory rationales such as economic efficiency, sustainability, supply security, universal affordable access, recapturing unearned monopoly profits, and maintaining ecosystem services. Finally, to avoid themselves becoming fossilized organic matter, energy lawyers must understand the forces driving energy law in the 21st century; rapid scientific and technological advances; geopolitical power shifts and terrorism; the global carbon cycle, global warming, effects of regional climate change, and adaptation; the peak oil debate and other aspects of resource supply dynamics; liberalization and deregulation of energy markets; globalization and multinational corporate behavior; corporate social responsibility, shifting investor expectations and global financier demands; international commitments to alleviate extreme poverty and increasingly dynamic economic growth in India, China, and other major energy markets. The class is designed to prepare those who are consider a practice related to energy law, environmental law or natural resources law as well as providing essential background on critical energy issues for all lawyers.

      • Credit: 3 hours

      388 Sexuality & Discrimination

      This course will explore the contemporary legal, social, medical, and psychological issues of sexuality, both from a domestic legal perspective as well as from international vantage points. The focus of the course will be on discrimination based on sexual orientation, considering contexts of employment, family law, education, housing, and immigration. There will also be an exploration of the civil rights of people with AIDS, and the discrimination that attends it in the same contexts as well as in the availability of insurance and medical and dental treatment. Finally, the course will look at the phenomenon of discrimination with respect to pregnancy and related issues. A substantial writing project will be required, and evaluation will be partially based on contribution to class discussion.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      389 Advanced Topics in Criminal Law: Sentencing Reform & Policy

      This seminar explores the modern sentencing reform movement. Topics include the origins and critiques of the traditional sentencing system, the philosophical and policy bases for limiting judicial discretion in sentencing laws, sentencing guidelines and commissions, alternatives to incarceration, organizational sentencing, capital punishment, and the impact of race and gender on sentencing. The seminar compares federal and state approaches to these questions and also examines sentencing in other countries. In discussing the issues, we assess competing models of sentencing and current debates about the proper goals of policing, justice, incarceration, rehabilitation, deterrence and retribution.

      Prerequisite: Criminal Law & Criminal Procedure I

      • Credit: 2 hours

      390 Appellate Theory & Process

      Through an examination of the history, theory, and the process of federal and state appellate courts, this seminar provides a theoretical and legal background into matters that are critical to appellate processes. We will read about and discuss the source, nature and application of rules particularly important to the appellate process including precedent and stare decisis; standards of review; preservation of issues; harmless and plain error; interlocutory review; and high court discretionary review.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      391 Criminal Procedure II: Prosecution, Defense & Adjudication

      This course starts where Criminal Procedure: Police Practices ends by looking at the prosecution and adjudication of criminal cases. Topics include the right to counsel, pretrial release and detention, charging, double jeopardy, pleas and plea bargains, confrontation of witnesses, sentencing, appeals and post conviction remedies.

      • Credit: 3 hours

      393 International Children's Rights

      This seminar focuses on current children's issues being addressed through the formation of an international children's rights legal scheme. Students must actively participate in classroom discussion; prepare on engaging class presentation, moot court argument or debate and complete a high-quality research paper related to international children's rights.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      394 Biomedical Research

      Introduction into how the legal system and biomedicine work in the context of advertising and medical diagnosis. Students will be introduced to some medical and science issues. We will examine how federal law regulates clinical research, paying special attention to Institutional Review Boards, informed consent and confidentiality laws; criticisms of the current scheme, focusing on conflicts of interest. The second half of the course will discuss questions surrounding genetic research, including the meaning of genetic information, legal status of human tissue, how genetic information may lead to discrimination and how the law should regulate genetic information.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      395 Oregon Family Law Practice

      This course will offer students an opportunity to put into practice what they learned in the basic family law course. The course will operate much like a practical skills course, but will focus on Oregon family law, and will include substantial preparation of written work. Students will participate in motions regarding their cases, custody evaluations, mediation and a trial of contested issues. In addition, students will learn how property is divided; child support is determined; what factors are significant in a custody evaluation and how a qualified domestic relations order is created.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      396 Oregon Criminal Procedure & Practice

      Advanced study of Oregon criminal procedure and practice. Emphasis on recognizing and litigating, from trial through appeal, criminal/constitutional procedure issues including self-incrimination, right to counsel, search and seizure, and speedy trial. In this course students will study selected cases and articles, prepare written motions and responses and present oral argument on the motions and responses. Grade is based on class participation and quality of written and oral motion practice.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      397 Public Health Law

      This seminar will focus on the authority of local governments to regulate for the public health. From smoking bans to proposed limits on large sodas, cities and counties are often at the vanguard of public health regulatory efforts. This class will examine the legal issues—both doctrinal and normative—that arise when government takes aggressive regulatory action in this regard. Some familiarity with local government law is encouraged, but not required. The course will also examine the commercial speech doctrine under the First Amendment. It is highly recommended that one take Administrative Law (Law 255) and State & Local Government (Law 304) prior to this course. First Amendment (Law 381) is recommended as well. Updated 03/2014.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      398 Deposition Skills Training

      This course provides students with hands-on training on how to conduct and defend depositions in a simulated setting. Students learn to build a strong framework for basic deposition techniques as well as how to handle expert witness depositions. They will draft documents related to depositions, including notices, subpoenas, motions, affidavits, and proposed orders. The course will use a simulated case file and will include direct instruction, videotaped performance, team practice, and structured feedback.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      399 Selected Topics in Labor & Employment Law

      This seminar provides an opportunity for intensive study of the law of the workplace. While addressing the legal doctrine governing key components of the relationships between employers and employees, the seminar emphasizes the role current legal regimes play in structuring workplaces and workplace behavior. The topics addressed include the social and economic significance of work, the decline of unionism, the rise of the individual rights model versus the collective, and the incentives for hiring and workplace governance created by various antidiscrimination statutes, wage protections and employment entitlements.

      • Credit: 2 hours
      • Offering: Taught in alternate years

      3001 War Crimes & the Law of War

      This course will examine international criminal and humanitarian law and enforcement mechanisms. Areas to be explored are: the development of international norms of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes; the jurisdiction and procedure of international tribunals, including the International Criminal Court (ICC), the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), and the hybrid tribunals, such as those in Sierra Leone, Cambodia, Bosnia, East Timor and Kosovo; and domestic applications of international criminal law and related jurisdictional issues. We will discuss the effectiveness of different mechanisms as response to mass atrocity.

      Prerequisite: International Law & Dispute Resolution

      • Credit: 2 hours

      3002 Race and the Law

      This seminar will explore the historical and contemporary treatment of race in the United States by both the courts and the legislature. The seminar will employ an interdisciplinary approach to examining the social and political forces that have and continue to contribute to the development of legal doctrine in the areas of education, employment, interracial sex and marriage, and public accommodations, among other things. Throughout, the seminar will explore the definition of race, the intersection of race and gender, the interplay of race and class, the juxtaposition of various ethnic groups, and the utility of a biracial dichotomy in a multiracial and multiethnic society. Most of the seminar will focus on particular racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. society (e.g. African-, Asian-, Caucasian-, Native-, and Mexican Americans).

      • Credit: 2 hours

      3005 Legislators, Lobbyists and the People

      This course considers the realities between a representative democracy and factors that influence the course of legislation, such as campaign financing, lobbying and special interest groups, and deal making. Topics may vary from year to year based on current practices and proposals. Likely topics include evaluation of the law on lobbying and lobbying techniques, costs (both financial and other) of lobbying efforts, compromise and negotiation in the legislature, the efficacy of attempts to persuade legislators, and the impact of technology. Students will write and present a research paper of approximately 20 pages in length. Papers of sufficient quality can be used to satisfy the third-year writing requirement.

      • Credit: 2 hours

      3007 Cross-Cultural Dispute Resolution

      The course examines how the obvious and not-so-obvious cultural differences impact resolution of inter-personal and inter-state (international) disputes. The course brings an international perspective to understanding the impact of culture in the most commonly used international and domestic dispute resolution practices (negotiation, mediation, and arbitration) from the perspective of the disputant, the advocate and the neutral.

      • Credit: 2 hours
      • Offering: Spring

      3008 Advanced Intellectual Property: Technology Transfer & Commercialization

      Advanced Intellectual Property: Technology Transfer and Commercialization is a 2-hour writing seminar in which students will examine the national and global influence of intellectual property, including patents, trade secrets, copyrights, trademarks, publicity rights, and Internet law. In particular, students will study how technology is transferred in both the national and global market, and how technology is introduced respectively in those markets. In this seminar, students are expected to already have foundational knowledge of IP. In most situations, students shall obtain this foundational knowledge in the IP Survey course, and, accordingly, this is general prerequisite. In exceptional circumstances, the professor may waive the IP Survey prerequisite. This is most likely to happen when a student has taken another IP course or developed foundational knowledge through work experience.

      Prerequisite: Intellectual Property (or instructor consent)

      • Credit: 2 hours
      • Offering: Spring

      3009 Capital Punishment

      This seminar will cover the history and law of the modern (post-1970) death penalty in the United States. We will examine the roles played by different actors in the criminal justice system in death penalty cases, including prosecutors, judges, jurors and defense lawyers. We also will explore the topics of aggravating and mitigating factors, future dangerousness, categorical exemptions, race and gender bias, habeas and ineffective assistance of counsel, competence and volunteers (or waiver of appeals). Grades will be based on class participation and a final paper. Updated 07/2013.

      Prerequisite: Criminal Law; Criminal Procedure I (or concurrently)

      • Credit: 2 hours
      • Offering: Spring

      401 Willamette Law Review

      Advanced research, writing, and editing of scholarly legal articles. Cooperative work with students, professors, lawyers, and other authors. (Membership primarily by written competition.)

      • Credit: 2 hours

      404 National Appellate Competition

      1 hour first time competing; 0 hours second time competing. Maximum of 1 hour.


        409 Spaulding Trial Competition

        1 hour first time competing; 0 hours second time competing. Maximum of 1 hour.


          415 International Law Moot Court


            416 International Law Moot Court Competition

            1 hour first time competing; 0 hours second time competing. Maximum of 1 hour.


              418 AAJ Trial Competition

              American Association for Justice trial competition. 1 hour first time competing; 0 hours second time competing. Maximum of 1 hour.


                420 Willamette Journal of International Law and Dispute Resolution

                Advanced research, writing and editing of scholarly legal articles concerning international law and international dispute resolution. Cooperative work with students, professors, lawyers and other authors. 0 hours first semester; 1 hour second semester. Maximum 2 hours.

                Prerequisite: International Law & Dispute Resolution or Negotiation I


                  422 Negotiation Competition

                  1 hour first time enrolled; 0 hours second time enrolled. Maximum of 1 hour.


                    425 Open Appellate Competition

                    1 hour first time competing; 0 hours second time competing. Maximum of 1 hour.


                      426 Don Turner Criminal Trial Competition

                      1 hour first time competing; 0 hours second time competing. Maximum of 1 hour.


                        430-433 Moot Court Board

                        Organization and supervision of the oral arguments for spring semester Legal Research and Writing, and other Moot Court competitions. 0 hours credit.


                          453 American Law & Legal Research

                          (German Students only) This course is designed for German exchange students from Bucerius Law School and for other foreign students who already know something about their own legal system. It introduces American legal culture, legal educations, sources of law, statutory and case analysis, and the principal public and private law subjects encountered in an American law school.

                          • Credit: 2 hours

                          470 Independent Research

                          This course involves the preparation of a paper or thesis on a topic selected by the student which is not fully covered by the regular curriculum, under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. One credit hour requires 52 hours of work, including any meetings with the supervising full-time faculty member. Two credit hours requires 104 hours of work, including any meetings with the supervising full-time faculty member.

                          • Credit: 1-2 hours

                          475 Supreme Court Praktikum

                          (German Students only) This Praktikum or internship is designed for German exchange students from Bucerius Law School to meet an eligibility requirement to take the German first state examination for jurists. Coordinated in cooperation with the Oregon Supreme Court, students observe, participate in, and write documents associated with proceedings in civil, criminal, and administrative cases at first instance, appellate, and Supreme Court levels. The Praktikum covers equivalent of four or six weeks and may begin prior to other fall semester courses.

                          • Credit: 2 hours

                          476 Law and Government Practicum

                          Students are required to engage in a significant research and writing project of an external placement in law and government.

                          • Credit: 2 hours

                          478 Externship

                          Externship is a course providing field learning opportunities in government, nonprofit and corporate practices, where you work for academic credit, not pay. The goal of the program is to provide learning about fundamental skills and values of the lawyer within the context of actual legal practice and under the tutelage of experienced lawyers. Updated 06/2014.

                          Prerequisite: Dependent upon placement

                          • Credit: 3 or 6 hours

                          480 Full-Time Externship

                          The full-time externship course provides in-depth, field learning opportunities in judicial, government, nonprofit, and in some cases, private settings with firms or in-house counsel, under the tutelage of lawyers and judges. You work for academic credit, not pay. There is a class component associated with the course. The goals of the program are to learn the day-to-day skills that are necessary for the practice of law, to turn theory of law into practical lawyering skills, to instill the rules of professionalism by observing the practices of lawyers and judges, and to increase substantive knowledge in various legal areas. An externship improves lawyering skills, knowledge and self-confidence. Enrollment will generally be limited, based on available resources, to less than 10 students per semester or summer term, and is limited to applicants who meet established requirements. See the Director of Career & Professional Development for more details. Updated 06/2014.

                          Prerequisite: Dependent upon placement

                          • Credit: Summer, 9 credits; regular term, 13 hours regular term; additional 1-2 credits available if writing a paper. hours

                          4004 Advanced Trial Practice

                          The primary way trial lawyers learn and then master their craft is by trying cases-and the more cases they can try, the better. The current reality, however, is that at the beginning of one's career it is difficult to get the intensive, high pressure experience which has spawned good trial lawyers in the past. Advanced Trial Practice has been designed to afford just such an experience and, hence, the opportunity to become more profoundly "courtroom ready." Working in rotating teams of two, students will try a different case every week for 5 weeks. The complexity of the cases progresses from a sexual harassment case to a factually complex sale of goods case. The course emphasizes experiential learning with feedback as a methodology for teaching trial skills. This methodology is similar to that used at skills seminars for practicing lawyers offered by the National Institute for Trial Advocacy (NITA) whose materials are used in the course. Updated 04/2014.

                          Prerequisite: Civil Trial Practice or Trial Practice

                          • Credit: 3 hours

                          518 Ocean Resources

                          Fisheries management and continental shelf resources; living resource management; non-living resource management (deep seabed mining, alternative energy sources, and outer continental shelf oil and gas); marine environmental protection; and comprehensive ocean management (marine sanctuaries and alternative management regimes).

                          • Credit: 2 hours

                          526 Chinese Law and Legal Institutions

                          Four-week summer program at the East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai, Peoples' Republic of China. Chinese legal theory; constitutional law; criminal law; criminal procedure; civil law; civil procedure; corporation law; marriage law; taxation; joint venture law; economic contract law; introduction to mediation, arbitration and other means of dispute resolution; international trade and investment law; private international law issues. Classes and extra-curricular events are followed by discussion with Chinese professors, lawyers, and officials.

                          • Credit: 6 hours

                          613 Trial Practice

                          Preparation of civil and criminal cases; voir dire; direct and cross-examination; opening and closing statements. Each student argues several cases before professors and members of bench and bar of Oregon and Washington.

                          Prerequisite: Evidence

                          • Credit: 3 hours

                          618-01 Business Law Clinic

                          Students will work on transactional matters involving nonprofit entities. This may include helping the organization acquire their 501©)(3) status, drafting bylaws and articles of incorporation, and providing legal advice on a continuing basis.

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II

                          • Credit: 2-4 hours

                          618-03 Trusts and Estates Clinic

                          Students will assist clients in estate planning matters. This may include, among other tasks, consulting with and advising clients on estate matters, and drafting wills, revocable trusts, special needs trusts, powers of attorney and Advanced Directives.

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II; Trusts & Estates

                          • Credit: 2-4 hours

                          618-04 Child and Family Advocacy Clinic

                          Students will work on cases and matters involving children and families, especially those affected by family violence. Students may also have the opportunity to provide education advocacy for children with special needs and to assist with impact litigation intended to advance the protection of children. Students may interview clients, prepare pleadings and motions, conduct fact-finding, negotiate with opposing counsel and appear in court or administrative or administrative proceedings.

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II

                          • Credit: 2-4 hours

                          618-06 Law and Government Clinic

                          Students will investigate complaints filed with the Oregon Attorney’s General Financial Fraud/Consumer Protection Section. Investigations are conducted under the Attorney’s General enforcement including enforcement pursuant to Oregon’s Unlawful Trade Practices Act. Students working on these investigations gather evidence substantiating the consumer complaint and drafting civil investigative demands, assurances of voluntary compliance and complaints. Participating in negotiations with the business is often the final phase of the investigation. Students may also have the opportunity to assist other government entities and to lobby the Oregon state legislature on select issues.

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II

                          • Credit: 2-4 hours

                          618-08 Sustainability Law Clinic

                          Students will have the chance to work hands-on at the cutting edge of sustainability issues such as solar power, water quality, quality, and distribution, sustainable development projects, etc. Student will interact directly with government staff and others, and may see the results of their work implemented in law or policy.

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II

                          • Credit: 2-4 hours

                          618-09 Human Rights & Immigration Clinic

                          Students will have the opportunity to work on international human rights cases and projects, and represent clients in asylum and other immigration cases, including assisting them in obtaining T, U, and VAWA visas. Students may have the opportunity to participate in federal litigation, international litigation, and human rights fact-finding and report writing. Students may also have the opportunity to collaborate with local, regional, and national human rights NGOs. Updated 06/2014.

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II

                          • Credit: 2-4 hours

                          619 Mediation & Mediation Advocacy

                          This course covers the mediation process from the perspective of the mediator and from the perspective of the attorney or disputant using this form of dispute resolution. Critical issues of neutrality, confidentiality, and qualifications are included as well as specific skills and techniques used by the mediator. In addition, the course covers how to use mediation effectively. The course work is covered using text, class discussion and activities, short papers and role playing.

                          Prerequisite: Negotiation I

                          • Credit: 3 hours

                          633 Contract Drafting

                          This course is intended to give the third year law student hands-on experience in drafting several forms of commonly used contracts, including contracts for personal services, goods and the sale or lease of real property, as well as ancillary documents, such as letters of intent. Using examples of typical business transactions, the student will learn how to identify and translate elements of such transactions into clear and unambiguous contract terms and conditions. The class will examine the use of standard or boilerplate clauses in contracts, drafting rules and the impact of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code on contract drafting. Students will examine and discuss a range of issues confronted by the transactional attorney during the drafting process, including client expectations, control of drafting, role of the attorney in contract negotiations, and ethical challenges that arise during the drafting process. Students will be paired into teams to provide a realistic environment for negotiating and drafting various kinds of contracts.

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II

                          • Credit: 2 hours

                          634 Advanced Clinic

                          Business Law (01), Child and Family Advocacy (04), Law and Government (06), Sustainability Law (08), Human Rights and Immigration (09) (See 618 for descriptions)

                          Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II; Civil Practice Clinic

                          • Credit: 2-4 hours

                          635 Advanced Negotiation

                          Prerequisite: Negotiation I; Mediation & Mediation Advocacy

                          • Credit: 3 hours

                          636 Recent Developments in Dispute Resolution

                          The Recent Developments in Dispute Resolution (RDDR) class is structured exclusively to improve the writing skills of Center for Dispute Resolution (CDR) certificate students. This one credit class focuses on multiple aspects of writing, but aims primarily to increase skills in research and case summarizing.

                          Prerequisite: CDR Students only

                          • Credit: 1 hours
                          • Offering: Fall

                          637 Setting Up A Law Practice

                          This course is an introduction to the building of a successful law practice. It will focus on the practical skills and considerations necessary in the establishment of a law practice, including staffing, marketing, advertising and client development, client relations, trust accounting, file management, client billing and the development of a detailed business plan.

                          • Credit: 2 hours
                          • Offering: Spring

                          638 Teaching Negotiation

                          This course is designed for LL.M in Dispute Resolution students. Negotiation 1 or Introduction to Negotiation is a pre-requisite for this course. This course will teach the basics of negotiation teaching from both theoretical and practical framework. Students will be required to teach a certain number of hours besides assisting the professor in teaching negotiation lessons. Students are also required to attend individualized debrief sessions.

                          Prerequisite: Negotiation I

                          • Credit: 3 hours
                          • Offering: Spring

                          639 Judicial Opinion Writing

                          This course provides students with the opportunity to hone their legal writing skills by focusing on the craft of judicial writing. Students will learn about the relationship between writing and decision making and will acquire techniques for writing clearly, precisely, and unambiguously. Students will learn these techniques by working closely with retired Chief Justice De Muniz in the drafting of opinions in actual cases from the circuit court, the Oregon Court of Appeals, and the Oregon Supreme Court. Enrollment is limited to no more than five third-year law students.

                          • Credit: 3 hours

                          640 Legal Analysis for the Bar

                          Legal Analysis for the Bar Exam is a three-credit course that focuses on improving the analytical skills necessary to do well on bar exam questions. The course will include an intensive review of three subjects that are routinely tested on several parts of the bar exam (Evidence, Torts, and Criminal Law and Procedure). In the context of these subjects, students will complete problems and exercises in all three bar exam formats (MBE, MEE, and MPT) using actual questions from past bar examinations. Students will become familiar with techniques for answering multiple-choice questions; and analyzing, organizing, and writing essay and multistate performance question responses. The course also emphasizes memorization skills and learning how to self-assess understanding of concepts. Because of the strategic coverage of the course, it serves as a suitable first step to prepare for any state’s bar exam. IMPORTANT: The course is intended to supplement, not replace, a full commercial bar preparation course. Updated 10/2014.

                          Prerequisite: Be a 3L in one's last semester.

                          • Credit: 3 hours