Alex T. Nice

Alex T. Nice

Alex Nice, an ancient historian with special expertise in Roman religion and divination, taught Ancient History and Latin at Willamette University from 2006-2007, including a very popular course on Ancient Magic and another similarly well-received course on Roman Africa.

Dr. Nice has published on Caesar, Cicero, Livy, Juvenal, Tacitus, and Cassius Dio. In 2005, Dr. Nice was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to attend a summer seminar in Rome and pursue a summer research project on ancient Roman religion and culture. His project, entitled "The gens Marcia and Roman Religion in the Late Republic", studied the influence that the nobility in Rome exacted on the city’s religious institutions.

A native of Great Britain, Alex Nice previously was the head of the now defunct Classics Department at the University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg, South Africa) and a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and at Reed College. He left Willamette for a permanent teaching position at the European School in Woluwé (Belgium).

Education

  • B.A., M.Phil., University of Wales (UK)
  • Ph.D., University of Exerter (UK)

Select Publications

"The Reputation of the mantis Aristander," Acta Classica 48 (2005) (in honorem Prof. J.E.A. Atkinson) 87-102.

"C. Trebatius Testa and the British charioteers: the relationship of Cic. Ad fam. 7.10.2 to Caes. BG 4.25 and 33," Acta Classica 46 (2003) 171-96.

"The persona of Umbricius and Divination in Juvenal, Satires Three and Six," in: Studies in Latin Literature and Roman History XI. Collection Latomus. Brussels 2003, 401-418.

"Ennius or Cicero? The disreputable diviners at Cicero, De Divinatione 1.132," Acta Classica 44 (2001) 153-66.

"Superstition and religion in Tacitus' and Dio's accounts of the Boudican revolt," Pegasus 36 (1993) 15-18.