Events and Calendars

Fall 2015 - Spring 2016

To see an archive of past events go here.



September 3, 2015

7:30 PM

Dr. Eleana Yalouri, Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University, Athens

September 17, 2015

7:30 PM
Dr. Robin Rhodes, Department of Art, Art History, and Design, University of Notre Dame

September 29, 2015

7:00 p.m.

Color, 117 minutes

As a prelude to Robert Edsel’s lecture on Oct. 15, the Emmy award winning PBS documentary, The Rape of Europa, will be shown on Tuesday, Sept. 29 and Tuesday, Oct.13 at 7:00 p.m. in the Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. The film tells the epic story of the theft, destruction and survival of Europe’s art treasures during the Third Reich and World War II. Actress Joan Allen narrates this breathtaking chronicle about the battle over the very survival of Western civilization.


 

October 1, 2015

7:30 p.m.

Dr. Scott Pike, Associate Professor of Environmental Science, Geology, and Archaeology, Environmental and Earth Sciences Department, Willamette University

October 23, 2014

7:00 p.m.
Color, 117 minutes

As a prelude to Robert Edsel’s lecture on Oct. 15, the Emmy award winning PBS documentary, The Rape of Europa, will be shown on Tuesday, Sept. 29 and Tuesday, Oct.13 at 7:00 p.m. in the Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. The film tells the epic story of the theft, destruction and survival of Europe’s art treasures during the Third Reich and World War II. Actress Joan Allen narrates this breathtaking chronicle about the battle over the very survival of Western civilization.

November 13, 2014

7:30 p.m.
The Role of Inter-regional Trade in the Uruk Expansion: Putting the Pieces Together, College of Law, Paulus Lecture Hall, Room 201

Dr. Leah Minc
Associate Professor of Anthropology
Oregon State University

Ceramic Analysis

During the mid-4th millennium BCE, the material culture of Mesopotamia spread rapidly from the southern heartland into the surrounding uplands. Distinctive ceramic vessel forms (droop spouts, nose lug jars, and jars with incised cross-hatch bands), as will as administrative technology (seals, tokens, numerical tablets), and architectural patterns began to appear in settlements throughout SW Iran, NE Syria, and southern Turkey, suggesting a major and sustained presence of people from S. Mesopotamia. Since the path-breaking work of Guillermo Algaze, this "Uruk Expansion" has been largely understood as an attempt by cities of the alluvial plain to gain control of upland raw materials and resources, first, by the colonization of the near-by Susiana Plain of Iran, and secondly, by the establishment of trading enclaves along key river valleys leading to the interior. Yet little is securely known of the types of goods traded, nor of the specific routes of communication throughout the Uruk world. This lecture presents the results of chemical analyses of ceramic pastes using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) with the goal of monitoring potential ceramic trade between the Mesopotamian heartland and outlying Uruk settlements. In a major international, collaborative research effort, we have now completed trace-element analyses of nearly 1900 Uruk-era vessels from key sites stretching across Mesopotamia, N. Iraq, Syria, and Iran. These analyzes provide physical evidence allowing researchers to monitor whether ceramic vessels and containers were moving between the lowlands of Mesopotamia and the surrounding highlands, and to reexamine the significance of the shared ceramic styles marking the "Uruk Expansion".

February 19, 2015

7:30 p.m.
Dining with the Dead: New Discoveries in early Byzantine Sicily, Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room

Dr. R. J. A. Wilson
Director, Centre for the Study of Ancient Sicily
Professor Emeritus of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire
The University of British Columbia (Canada)

UBC Excavations

This talk will describe the results of the University of British Columbia's archaeological excavations in Sicily between 2008 and 2010. The site was at Punta Secca (RG), known to millions of Italians as the home of TV cop, Salvo Montalbano; it lies right on the south coast of Sicily, is a late Roman and Early Byzantine village. It was partly excavated in the 1960s and 1970s by Paola Pelagatti, Honorary Fellow of the BSR, and identified by her as the Kaukana of the ancient sources, where Belisarius set sail for the conquest of Africa in 533 AD. The aim of the new excavation was to focus on one building, a house, and examine in detail its building phases, its function, and the commercial contacts that its inhabitants enjoyed with other parts of Sicily - and indeed the wider Mediterranean world. While substantial progress was made on all these questions, the biggest surprise was the discovery of a tomb placed in what was probably the yard of the house in the second quarter of the seventh century AD, and of evidence for associated feasting in honor of the deceased. Who was inside the tomb, and why did that person deserve this level of respect? What evidence was there for feasts, and what did they eat? Was it pagan or a Christian burial? And what was the tomb doing here, in a domestic setting, rather than in the village cemetery, or indeed, if the deceased was Christian, in or near the settlement's church? These and other intriguing questions will be addressed in the lecture, and the discovery set in the context of what else is knownabout such practices in late Roman and early Byzantine funerary culture.

March 5, 2015

7:30 p.m.
Ancient Greek Gynecology for Beginners: Wine, Women, and Wandering Wombs (8th Annual Lane C. McGaughy CASA Lecture) , College of Law, Paulus Lecture Hall, Room 201

Dr. Helen King
Professor of Classical Studies and Chair
The Open University, London (United Kingdom)

Helen King

How did ancient medicine answer the fundamental questions about the sexed body: how far are women different from men, and how should medicine take this into account? In this lecture Professor King will introduce the strange world of ancient women's medicine and the remedies for women's diseases, including scent therapy. She will demonstrate why diagnoses and remedies which no longer make sense to us - such as the 'wandering womb' and the beetle pessary - made perfect sense to the ancient Greeks, and investigate how men and women interacted in accounting for disease and in proposing cures.

Co-sponsored by Willamette University's Women and Gender Studies Program.

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