Combined 3-2 Engineering Program

Students earn a Bachelor of Arts from Willamette (WU) and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from one of the affiliated engineering schools (AES).

What are the Options?

  • 3 years at WU
  • 2 years at AES
  • BA from WU
  • BS from AES

BS is the professional degree (allows getting certified and working as engineer).

Students are eligible for federal financial aid throughout the full five years.

Guaranteed admission with Columbia if all requirements fulfilled.

In principle any major, but some majors will not accept transfer credit back to WU. Physics aligns nicely.

Must fulfill all general education requirements at Willamette and make significant progress toward their major.

  • 4 years at WU
  • 2 years at Columbia
  • BA from WU,
  • BS from Columbia

BS is the professional degree (allows getting certified and working as engineer).

Students are only eligible for federal financial aid during their time at WU.

No guaranteed admission.

Only available in certain fields of engineering.

Any major, STEM majors strongly preferred.

Note: Very different application. Contact admissions at Columbia early on!

  • 4 years at WU
  • 2 years at Columbia
  • BA from WU,
  • Master's from Columbia

Master's is the preferred choice if interest in academia or R&D in industry.

Students are only eligible for federal financial aid during their time at WU.

No TA or RA scholarships (unlike in most other STEM graduate programs).

No guaranteed admission.

Only available in certain fields of engineering.

Major in physics, chemistry, or math required.

  • 3 years at WU
  • 3 years at AES
  • BA from WU
  • BS, Master's from AES

BS is the professional degree (allows getting certified and working as engineer).

No guaranteed admission.

Very demanding and generally not recommended.

General Program Requirements

Note that every engineering major has slightly different requirements. Below are the typical requirements for all engineering majors.

  • Students must make significant progress toward their major (typically all courses except senior year courses) and make arrangements with their major advisers to transfer credit back from the AES. In physics, minimum requirement is six physics courses (Intro Physics I & II, Modern Physics, Mechanics, ATEP + 1 more).
  • Students must complete their general education program (MOIs).
  • Math requirements: Calculus through Differential equations.
  • Physics requirements: Physics I and II, sometimes Modern Physics
  • Chemistry requirements: Chemistry I and II
  • Computer Science requirements: one programming language course. Most engineering majors accept or even require Matlab, but some prefer Java.
  • Typical GPA requirements: currently 3.0 for USC, 3.25 for Washington University, and 3.30 for Columbia (overall and for pre-engineering courses).
  • Must pass the pre-engineering courses with at least a B on the first try. Never take pre-engineering courses pass/fail.
  • Must take (almost) all required courses at WU.
  • In addition, most engineering schools prefer if you take a course in Statics, Dynamics, and Materials before applying to their program. Willamette does not offer these course; you have to take them over the summer e.g. from a community college. Make sure to check with the engineering school to ensure that these courses satisfy their requirements and will transfer. USC requires all three courses prior to your arrival. The civil engineering major at all engineering schools generally also requires that you have taken all three courses prior to your arrival.

University-Specific Requirements

  • Columbia University specific requirements: In addition, one course in Economics.
  • Washington University specific requirements: In addition, at least 6 semester hours of social science courses and 6 semester hours of humanities courses. Two of these courses must be from the same department with one course at the upper level [300-400]. Note that one Willamette credit is equivalent to 4 semester hours.
  • University of Southern California specific requirements: Note that you won’t find out whether or not you are accepted into the program until June 1st! While USC does not require a course in Econ, they like to see it on your transcript. Take it if you can!

Alternatives

  • Physics Bachelors are very employable; see e.g. www.aps.org and click on Careers in Physics.
  • The University of Oregon offers a great program (Master's Industrial Internship Program, http://internship.uoregon.edu/) that prepares students for a career in industry (1-year program resulting in a master's degree and 9-months industrial internship experience).